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expatriate's picture
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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Funny how all you hear in the MSM is that the situation in Honduras is a military coup. Obama has even come out and said it's illegal (apparently he's some sort of expert on Honduran law). And yet it seems there's more:

- The situation started when the Honduran president wanted to change the Constitution to allow him to run for more terms (ala Hugo Chavez).

- Such action requires a vote to be condoned by Congress, which they refused.

- The president decided to hold the election on his own, and asked the Army to oversee it like it normally would.

- The general in charge of the Army refused, because such a vote would be illegal.

- The president fired the general.

- Congress ordered the president to reinstate the general.

- The president refused.

- Congress ordered the president arrested and appointed a new president.

This isn't a case of a military gone rogue and taking control of a country. This was a president trying to expand his powers against congressional will and in violation of the law. The military was enforcing the will of the Honduran congress as it attempted to control a rogue president trying to take power he didn't have. Obviously, dictators like Chavez and Castro would find this appalling, and it's shameful that our president agrees with them.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124623220955866301.html

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Re: Honduras -- the rest of the story
expatriate wrote:
Obviously, dictators like Chavez and Castro would find this appalling, and it's shameful that our president agrees with them.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124623220955866301.html

Did you honestly expect anything less of him?

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

It's threads such as these that make me acutely aware of just how lucky we are that the last 8 years are over.

I mean what kind of people celebrate the overthrow of a democraticaly elected government

P.S. Chavez was elected with 63% in an election that passed stricter international monitoring standards than our could withstand. No vote cadging there.

We've had a democratic government here for some 200 years. I think people who like the military staging cout detats should all pack up and go to Honduras.

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Thanks for posting Ex!

In Honduras the people did the right thing in throwing out Mr Zelaya. That's what happens when you try and change the laws to suit yourself. He was not following his own country's constitution. I'm appalled that Hillary and Obama supported Zelaya's actions.

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

HIllary, Obama, the UN general assembly, the organisation of American States, don't know one country that supports the military coup. Wonder why right wing Americans think that the military surrounding the Presidential palace, arresting the head of state, and exiling him from the country days before a referendum is somehow, "the people"? Most wing nuts deep down hate voting dont' you think?

Probably right wing loonies are the same everywhere, thank gosh we've got the FBI here to keep a close watch on them.

expatriate's picture
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Honduras -- the rest of the story

I think it's odd how people who were so anxious to impeach Bush are so supportive of Zelaya.

Let's put this in perspective. Suppose a legally elected president in the US decided to get rid of the 22nd Amendment and set himself up for a third term. When Congress refuses to repeal the 22nd Amendment with the constitutional process, he decides to do it on his own -- in violation of the Constitution.

Congress and the Supreme Court both try to rein him in in accordance with the Constitution by referencing the law and using legal procedures. And yet the president continues to violate the Constitution and thumbs his nose at both the legislative and judicial branches.

So what do the legislative and judicial branches do with a rogue president that decides he's going to set the Constitution aside and assume dictatorial powers?

Apparently, people like Pogo feel that Congress and the Supreme Court should just sit back and let the president take over the government. But a lot of people (including most Hondurans) feel the thing to do would be to arrest the president and press charges. Had he not fled the country, they could've done so.

This wasn't a military coup -- this was the Honduran government trying to save itself from a would-be dictator. And yet Obama is siding with the dictator, rather than the Honduran congress and Supreme Court. It amazes me that he's choosing to stand with Chavez and Castro -- two of Latin America's most dictatorial rulers. The fact that they're defending Zelaya so strongly tells you something.

Think it can't happen here? Look what the Democrats submitted to Congress in January -- a bill to repeal the 22nd Amendment:

http://www.opencongress.org/bill/111-hj5/show

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Today they suspended these rights.

1. The right to protest.
2. Freedom in one's home from unwarranted search, seizure and arrest.
3. Freedom of association.
4. Guarantees of rights of due process while under arrest.
5. Freedom of transit in the country.

Reminds me of Reagan calling those terrorist contras the equivalent of our founding fathers.

I'll tell you what, anytime a government changes hands by arresting and beating up the president in the middle of the night before shipping him out of the country in his PJs things aren't all kosher.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/al-giordano/honduras-coup-congress-er_b_22...

PS some congressman introducing a bill that never makes it out of committee doesn't make it "the democrats" reminds me of those kooky fear emails of amunition taxes or gun census. Tinfoil hat time.

expatriate's picture
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Honduras -- the rest of the story

So you feel that once a president is elected democratically, he's entitled to start writing his own constitution in defiance of Congress and the Supreme Court?

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

No.

But then he hadn't yet now had he. He was simply holding a referendum to see how the population felt. Constitutional scholars at our own state department think one way, and the coup plotters think another. Hmm.

Honduras has been controlled by a ruling class for decades, they own the congress and supreme court. The population is behind the ousted prez, only way to keep a lid on is violent repression. Here goes.

expatriate's picture
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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Constitutional scholars in the US DOS aren't the ones to interpret the Honduran constitution. The Honduran Supreme Court and Congress are -- and they both told Zelaya he was out of line.

The "coup plotters" you reference are the elected Honduran government and the Supreme Court -- not a couple generals who decided to take over the country.

If Chinese scholars decided our congress and supreme court weren't interpreting the US constitution properly, do they become the authority for the world to take action against us?

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Honduras -- the rest of the story

Expat wrote,

Quote:
The "coup plotters" you reference are the elected Honduran government and the Supreme Court -- not a couple generals who decided to take over the country.

This really is the difference. This was not your typical cigar chomping revolutionary who just decided to take over for the "good of the people" like has become typical in small south american countries. Weather or not they will last or be any better than the old regime remains to be seen though. There are good and bad points on both sides of this. Any time a government is overthrown there's allways problems, casualties and compromise. Time will tell.

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