6 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined: 11/30/2006
Posts: 2
A Few questions

First let me say that i would like to go the more traditional route with a cap lock but because of cost i think I'm going to go with a Lower price HR or CVA inline 50 cal. i have read good things about the HR Sidekick and the CVA Wolf leaning more toward the HR because i like the wood better then composit and it sorta looks like a Hawken's. I have never shot a muzzeloader with a projectile ( fired rev war re-enacter flint lock once) i know very little about the characteristic about different projectiles but i fell i would rather go with a Slug or Ball than a Sabot conical to be a bit more traditional and the slug because of more weight. the style of hunting i have grown up with is shotgun in the thick with sporadic open lines of sight mostly taking stands waiting for the deer to get close.

Also what do people know about the kits. I find allot of Traditions but i was leaning more toward getting a Cabin Creek Especially after reading Traditions is off shored. I want to get one that is 54cal when i do ( i have a 54 cal mini ball mold).

thanks for any insight

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 11/09/2005
Posts: 166
A Few questions

Once again I will say that the very first thing you need to do is check the regulations in the state in which you live and/or want to hunt. Most have a variety of restrictions on what can and cannot be used during the muzzleloader season. Most gun shop salespeople haven't got the first clue what those restrictions are, and almost ALL gun shops sell stuff for muzzleloaders that is illegal to use for hunting in their state.

Second, I will say that you need to shop around a little more. There are a number of traditionally styled guns out there that are not one penny more expensive than the cheapest of the inlines. If you want a traditional gun then there's no reason not to get one. Check Cabela's, check Dixie Gun Works, check Midsouth Shooters Supply--they all have very reasonably priced, traditionally styled guns.

You need a different rate of twist in the barrel, depending on whether you are shooting round balls or conicals, and even depending on whether you are shooting short conicals or long conicals. The basic rule is, the longer the projectile, the faster the rate of twist should be. Barrels made for round balls typically have a rate of twist in the 1:60 - 1:70 range. Barrels made for conicals typically have a rate of twist in the 1:30 - 1:40 range. "Compromise" barrels, that supposedly can shoot either conicals or round balls, typically have a rate of twist of 1:48 or so. Note that these "compromise" barrels truly are a compromise, in the sense that they shoot both adequately, but they don't really shoot either all that well. Generally they work best with very short conicals.

Good luck!

Offline
Joined: 11/30/2006
Posts: 2
A Few questions

i have check the regulation in maine where i live

Quote:
Only muzzleloading firearms that are 40 caliber or greater and capable of firing only a single charge may be used to hunt deer during this season. Muzzleloading firearm means a firearm that is capable of being loaded only through the muzzle; is ignited by a matchlock, wheel lock, flintlock, or caplock, including an in-line caplock or shotgun or rifle primer mechanism; has a rifled or smooth-bored barrel capable of firing only a single charge; propels a ball, bullet, or charge of shot;and may have any type of sights, including scopes.

I'm still haveing touble finding a Cap Lock that is not a $100 or more then the HR Sidekick unless i get a one of the Traditions Deer Hunter from Midsouth. also i realy dont want a sythetic stock which is proably making it harder. most of the Trditional rifles im finding have a 1:48twist. As for a Projectial from what i have read the TC Maxi Ball or Maxi Hunter is what i was thinking about going with.

Offline
Location: Southern California
Joined: 12/02/2006
Posts: 39
Here are a few more questions

Hi guys. Wave
I'm new to this forum and to muzzleloaders, but not to big game hunting. A couple of questions for you all:

I'll be hunting elk in Colorado next fall in the muzzleloader season, and am going to pick up either Cabela's Sporterized Hawken Hunter (28" barrel) or their Carbine (21" barrel), in 54 caliber. The carbine appeals to me because 1) it's different, and 2) it's smaller and lighter, which would be an advantage for the kind of hunting I do in Colorado (lots of climbing around, between 8000 and 11,000 feet). Shots would hopefully be within 50 yards, and I don't think I'd take any over 100 yards. Apparently, the 21" barrel loses about 100 fps over the 28" barrel. So question #1 is: How critical is that 100 fps, and would going with the carbine be pushing my luck? Also, I wonder how much the carbine would limit my hunting in other, future situations Think

Question #2 is about shooting conicals. They need to be lubed, but I can't seem to find a straight-forward answer anywhere on whether they require a patch or not. What's the deal?

I'd appreciate any thoughts on either of these issues. Thanks!

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 11/09/2005
Posts: 166
A Few questions

I use a .54 Lyman Great Plains Hunter with 1:32 twist, and shoot Thompson, 430 grain Maxi-Balls in front of 90 grains of ffg. I do not use patches and they shoot very well. I have never experimented with patches, but I doubt it would shoot significantly better with them, though it wouldn't hurt to try.

I sincerely doubt that 100 fps difference would matter. A muzzleloader is fundamentally a short-range rifle and I don't think 100 fps is going to make a difference in shots of less than 125 yards or so.

I have taken several elk over the years with my muzzleloader and the longest shot I've ever taken was about 75 yards. That shot went straight through the lungs and out the other side. The elk sort of stood there wobbling for a few seconds, took about a half a step, and keeled over on the spot. Needless to say, I'm quite satisfied with my rifles performance.

Offline
Location: Southern California
Joined: 12/02/2006
Posts: 39
A Few questions

Thanks, for the response, denver d0n!

Offline
Location: Levack, Ontario, Canada
Joined: 12/26/2006
Posts: 24
A Few questions

I think the weight of the extra 7 inches of barrel will make little noticeable difference when carried around. Where the terimnal ballistic gain is small....it may make the difference depending on your choice of projectile.

Related Forum Threads You Might Like