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Location: Northern Minnesota
Joined: 07/08/2007
Posts: 325
Favorite hunting knife..

What make, style etc. is your best / favorite hunting knife? How do you sharpen it?

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3183
Favorite hunting knife..

I have a number of knives. My favorites are Schrade folders. Toss up between my old bone handle Schrade and my Uncle Henry. For pocket knives I like to old Old Timers. Have a number of others too plus one custom. Always grab the Schrades.

Shapren on an oil stone then polish on Hard Arkansas. Had a sharpning system that used 400 grit wet/dry paper and a leather strop and like it very well.

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Location: Eatonville, Wa
Joined: 08/26/2007
Posts: 610
Favorite hunting knife..

Ive got a leatherman for work but for about everything else ive got a kershaw folding knife had it for 3+ years no problem

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
Favorite hunting knife..

I usually carry two knives and a bone saw. Any sturdy folding locking blade or sturdy fixed blade knives with either a clip-point or a drop-point blade 3 1/2" to 4" long will work fine. As long as it feels comfortable in your hand. After using a Buck 110 since childhood, I've finally retired it. In addition I also carry and use a Buck Vanguard and a pack-saw when hunting elk over the last 7 years. I now try to avoid using knives with hardwood or compressed leather handles. I believe the newer rubber or polymer thermal plastic handles to be more sanitary, easier to keep clean, disinfect, and not harbor harmful pathogens as easily.

Replaced the Buck 110 with a Gerber Magnum LST that was given to me as a stocking stuffer this past Christmas. I really like it. Very good sturdy knife, light weight, and not real pricey either. I've come to appreciate the drop-point style blade on the Gerber, it appears to be a very versitile shape for both gutting and skinning. Of course the real test will come in a few weeks if I fill both my deer tags.

For sharpening? A new knife with a keen edge and good bevel established on it's edge should only need to be dressed with a fine meat packers steel or a fine ceramic sharpening rod. As the edge wears down over time the sharpening steel or cermamic rod will no longer produce a sharp edge. You must now hone the edge using first a course stone then next with a fine stone. Use diamond stones with newer stainless steel blades and use Arkansas stones with traditional carbon steel blades. The number 1 key to a sharp edge is to keep the blade at a contant and consistant angle while honing. If the angle deviates or wavers any, you will not get any good results. Finally finish up the edge with a very fine (smooth) sharpening steel or fine ceramic rod.

My knives have HC stainless steel blades. However I've always appreciated the qualities of good old traditional carbon tool steel used in older knife blades. You can get those old blades literally razor hair-shaving sharp with only moderate effort on a honing stone. While carbon steel may not hold it's edge quite as long as the newer stainless steel, and carbon steel will discolor with use and even develope surface rust if not properly cared for. Nothing that an occasional buffing with 0000 fine steel wool can't take care of. I still find carbon steel to be a practical and good choice for a knife. Schrade knives are no longer made, so if you can find a new-old-stock or a used one in good condition then get it.

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Joined: 07/31/2007
Posts: 635
Favorite hunting knife..

My favorites are my Bear & Son pocket knife (just like an old timer), and my Remington fixed drop point with a nice rose handle. I use my Greatgrandfathers wet stone to sharpen all my blades.

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Moderator
Location: Wa.
Joined: 03/31/2004
Posts: 1300
Favorite hunting knife..

All Schrades / Old timers and Waldens. Hard to beat. It was a sad day when they quit.

For hunting I have a 2 knife 2 1/2" - 3 1/2" set and a 2 knife 3 1/2" - 5 1/2" set that are used for dressing and skinning only and a 5 1/2" do everything else.

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Location: Northern Minnesota
Joined: 07/08/2007
Posts: 325
Favorite knife

I have an old Marble. I wish I knew the age of it. Used to belong to my father. It holds an edge longer than my newer knives, but I worry about loosing it so it stays at home.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
Favorite hunting knife..

I love those old Marbles knives too. Have a Marbles Woodcraft from about the late 1940's. They used some real good tough ball-bearing steel in those blades, and the convex grind that they have is just something that you don't see on too many knives today, even custom made ones. Really sturdy and heafty blades. I don't use mine for hunting because the blade is just what i consider to be too big for my tastes in a hunting knife.

bitmasher's picture
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Location: Colorado
Joined: 02/27/2002
Posts: 2973
Favorite hunting knife..

Buck 110 FG.

maineguide's picture
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Location: Downeast, ME USA
Joined: 09/03/2002
Posts: 330
Favorite hunting knife..

The old style Buck Zipper. I sharpen mine with a Smith's sharpener.

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Location: Montana
Joined: 10/24/2006
Posts: 448
Favorite hunting knife..

Western Hunter,
I hate to correct you but saying carbon steel doesn’t hold an edge like stainless ANY STAINLESS is quite a bit of misinformation.
Any Bladesmith, custom knifemaker or metallurgist can and will tell you just the opposite, including makers that use stainless steel. It is a fact and very well known that the pros of carbon steel is superior edge holding and the con is its not stainless but even at that there isn’t a stainless steel made that wont or cant rust.
The pro of stainless steel is being stain resistant, the con is edge holding. Large scale manufactures make up for this but putting a excessive secondary edge geometry on blades to make up for 1) lack of proper heatreat and 2) lack of carbon content and that maybe why your perception of edge holding is askew, a properly heat treated carbon blade can and should hold a better edge via carbon content at a lesser degree of angle and as scientifically be sharper and hold it longer then same stainless steel blade.

Blackbear, if youd like to read I have 2 articles written about edge holding and sharpening. While I dont say WHAT to use, you should have a clear understanding as why and what for. They are on my links page at the top.
http://www.highcountryknives.com

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