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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Expatriate I hate to break it to you but the protester is for the other side. I know things get confusing and he does say he has huevos but uhm those kooky right wing blogs you read aren't too bright.

Just curious if you've read that Constitution yet, the parts to look for might just be how to impeach a sitting president. Most countries have rules about how to do that sort of thing, that's why we didn't surround Bush's White House with pitchforks and all. I think when the army arrests and deports the elected president in the middle of the night it's probably against the constitution.

Just sayin.

Glad we have an FBI and what not here to keep tabs on all you nutters.

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Man, you're desperate. Laugh Laugh Laugh And where does it say that's a protester for the other side? Let me guess...because YOU decided he is? That's funny stuff.

Seriously...let's take a moment to examine that ridiculous post. The protester is smiling and proudly holding a sign that says his country doesn't have oil or dollars, but it has guts. Why is he holding that sign?

Option A: He's holding the sign because his country had the guts to toss out a president that wanted to take the country down the road to Chavism in violation of the Constitution -- and that his little country has the guts to stand firm against the US and the threat of military intervention from Venezuela.

Or

Option B: He's a Zelaya supporter who's proud that his country had the guts to...what?

You keep dodging the issue, obviously because you can't deal with hit. The point is that this is that the duly elected government of Honduras dealt with a rogue president and replaced him with an interim president from the former president's own party. That's like arresting Obama and making Pelosi interim president. You've tried unsuccessfully to peddle the smoke and mirrors argument that this was some type of military coup, which has been shown not to be the case. Now you're down to stamping your feet, acting like a child, and calling names.

As for rules, apparently Honduras does have them -- it seems they have rules about presidents trying to take over the government.

Oh, yeah...and the interim president wants to hold elections by November.

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Because there are no pro government protesters, what would they be protesting about? On the other hand there were thousands at the airport to welcome their president back, and days of protests after the military took over.

Forget Honduras just read our constitution, we dont' take over our country, and instal new presidents at whim.

Expatriate sometimes I fear I'm going to read about you in the newspaper someday.

I think when the military takes over a country they call that a military coup.

Just curious are you a member of the AIP?

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Honduras -- the rest of the story
pangolin wrote:
there are no pro government protesters

Laugh Laugh

Baghdad Bob, is that you? Here are some of the protestors you claim don't exist:

http://lagringasblogicito.blogspot.com/2009/07/photos-of-pro-government-...

Forget Honduras, just read our Constitution? This is a thread about Honduras. Our Constitution doesn't matter -- what matters is Honduran law. You see, Honduras is like a whole other country -- it's not part of America. Sounds like you're confused on this point. Our Constitution doesn't apply to Honduras any more than it does to Laos.

And ONCE AGAIN -- the military isn't running the country. If the military had in fact taken over the country and some general stepped up and took charge, I'd agree that it was a military coup. But the legitimate congress and supreme court of Honduras are still in charge. The interim president was appointed by Congress and is from Zelaya's party -- and he wants election.

You can hold your hands over your ears and chant your fantasies all you want, but it won't change facts.

Say Hi to Mr. Roark and Tattoo for me.

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

US aid has been cut as is obligatory by our law in a military coup.

http://www.laprensa.hn/Ediciones/2009/07/09/Noticias/EUA-presiona-y-susp...

Foreign Minister Enrique Ortez Colindres had to resign after calling Obama a plantation n*****. Classy bunch of heroes you've got there Expatriate. I guess the General who led the coup was arrested for car theft in the 90s. Typical.

http://www.laprensa.hn/Ediciones/2009/07/09/Noticias/Roberto-Flores-Berm...

Oops Title one article 4 sounds like treason to me.
http://countrystudies.us/honduras/84.htm

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

The general was arrested for car theft? Your outrage is pretty hollow, considering Obama admitted cocaine use, Ted Kennedy killed a woman in a DUI, Robert Byrd recruited for the KKK, and Barney Frank had gay hookers at his house.

As for the foreign minister, that actually speaks highly of the Honduran government that they held him accountable for insulting Obama -- considering that the US used to be a Honduran ally and has stabbed them in the back on this issue in favor of Hugo Chavez.

You'd be making better use of your time if you researched the issues instead of trying to find smear ammo. Remember -- Zelaya violated Honduran law when he tried to have a referendum without approval. He was told by the supreme court that it was illegal, and he was told by the supreme court that he couldn't fire the general.

So you're still avoiding the point: what do you do when the Supreme Court and Congress use their legal powers to rein in a president, and he responds by thumbing his nose at them and refusing to recognize the law? At some point the guy leaves you with no choice but physical restraint. Say for example a president was impeached, and then refused to move out of the White House. Do you just let him stay and do what he wants, or do you arrest him and pull him out by force?

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

I see the media is dropping the Honduran issue pretty quickly. Sounds like people are starting to figure it out. Note that the Dems are now referring to it as "essentially" a military coup. In political language, the addition of that qualifier is pretty significant. The Dems are even starting to admit that Zelaya caused the thing.

So, like the surge in Iraq, if the liberals are going to work their way around to the conservative position eventually, why not just go conservative in the first place?

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.0dac785ec5c1ab99f080af7212db...

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Honduras -- the rest of the story
Quote:
You'd be making better use of your time if you researched the issues instead of trying to find smear ammo.

I don't follow Honduras carefully as I don't have much interest. Very small country without much affect on the US. The only interesting part of the story was it's affect on democratic institutions overall in the Americas and the RW in America's reaction to the coup by backing a military take over of a government.

Iran is of far far greater stratigic interest as is Afganistan, the wind down of the fiasco in Iraq, any number of other countries.

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Uh-huh. Typical. Once it starts unraveling and you find yourself exposed, suddenly there's nothing to see here and the story is irrelevant. You made 11 posts full of arguing and several links attempting to back a bad position, and suddenly you claim that you don't follow the issue because it's of no interest.

It's a perfect metaphor for what we see in liberal politics these days -- a lot of outrage and debate, but when it starts to turn against them they just want it to go away and it suddenly disappears from the news.

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

What's turned against who?

Whole world still knows there was an undemocratic coup by the military in Hondurus. Lots of money pouring into the TV night and day down there but you can't change history.

History is against the dictators too, look at Nicaragua and El Salvadore. In general, history moves towards open democracy and representative government, it's inexorable.

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