13 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined: 12/19/2005
Posts: 10
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

With all deference to those that are usually reading this section I've got a question regarding thoughts on which ammo/bullet to purchase. I recently upgraded from my .243 to a 300 weatherby. I typically hunt whitetail/mulie in Nebraska (200lbs plus is the typical deer I've taken over the past few years) and have a pronghorn hunt planned for 2006 and an elk hunt planned for 2007. I'm looking to purchase one cartridge combo that I can get comfortable with that I can use on all of the above. I realize that there are compromises within this, but I'm a believer in simplifying my equipment. From what I've read there seems to be a consensus regarding 180gr as the best all around bullet weight for preserving the maximum usable meat. However, am totally confused as to the variety of different bullets, etc. Would like to get one round that I can buy off the shelf that I can utilize for my variety of hunting scenarios. thanks for the help in advance....

Offline
Moderator
Location: Nova Scotia
Joined: 08/17/2002
Posts: 1762
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

180 gr. is a good all-around weight bullet for 30 cal. You will find your best choices in the premium grade factory loads that remington, federal, and winchester are making and they are made very well. Get a well made bullet like the partition, accubond, etc. and then you have to decide if the cartridge you chose is going to shoot well enough for your hunting/shooting needs.

bitmasher's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: Colorado
Joined: 02/27/2002
Posts: 2973
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

180 would be fine, probably in something like a partition or an accubond. Interbond if you like hornady. I think 165 gr would be fine for the species listed with the same bullet choices (some would argue with that on elk).

Offline
Moderator
Location: Wa.
Joined: 03/31/2004
Posts: 1300
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

I go along with both recomendations. Use the Partition or bonded core bullet in either 165gr or 180gr that shoots the best out of your rifle.
If your not sure of the brands that are available for your rifle. The store clerks would, more than likely, be will to show you what is available and explain them to you.

Offline
Joined: 12/19/2005
Posts: 10
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

Thanks for the help guys...much appreciated....heading out to a few shops this weekend based upon your advice.

Don Fischer's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3190
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

I'm not a magnum fan but have had my bout of magnumitis. I always thought that the best bullet for a 300mag of any kind was a 200gr. A 300mag can drive that big bullet fairly fast and it delivers a lot of energy. I'd also go with a premium bullet, either the Nosler partition or one of the bonded core bullet's. Actually having gone to a 300 Weatherby rather than a 300 win or even a 30-06, I think I'd give a lot of though to handloading. Your gonna get sticker shock looking at Weatherby ammo.

Offline
Joined: 12/19/2005
Posts: 10
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

While the ammo isn't cheap it's still not to bad if you shop online....thought long and hard about this before going to this rifle...if I want to plink I'll either shoot .22lr or pick up a .308 ar style rifle (if I sell my .243)....either of which I can shoot for pennies a round...this leaves me shooting maybe 20 .300 wby rounds per year figure 5-8 refresher rounds before the season and two max in season....since I don't take running shots, etc and only take a shot where I know I can put the animal down with one round (have 4 deer in the last 5 years on 4 .243 shells...one of which was a 75 grain bullet) thus IMHO price of ammo for your primary hunting rifle shouldn't be an issue. I'm certaint that there are others that insist you should put 100 rounds down range per annum with your primary rifle I just don't share that view.....thank God for the Boy Scouts letting me put 1000's of .22 lr downrange each summer growing up for .02 per round...that is back when a $20 bill for summer camp got you all you could shoot!

Don Fischer's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3190
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

Ah,have you shot one yet? I found out years ago that the best way to learn to handle hard recoiling cartridges is to shoot them a lot. The 300 Weatherby will likely recoil a bit, no make that a lot!!!!!!!!!!!! Guy's that claim that this magnum or that doesn't recoil much shoot a lot, they are so used to, it doesn't bother them anymore. Five sighter rounds just befor hunting may well teach you to flinch if that's all you shoot it a year!

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 11/09/2005
Posts: 166
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

Yes, you have to shoot a lot, but shooting too much at one sitting can teach you to flinch also. At least, it does me.

I have found that, when shooting a hard-recoiling firearm, I need to focus hard on not flinching, and then I have to take a break after every dozen or so rounds. If I don't, I just start flinching more and more.

Don Fischer's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3190
Help Selecting Factory Ammo

When I got my first 338mag, all I could handle at first was 3 rounds. Worked my way up to 5 in about a couple weeks. When I got rid of it I could shoot 20 from the bench. The first three brusied my shoulder so bad it took several days to go away.

That was about 35 yrs ago. I was a young man in the military. 5' 11" tall and about 185#. At that time I though that if I could handle my 7mm Mag, the 338 shouldn't be to bad,,,,,,,,,huh!!!!!!!!!!!! Handling recoil is a learned thing and to much from the bench will teach you to flinch.

Offline
Moderator
Location: Nova Scotia
Joined: 08/17/2002
Posts: 1762
Help Selecting Factory Ammo
Don Fischer wrote:
Ah,have you shot one yet? I found out years ago that the best way to learn to handle hard recoiling cartridges is to shoot them a lot. The 300 Weatherby will likely recoil a bit, no make that a lot!!!!!!!!!!!! Guy's that claim that this magnum or that doesn't recoil much shoot a lot, they are so used to, it doesn't bother them anymore. Five sighter rounds just befor hunting may well teach you to flinch if that's all you shoot it a year!

I couldn't agree more!! Thumbs up If you are ever going to get used to that rifle you have to shoot that rifle. .22 plinking is great for form and enjoyment and I recommend it to anybody but you need to be familiar with the rifle you intend to use. Five shots a year is not going to allow you to do that. I have a 300 RUM and it has a bit of recoil lol lol . I have learned to shoot that rifle well but the key word is I "learned". It is not the same as grabbing the .22 or any of my no magnum rifles. As stated, you have to concentrate when shooting these calibers or you will get some bad habits that you may not even know you're getting.

Related Forum Threads You Might Like

ThreadThread StarterRepliesLast Updated
Performance of my first reloadsCVC305/21/2007 17:40 pm
Bulk Ammo?hostage67512/10/2006 22:20 pm
Factory Ammo For Salejakolb002/02/2010 08:57 am
Ammo for 7mm Weatherby Magjigman208/27/2005 17:51 pm
CZ 550 Safari 375 H&H Mag.-What Ammo to Use?tgs989011/20/2008 00:37 am