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Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Expatriate ... interesting. So, it seems like the answer would still be ..."cough these people up, or else" ... but probably real DIFFICULT to implement on the ground without going all out.

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Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Way OT, but this topic already is...

Anyway yesterday I learned that Qutb went to college at UNC (That's University of Nothern Colorado, Greeley). Anyway I guess his experience there negatively influenced his impression of western society. I find it remarkable that basically the philosphical founder of what we would call al queda today was educated at UNC.

If you don't know UNC's guy to girl ratio is about roughly 8 to 1, maybe 4 to 1 on an off year. Average guy would equate this golden ratio with paradise. Qutb on the other hand never married, went back to Egypt and started a revolution. Wacko.

Foot notes in history.....

On another topic, Islam will never rule the world. Ever. Why? Because America is filled with liberal-women who will get real pissed off when they learn that Islam believes Men are the managers of women's affairs ....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayyid_Qutb

This has great tangents, do you as a guy want to hang around with other guys that want to manage women's affairs? THIS IS NOT NORMAL. Every guy I know wants out of women's affairs at the first exit opportunity.

Anyway, when liberal-ladies-of-america-united finally figure out what radical islam is really up to, they'll blow the mujahideen away faster than you can spell menstruation. I love my liberal sisters in arms, they are our last defense.

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Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Thanks bitmasher for the refreshing submission.

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Hiroshima & Nagasaki

What's amazing is that Qutb became convinced of America's moral depravity during his visit between 1948 and 1950. I can only imagine his reaction if he saw it today -- but that's another discussion.

We're actually not that far off topic. Like our experience in the Pacific in WWII, we're currently facing an enemy convinced of its cultural superiority and divine mission. Like WWII Japan, our enemy today also believes it's glorious to die for the cause, and today's enemy shows the same veneration for its suicide bombers that the Japanese showed the kamikaze.

During WWII, however, we were a nation united in the belief that we hold the keys to goodness in the world. We had the will to commit national level effort toward Japan's defeat. We also had the guts to make the tough call needed to make an ugly choice that had to be made in order to bring the war to its conclusion.

Yesterday was the 61st anniversary of Emperor Hirihito's address to his nation announcing Japan's decision to surrender. He made that decision on the belief that nuclear weapons would eradicate Japanese culture. His radio address and later denunciation of his divinity were a massive culture shift for Japan. Japan didn't just lose the war -- they lost a god in the process.

Today we face a similar choice -- are we willing to do what's needed to strike at the heart of a fanatical enemy and break his will? My gut says no -- we're too politically correct to admit that this is a religious war, much less base military strategy on undermining this key center of gravity. During WWII, today's crop of political opportunists would've been claiming that the war was Roosevelt's fault, and that Hiroshima and Nagasaki (or for that matter Tokyo, Dresden, or any number of other cities in Europe) were barbaric, disproportionate uses of force.

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Hiroshima & Nagasaki
expatriate wrote:
... My gut says no -- we're too politically correct to admit that this is a religious war, ...

I suggested once to an active LTCOL (Special Forces warrior) that this is a religious war, and I instantly found myself in such deep S#!% that I feared somewhat for my life and the life of my family.

Therefore (my gut says) we will lose this war.

Ughhhh.

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Hiroshima & Nagasaki

"Winning" is a subjective term. I don't think it's possible to achieve victory in the classical sense, because we're living in a much more chaotic world fighting an enemy that doesn't have centralized government. So it's not like we can "win" in the sense that the bad guys surrender and the boys come home.

Winning this conflict, IMO, could be defined in multiple ways. For instance, the other side could decide it's not worth the pain to keep it going. But given the religious nature of the conflict (at least they view it as a religious war), I don't know how long that would take. Look how long the IRA kept at it. Another way to win would be for states harboring these fiends to start clamping down on them. As long as the bad guys wield political power in those nations, that might be tough to do. Places like Pakistan and Lebanon have their constituencies to consider.

Personally, I tend to agree with Samuel Huntington. What we're seeing now could be the beginnings of a much broader conflict fought as a clash between cultures -- in this case, Islam vs. the West. Huntington started this line of thought in 1993 and expanded it in his 1996 book "The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order." He also predicted future conflict along another significant cultural fault line -- that between the West and China. From that perspective, we're in for the long haul.

In the meantime, I think it was Henry Kissenger who said we could lose in Vietnam by not winning, but the enemy could win by not losing. That seems to be true today as well. Another quote that comes to mind was from the IRA after an unsuccessful attack on Margaret Thatcher's life. They released message afterward saying something to the effect of, "You got lucky today. But just remember -- you have to be lucky every day. We only have to be lucky once."