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Location: Arkansas
Joined: 05/04/2003
Posts: 33
Elk Hunting East of Meeker, CO.

Hi gang - I'll be scratching around for wapiti for the first time in my wonderful life and have decided to hunt east of Meeker in units 23, 24 & 12. I've researched the area and talked to a few folks I know who have hunted that region of Colorado. Can anyone provide feedback on the area, i.e. experience with the terrain, weather (hunting 3rd Rifle, Nov. 4 - 10). As always, a big thanks Big smile

Offline
Location: Southern NH
Joined: 09/13/2006
Posts: 380
Some elk....lots of hunters

I've hunted that area for quite a while. We go back every year to the same area. Public ground in the WRNF. Lots of hunters, some elk. Hope for bad weather and be prepared for it. Do you own snowshoes? The best luck we've had is when the weather is the worst. Drives the girly-men off the mountain. Then the odds of getting an elk are a little better. Get a WRNF map and check out the road access.I'm going out third season again. There are places where the odds are better but we would rather hunt where we know the lay of the land better and take our chances.

Offline
Location: Arkansas
Joined: 05/04/2003
Posts: 33
Elk Hunting East of Meeker, CO.

Thanks for the info - and good luck to you out there.

Not a lot of snowshoes here in Arkansas... I'll be sure to bring my breadwrappers

Offline
Location: Southern NH
Joined: 09/13/2006
Posts: 380
snowshoes

Rick,

Sadly, I'm not joking about the snowshoes. There have been two years out of the last five that would have been a bust w/o them where we hunt. I've seen more than a couple guys who thought they were close to death after they got in over waist deep w/o the proper equipment. If we get a lot of snow, you will be confined to the lower elevations. There are elk there, too. And a lot more hunters. If the snow is really deep up high, try the lower elevations in the Flat Tops Wildereness Area. It's all foot travel or horses, no motorized vehicles allowed. A lot of work but it may pay off. On the other hand, it might be shirtsleeve weather.......you never know. Think Good luck on your hunt and be safe!

Don Fischer's picture
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Moderator
Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3200
Elk Hunting East of Meeker, CO.

I think Rick though you ment to keep his feet dry. I used to use bread wrappers too. Big smile I don't think they have ever seen 2' of snow in Arkansas.

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Location: Southern NH
Joined: 09/13/2006
Posts: 380
Hmmmmm

Don,

I think you're right. I didn't mean snow boots, as we used to call them. I meant the other kind of snowshoe, the aluminum and rubber ones with bindings. Something to keep you from sinking in up to your waist. Yes

Offline
Location: Arkansas
Joined: 05/04/2003
Posts: 33
Elk Hunting East of Meeker, CO.

AH! I wasn't thinking snowshoes in the sense you meant, NH... Don was right. My joke was about keeping the feet dry, didn't know you were trying to keep my head above the drifts. Thanks so much guys for sorting this out for me.

Better start looking at Cabela's or Bass Pro to see about coming up with a way to walk on TOP of the snow.

cowgal's picture
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Moderator
Location: Colorado
Joined: 03/10/2002
Posts: 1787
Elk Hunting East of Meeker, CO.

Snowshoes (the kind for walking on top of snow!) can make or break getting around in snow. I like them even with just a foot of snow on the ground, makes walking so much easier.

If you buy some, go for the lightest pair you can afford. I also like the narrower, smaller ones, much easier to walk in them. A pair of inexpensive "gaiters" are a must as well. They go over your shoes or boots and up to your knees. They zip or snap on and will keep your legs dry. Poles are very helpful as well, the kind you use for cross country skiing.

Here is an article you might find helpful:
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/community/inthefield/fieldgu...
scroll to the bottom text links and click on "Put on Some Snowshoes and Go!"

Good Luck! Big smile

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Location: Southern NH
Joined: 09/13/2006
Posts: 380
snow

I usually don't put them on until it's between knee and waist deep. Keep in mind if you go around the North side of a mountain, the snow is liable to be MUCH deeper. It takes a little practice to keep from falling on your face with them but you'll learn quick. You have to walk a little pigeon-toed if you normally walk pronated (toes pointing slightly outward) like me. Otherwise you tend to step on the tail of the other snowshoe and end up falling on your face. I have a set of Atlas 833's and I like them. My buddy uses Atlas 1033's but I like my bindings a lot better. I can get mine on and off twice as fast as he can. You will also need some type of pac boot, like Sorel's. Gaiters are nice. I use them when I'm not using snowshoes. When I'm on snowshoes I find I don't need them so much. You might try spraying something on the heels of the boots if the snow is sticky to keep from building up between the boot and the snowshoe. Maybe WD-40? They are noisier then just walking in boots. One caution...BE CAREFUL IN BLOWDOWNS! If your foot slides off a log and gets wedged down in the blowdown you may have a tough time getting it out. That's the other reason I like my bindings. I can my foot out from behind. You don't want to have to knaw your leg off to get out. Big smile

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 10/05/2004
Posts: 126
Elk Hunting East of Meeker, CO.

Here's my take on those units. There are indeed a whole boatload of animals in there, but unfortuantely, it is perhaps one of the most heavily hunted units in the state. So far, the area(s) have received a good dumping of snow and cold temps. Considering the archery, muzzleloading, first rilfe and second rifle season have pretty much ran these elk and deer all over hell's half acre, they're going to be in some of the nastiest, thickest timer where finding them can be a logistical nightmare OR they're gonna be on private where access is going to be tougher than winning the lottery.
Now depending on what unit you're hunting (I'm suspecting morth of the White River), it can be hit or miss. Personally, I'd hunt in unit 23. 12 can be good earlier, but considering Ripple Creek Pass is over 10,000 ', the snow amounts will most likely pushed them down from their high altitude haunts. Some of the wilderness areas will most liley be better than the easier areas as you can only used foot and horseback travel only, and this will limit alot of guys from venturing in that far. It's not about how far you're willing to pack in, but how far you're willing to pack an animal out.
Flip me a PM if you have any questions......

Boob

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Location: Southern NH
Joined: 09/13/2006
Posts: 380
yep

Boobzilla is right on. The hunting pressure is really high and the animals are not easy to find. I searched all week last year and didn't find fresh tracks until the last day. You'll be drooling all over your shirt when you drive to your hunting area. The private land in the valleys usually has hundreds and hundreds of elk and deer on them........but YOU can't hunt them on private land. Just look the other way and pretend they're not there. sad Then get out and hunt hard. You might get lucky and bag one. So far, it looks like they've had their share of snow already this year. Sounds like it's going to be deep up high. Cabela's is running a clearance on Redfeather snowshoes. $99 for the bigger pair, if they're still in stock. I was looking hard at them but I think I want MSR's for my next pair. Tired of falling off logs. Brick Wall,)

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