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Joined: 08/31/2004
Posts: 3
Ground blinds

I am a treestand hunter from down south, but as a new resident to Montana I am considering hunting from a ground blind. I was wondering what makes some blinds better than others. I'm thinking weight and set-up time are the two most important features to me, but I would like to hear first-hand from people who have hunted from blinds before. There are a lot of blinds available and I'm just not sure which one to choose. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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Joined: 09/10/2004
Posts: 4
Ground blinds

I use a ground blind for hunting deer, elk and antelope and have been extremely succesful. Many of the areas in MontanaI hunt, do not have trees large enought to support a tree stand. I own a Double Bull T2 blind, which is one of the more expensive blinds to buy. I bought it for its quality and durability. It is also big enough for two hunter to use and it keeps you out of the wind, rain and bugs.

I set it up on trails, wallows and watering holes. You just have to make sure to set it up, so it fits in with the surrounding environment the best you can.

I hope this helps,

Dan

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Joined: 08/31/2004
Posts: 3
Ground blinds

Dan,

Thanks for your information. I looked at the Double Bull blinds, but I just could not justify the cost, being a first time blind purchase. I can tell the quality is better than other blinds, but for now I went with one called the Hunter's Den by Hunter's View. It's a two man blind also. I may wish I had went with the more expensive blind later on, but I figure I'll give this one a try for now. I can't wait to try it out! Thanks again...I thought no one was ever going to reply!

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Joined: 09/10/2004
Posts: 4
Your welcome

I can completely understand your concrens regarding the cost of a Double Bull blind. Living in Montana allows me to use mine over thirty days a year, so I wanted something that would stand up to the weather and my abuse.

Ground blind hunting is very rewarding, but make sure you cover your blind and yourself with plenty of scent eliminator sprays. Do not go potty anywhere around your blind and try not to drink coffee or eat foods with any significant odors, i.e: salami, smoked fish, jerky, etc. I use decoys and scents to help attract animals if I am not on water. Find a good trail, water hole wallow away from the beaten path and set your blind about 20 yards away from it. Take range finder readings on different land marks around it, so you know your distances. I set and read while waiting, which is good way to pass the time.

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Joined: 08/31/2004
Posts: 3
Ground blinds

Dan,

I've got my new blind setting up outside "airing out". I think I'll leave it out there for about a week to get that new smell worn off. Do you open up all of the shooting holes in your blind, or do you keep it to a minimum? It looks to me like it may be fairly easy for the game to see inside the blind if you have a lot of windows opened up. I'm looking forward to doing some turkey hunting with my bow from this blind!

Thanks for the information!

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