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Joined: 12/07/2003
Posts: 69
Firat aid kit

Last night I cut my finger quite badly and as I do carry band aids they just so happened to be in my other back pack. But this job would have been a little big for just a few band aids. so my question is.....

First aid kit who brings one and if you do what does it contain?

P.S. Hunt safe Please :-? it is looking like I will be missing a few days. Cry

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Location: Starbuck, MN
Joined: 10/29/2004
Posts: 7
Firat aid kit

Man just when I thought my pack was full enough already now I have to look for a First Aid Kit.

As you can tell I don't carry one and up until now it never dawned on me that I would need one. I have one in my tackle box for fishing but only after I sunk a treble hook into my thumb that I had to cut out to continue fishing. Thank goodness we had TP and duck tape.

I am interested in seeing what others have as well. Good question. Big smile

expatriate's picture
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Location: Arizona
Joined: 10/26/2002
Posts: 3206
Firat aid kit

I carry one, but it's not much. It's generally a few bandaids, antiseptic, etc -- enough to take care of minor cuts, a small wound from a fall, etc. I'll also throw in some tylenol and sudafed to deal with headaches and congestion. I'm mostly concerned with preventing a minor thing from interfering with my day or getting infected and keeping me out of the field.

My first aid kit also includes a lighter, a magnesium block, and a space blanket. Serious injury can mean shock and/or an extended wait for help to arrive -- you've gotta be able to stay warm.

All told, it probably all adds up to a quarter pound or so -- not much to it, but enough to deal with a lot of things.

If I had one thing to add, though, it would be some of that blood clotting agent like Quik Clot. It's expensive, but it's used on the battlefield and stops massive blood loss quickly. Of the life-threatening scenarios I can imagine, accidental gunshot wounds or knife accidents top the list because you can bleed out long before help can arrive. For that matter, a broadhead can turn on your pretty quick, too. The chances of ever needing it are low, but it's one of those things a guy would be willing to pay any price for if needed.

A lot of things can be endured until help arrives, especially if you can deal with shock and prevent exposure. But arterial bleeds don't give you much time, and you can't assume you can use your belt as a tourniquet for everything.

Location: Minnesota,
Joined: 08/28/2004
Posts: 259
Firat aid kit

I never thought of that either, now you got me all paranoid!But I do have a first aid kit in my truck for work and the other guys in our party are within shouting range. Where would a guy get that Quick clot stuff? I've never heard of it

expatriate's picture
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Location: Arizona
Joined: 10/26/2002
Posts: 3206
Firat aid kit

Maybe I'm just overly pessimistic, but I've heard a couple horror stories -- like the guy who fell on his knife and hit his femoral artery.

Quikclot has been coming onto the consumer market fairly recently as it has proven itself on the battlefield and with first responders as a means of rapidly controlling massive blood loss. You pour the stuff right into the wound and, for maximum effect, cover it up with a compression bandage. It works by sucking the moisture out of the blood and encouraging rapid (i.e. seconds) coagulation. It's non-toxic, etc, and when the patient gets to the hospital they can irrigate it out of the wound in a controlled environment.

It has been hitting the consumer market in a couple forms, either as packets or as a "battle pack" comprising a pack of Quikclot, a couple gauze pads, a compression bandage, and a carrying pouch. Looks like the powder goes for $20-25 a pack, and battle packs run around $40-50. Do a Google search on Quikclot and you'll find suppliers. A couple places I've seen it is at http://www.quanticoarms.com and at http://www.uscav.com. If you want to learn more about the product, check out http://www.quikclot.com

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Joined: 10/31/2004
Posts: 24
Firat aid kit

Easy guys...the best thing for massive bleeding is direct pressure and getting help fast. It would be better to spend 20-30 bucks on a good quality outdoor first-aid course and the same amount on two-way radios or a cell phone. Quikclot may be useful in certain situations but it would be a shame to bleed out from a wound while digging in your pack for the stuff instead of getting the hemorage controlled immediately with direct pressure.

I'm a surgeon - I work in a trauma ER - we use direct pressure to stop bleeding.

expatriate's picture
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Location: Arizona
Joined: 10/26/2002
Posts: 3206
Firat aid kit

I never suggested it as a replacement for pressure -- but it'd be a lot better than pressure alone.

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Joined: 10/31/2004
Posts: 24
Firat aid kit

I discussed Quikclot with some folks at work today. One point brought up by a very experienced Army trauma surgeon (who has direct clinical experience with the product) is that the highly exothermic reaction that occurs with the Quikclot can damage the local tissue by burning it. Exothermic means that it makes heat. Damaging local muscle may not be much of a concern but right next to that femoral artery in the groin is the femoral nerve. Burn that sucker up and you lose the ability to extend your knee - possible permanently. There are many cases in human anatomy where other important structures are colocated with major arteries.

expatriate's picture
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Location: Arizona
Joined: 10/26/2002
Posts: 3206
Firat aid kit

Now that's interesting. I'd heard nothing about that, and it's funny the things the marketing people don't tell you. That's a good thing to know, especially if you apply it and the victim starts fighting and screaming because it's irritating that nerve. Maybe it's in one of those legal disclaimers down in the fine print.

maineguide's picture
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Location: Downeast, ME USA
Joined: 09/03/2002
Posts: 330
Firat aid kit

When I take people out in the field or on a body of water I carry a first aid kit.
Other than that I just carry about 1/2 doz band aids in my wallet.
They don't take up much room.

bitmasher's picture
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Location: Colorado
Joined: 02/27/2002
Posts: 2973
Firat aid kit

Hey now that's fascinating! Quickclot doesn't appear to be hiding the heat generation, its discussed in a journal of tramua article directly linked on their site. Go here, on the lower right side:

http://www.quikclot.com/productinfo/clinicalstudies.htm

By using zeolite with residual moisture (i'm reading that to mean that they are pre-treating the zeolite with some water for a partially hydrated lattice), this reduces the heat generation over completely dry zeolite, without reducing the clotting rate. It appears this rm-zeolite may be a new version of the quikclot, but i haven't investigated it enough.

Another point to note is that this appears to be a hydration reaction which will be retarded by excess heat rather than advanced (like combustion). So while the potential to cook down your wound exists, as Bonedoc mentioned, this isn't the same as say pouring gasoline in your wound and throwing in a match. Very different chemistry going on here...

I concur with BoneDoc about "the best thing for massive bleeding is direct pressure and getting help fast", but it appears that quikclot is intended for where one or both of these factors is missing. In other words, you can't get pressure on the wound, because you've lost your mind (or don't know how), and your hunting partner is going to pieces too, to make matters worse your hours from help. In this scenario, which presumably happens far to often in combat situations (otherwise what's the point of this product?), quickclot appears to play an important roll. Its for helping people that are not professionals and have no chance of getting to one before its too late.