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Joined: 10/04/2006
Posts: 1
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)

Kentucky F&W has updated their deer processing show and now have it available on DVD. It's an hour long and covers everything from field dressing/gutting, skinning, deboning and meat processing. The video is produced by the Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife and is available online at http://www.fw.ky.gov

http://fw.ky.gov/video/dvdspecial.wmv?lid=1660&NavPath=C105C191

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Location: upstate New York
Joined: 06/21/2006
Posts: 140
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)

I always hang mine head down. One reason the heat will rise out of the chest cavity. The other main reason is it looks like an outlaw strung up hanging on a noose. Especially if it is a doe. My opinion but , I think you should give them more respect.
I try and hang them for at least 5 days weather permitting. If it is to warm I will quarter it up and keep it in a spare fridge for a week to age. I bone mine all out . Threats of CWD in the area. The only bone I saw is though the hind quarters to separate them. I also use a vacuum sealer. They work great and save time.

tim
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Location: north idaho
Joined: 06/11/2004
Posts: 601
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)

I guess different strokes for different folks. I try to have the animal in the freezer within 2 days. Most people don't have a walkin with a controlled temp. So hanging deer has always scared me. Shoot, field dress and butcher as soon as possible.

novice

once you get the deer handled the other big game animals are pretty much the same. Just more time for bigger size bodies.

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Location: Spokane, Wa
Joined: 09/15/2006
Posts: 9
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)

So what type of set up do you guys use when butchering your deer? I know people who do it while they are hanging and some who butcher it on a table. Which way is easier?

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Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Joined: 11/06/2005
Posts: 24
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)

I like to hang mine head down (in halves or quarters) in my friend's garage for 3-4-5 days depending on the size of the deer and the ambient temp. By Nov. it's cold enough in Saskatchewan. I butcher them on a table, wrap in butcher paper and put it in the freezer. I usually make about 80 lbs of sausage with 2 deer and eat the rest as steak, roasts, kebabs, jerky, ground round, etc. The last few years I started to make pate if I shoot a young one as liver and onions gets boring after a couple of feeds. I bought a commercial saw, (Biro model 11) last year but don't have it set up yet so I do it all with a saw, cleaver and a good set of knives. I like to cool the chest cavity quickly by propping it open while I go get my car, and then skinning it as soon as i get it home and washing it off well with water and a clean towel. The most common comment I recieve is that my deer meat does not taste a bit gamey so I don't think I'm going to change anything. I've been doing it the same way for 36 years now so I'm not sure I could anyway! lol

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Location: Grandfalls NewBrunswick
Joined: 09/29/2006
Posts: 33
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)
bdvictor wrote:
Kentucky F&W has updated their deer processing show and now have it available on DVD. It's an hour long and covers everything from field dressing/gutting, skinning, deboning and meat processing. The video is produced by the Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife and is available online at http://www.fw.ky.gov

http://fw.ky.gov/video/dvdspecial.wmv?lid=1660&NavPath=C105C191

An hour does'nt seem to long for this type of video. Have you seen it? is it worth buying? Does it leave you will more questions than answers after seeing it? Think

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Location: Upper Peninsula of Michigan
Joined: 01/13/2007
Posts: 368
Butchering deer

I have been butchering both deer and bear for myself and others for nearly forty years. I had a good introduction to butchering through a butchering course offered by Community Schools. Over the years my techniques have evolved. My son-in-law and I are now operating a small scale butchering service. We have electric hoists to hang deer and bear for skinning and butchering (in a garage with fourteen foot celing). We hang most deer head down if they are still warm as they skin easily. For a cold deer, we hang by the head and use the hoist to pull the hide off, then hang head down. We remove the front shoulders while they are hanging and usually remove the back straps and inner loins as well. The carcass is then moved to a wooden butchering block for further break down. Since we are not far from Wisconsin and even though CWD has not showed up in Michigan, we bone out all meat and use a saw as little as possible. If we are both working, I am usually boning out the front shoulders for stew or grind and trimming off fat and connective tissue on a seperate table.
We use a vacuum sealer to package meat. We have found that this prevents freezer burn. We have a commercial grinder and grind meat for our clients, packaging it in plastic tube bags. We only make sausage for our own use.
Auctions and going-out-of-business sales are good places to buy commercial butchering equipment. Working alone, it takes me four to four and a half hours to skin and process a deer, including grinding. I enjoy working with meat and I know the meat is treated properly.

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Location: Kentucky/ Colorado
Joined: 06/23/2005
Posts: 1740
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)

Old Professor, Thanks for your imput and Welcome to BGH! Big smile

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Location: Sneads, Florida
Joined: 11/13/2006
Posts: 122
A Guide to Butchering Deer (Feature Article)

I always butcher my own deer. I usually kill it and then go straight to the hanger. I have never field dressed my deer. Ofcourse I usually only have a 2 mile drive to the hanger. I did not understand in the original story why you would want to cut the deer down the middle. I have never done this. I always, skin, gut, quarter, get the backstrap and then the loins. I dont keep the ribs or the neck. After this I place in plastic bags and stick in iced down cooler. The meat will usually stay in there for 3-4 days.(until I get home) I then bone out all the meat. I cube most and grind the rest. I have never had any problems at all with the meat. I also use a vacuum sealer.

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Location: novascotia
Joined: 05/03/2006
Posts: 682
butchering your deer

We have always left the gut pile for the crows and bald eagle . then straight home to remove the hide so the meat will cool as quick as possibable . I always take the heart and liver with me , the birds don't get that . Then we bone out the front half for burger and the the rest is boned and sliced to fyr or what ever way we want it cooked . This year we will have a good meat grinder so we don't have to take it to the butcher to make our burger .

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