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Location: Paris, Arkansas
Joined: 07/20/2008
Posts: 5
Elk hunting coyote style?

The more I hunt Elk the more it drives me nutz! I want to start bow hunting Elk, but I'm 38 and I live at 400ft above sea level, the 3 to 5 mile walks in and out are taking to long to heal these days. I want to go in and hunt till dark and sleep on the ground without burning up energy going back and forth to camp. I have an army alice pack large, and a gortex sleeping bag cover, I also have some survival sleeping bags but thea're extreme weather, how warm of a sleeping bag does a person need during bow seasons and what other gear is good for this type of hunting.

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Location: NEVADA
Joined: 07/06/2008
Posts: 33
Re: Elk hunting coyote style?
ELKNUTZ wrote:
The more I hunt Elk the more it drives me nutz! I want to start bow hunting Elk, but I'm 38 and I live at 400ft above sea level, the 3 to 5 mile walks in and out are taking to long to heal these days. I want to go in and hunt till dark and sleep on the ground without burning up energy going back and forth to camp. I have an army alice pack large, and a gortex sleeping bag cover, I also have some survival sleeping bags but thea're extreme weather, how warm of a sleeping bag does a person need during bow seasons and what other gear is good for this type of hunting.

I guess it depends on where you're going to hunt. Arizona, stays pretty warm durning the Archery, Colorado, I'm sure gets into the 40's at night. I think Coyote Style is a fun way to do it. I always have my family with me, so it makes it hard for me to do that. I just have to tough it out. I'm 39, but most of us out West are tough as nails in comparison to anything out East or South Big smile Just playing with you.

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Location: Colorado
Joined: 02/27/2002
Posts: 2973
Elk hunting coyote style?

It will get cold depending on the elevation, however if you plan to stay out for awhile, I'd be more concerned about water. Its heavy and you consume a lot. Bring along some sort of water filter system.

The other issue is staying dry, fall brings more rain to the high country and at the least thicker morning dew which gets you soaked. If your not dry going into night fall, even with a heavy sleeping bag, the wetness is going to raise the problem of hypothermia.

You might also consider some sort of drop camp, where an outfitter will haul your gear to a location, then pick you up after a time period of your choosing. That way you can have your shelter, water, fire, and food and still not have to worry about all the packing in and out each day.

tim
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Location: north idaho
Joined: 06/11/2004
Posts: 602
Elk hunting coyote style?

start backpacking, it is a great way to let you know what you can and can't do.
September in the mountains can bring you anything and everything, from snow to 70 degrees. Prepare for all.

One thing is that you can wear your clothes for a week, you can get by with 2 pair of socks for a week. you can get by with freeze dried for a week. That is how you have to think. You want to be light and weather resistant.

There are a couple of books out there that talk about backpack hunting. DAvid longs book is good. Cameron haines book isn't bad either. Mike eastmans books do have a good chapter on this style of hunting. It is fun and can be addictive. Also be reasonable on what you can carry and for how long.

tim

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Location: Puyallup, WA / Grand Rapids, MI
Joined: 10/24/2007
Posts: 96
Elk hunting coyote style?

I've thought about hunting out in a wilderness.
Living out of a backpack for a week or so wouldn't be a problem for me.
But what's stopped me is the difficulty of bringing an animal out again.
If I'm miles out into the mountains by myself (with a pack that's already about 50 pounds and a rifle) and I get something, how can I get the animal back?

tim
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Location: north idaho
Joined: 06/11/2004
Posts: 602
Elk hunting coyote style?

gboyd

sometimes you make alot of trips back and forth when you bag something. I figure my pack is a hunting pack and if it gets bloody it gets bloody.
Some people already have a person with horses set up to get your meat out.
I would definalty have this figured out way before you go hunting.

water shouldn't be much of a problem in the mountains. Bring a water filter.
However i will say i have been known to pack water in ahead of time if i am camping on nothing but ridege tops. Kind of like caches.

oh there will be times when the trip is miserable. that is just reality of hunting the mountains.

tim

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Location: SW Mtns. NM
Joined: 05/04/2008
Posts: 227
Elk hunting coyote style?

These guys know of which they speak. I have been backpacking,hunting,fishing the Sierra Nevada Mtns. since I was a kid. I'm a 53 yr old kid, still packing out my meat, altho I got smart this year and have a outfitter on call if I have trouble getting my bull elk out of thePecosWilderness,. I'm not going to chance loseing that meat. Take a H20filter and be prepared for worst even in so called warm seasons/areas. Most game can be boned and packed out in a trip or two, get your game out first and camp last , and each trip will be forever in your mind. Hank4elk

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Location: Greeley, CO
Joined: 07/19/2008
Posts: 635
Like a "Real" westerner you mean! LOL!

The caching of water is a great plan! I have a couple of areas I have hunted over the years that are 5-7 miles each way; in and out. Whenever I am scouting I try to cache water in some hiding place. I have lost a few to wildlife, but have used a few on other occasions!

I learned this trick from a friend who one time came upon a heat exhaused/dehydrated hunter and prolly saved his life. He ran across the guy on his way back to camp when he too was almost out of water his self. It was still a few miles back to camp, but only about a mile to where he stashed water TWO years before.

IMO it really does depend greatly on where you are planning to go though. There is a huge difference between 8K' and 12-13K"! Altitude sickness is a def reality! Especially when coming from sea level! I am [43] with a bum leg, and way over weight and still pack my stuff out. Allow ample time to pack-out. (i.e... don't down a monster bull 6 miles in on the last day of the hunt when you have to be back to work in the next day or two!) De-boning in the field, especially on elk is a must if you have a long hike in an inaccessible area. It will litterally save you hundreds of pounds and most likely several trips back in & out. Do not over exert yourself!

Don't overload yourself on the first trip either! An example of this one is; a couple of years back another one of my buddies (who did not listen to the rest of us!) tried to to load a front quarter of a big bull and the rack and cape along with the other items he already carried in. We had warned him of NOT overloading himself and he did it anyway "just because he could"! It was well in excess of 100#! When on the way back he was going down a pretty steep slope and strained his back! Almost killing his self by falling when he collapsed! Luckily the pack got hung up on rocks and stopped him from going over a bigger cliff/drop-off! Shame on You!

This was early afternoon and we did not find him until about 10pm in the pitch darkness when he was trying to crawl back to camp. We found him by firing the warning shots and he following up. We had to narrow his location down by doing this a couple of times and finally found him in an open draw. (ever since this trip 6-7 years ago we carry radios!) The rest of us ruined the last two days of our hunts trying to locate his downed carcass which we never did find! Brick Wall,)

Bags? Hmmm, a good high quality lighweight backpacking bag rated from +15 - 0 degrees should be "OK' during Oct, heed all the warnings other have mentioned about condensation and moisture! Spend the day drying and not hunting if it does get wet and you still have more days of the hunt to go, it just may save your life. Water, shelter are IMHO the most important keys to survival.

Best of luck at whatever your plans end up! Thumbs up

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Location: Teton Valley, ID
Joined: 08/01/2008
Posts: 106
Elk hunting coyote style?

What HeavyC said about not overweighting yourself is great advice. I porter off and on all summer long, regularly carrying loads in excess of 100 lbs. I never consider carrying a load that big during hunting season. Elk hang out in tough terrain and often not real close trails.

MSR's Mioxx water system is light, works with rock salt through a chemical reaction. Refill water every available chance. Powdered Gatorade will help in water emptying from the gut faster, helping you stay hydrated better. A water bladder will help you drink more!!!!!!!!!!

Like everyone has said, any weather is possible! A bivy sack is better than a bag cover. Black Diamond Equip. Makes a Winter Bivy that is light and packs the size of a Nalgene. Learn to make a sleeping platform out of skinny logs to get up off the ground. Get a down sleeping bag with a waterproof stuff sack. Down has a greater temperature comfort range than synthetics and Packs considerably smaller. Check out Mtn. Hardwares Phantom 0 bag.

If possible you want to get out here at least a week or better, 10 days before you plan to hunt to get acclimatized. Thumbs up

Chris

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