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Democrats in congress

What? The Democrat controlled Congress has a lower approval rating than President Bush? Say it isn't so.

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SoCoKHntr's picture
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What's even funnier is it looks like those evil, communist, marxist, orgy loving, tree hugging, sandal wearing, fools are going to win even more seats in both houses. Now that's downright knee slapping hilarious. Oh wait, it get's even funnier, what with a 'Muslim' President to boot.

What a hoot!!!

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SoCoKHntr wrote:
What's even funnier is it looks like those evil, communist, marxist, orgy loving, tree hugging, sandal wearing, fools are going to win even more seats in both houses. Now that's downright knee slapping hilarious. Oh wait, it get's even funnier, what with a 'Muslim' President to boot.

What a hoot!!!

I don't know about that SoCo, Talk around here is that Dems are fed up that Congress recessing before tackling the energy problem. Seems that the thinking is to not get into an issue that may force Obama to show what his plan may be, or lack there of, before the election. Southern Democrats are not as easy to jump on board the "Change" express as Northern and Western Democrats when there is nothing from Obama and the Democratically controlled Congress to show that they are in fact "different" than the "norm" in Washington.
I have heard nothing good about Pelosi in recent days when before she was walking on water.
Just what I have been hearing.

P.S. Obama is not Muslim. Oops! He is a Christian which is Ironic that Librals like him so much.

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SoCoKHntr wrote:
What's even funnier is it looks like those evil, communist, marxist, orgy loving, tree hugging, sandal wearing, fools are going to win even more seats in both houses. Now that's downright knee slapping hilarious. Oh wait, it get's even funnier, what with a 'Muslim' President to boot.

What a hoot!!!

Which is indeed a sad commentary on the American voter. It won't last, though. Once voters realize that the Democrats have nothing to offer besides armchair quarterbacking and invoking the Bush boogeyman, they'll come around.

Interesting article by Thomas Sowell on this regard:

http://townhall.com/columnists/ThomasSowell/2008/08/12/the_galbraith_effect

While on the subject of Sowell, I mentioned earlier that a vote for Obama was a vote against secret ballots in the workplace over union issues. He wrote about that one, too:

http://townhall.com/columnists/ThomasSowell/2008/08/13/whose_special_int...

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JTapia wrote:
[
P.S. Obama is not Muslim. Oops! He is a Christian which is Ironic that Librals like him so much.

Nope, this can't be true, I've heard Sean Hannity and Limbaugh say he was raised by Muslims and went to school in a Madras on the Afghan Pakistan border so it must be true. Yes

Democrats/liberals/free thinkers don't dislike Christians, rather they dislike religious zealots of any stripe christian/muslim/hari Krishna and so forth that believe it's their duty to convert others and enforce their beliefs on them.

I respect and admire any person regardless of a specific religion or lack therefore who displays a true spirituality and is a good positive being.

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I also respect and admire any person regardless of a specific religion or lack therefore who displays a true spirituality and is a good positive being.

I think what you're missing is the fact that Obama did not become a Christian until after the age of 30, when prompted by his wife. You have to remember that he admitted to looking up to people such as Malcolm X, who was a Muslim the last I knew. You should also remember that Reverend Wright's version of Christianity (where Obama was supposedly converted) is somewhat different than that of conventional Christian's. Louis Farrakhan and Father Phlegar also touted their twisted messages there.

The fact that Obama was raised by Muslims and went to school in a Madras on the Afghan Pakistan border does bring up questions of caution from many moderate folks. While I agree that most moderates (most people in the U.S. today that lean slight left or right) dislike religious zealots, they also dislike the ultra-liberal far left pro abortion/environmentalist/PETA/Peace-Nik/anti-gun/anti-hunting fanatics.

You know, I certainly thought that the far right group praying for rain during the Democratic convention during Barack Hussein Obama's acceptance speech was a bit wacky. However, I thought it was appalling when folks at MoveOn and The Huff were hoping that right wing folks and moderates would get brain tumors, cancer or other illnesses and die. Rain is quite a bit different than wishing death upon others. It just shows how looney the far left really is. The posts were supposed to be pulled, but was it only, because an election is near?

While I certainly hope the liberal's lose elections, I do not wish ill will upon any of them.

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Quote:
went to school in a Madras on the Afghan Pakistan border

I'd be interested in seeing a link to a reputable source.

Check out what this senator will say to keep his job, remember he has an R before his name.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZScS9UpgcII

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Democrats in congress

August 14, 2008
G.O.P. in House at Risk in Northeast
By RAYMOND HERNANDEZ
WASHINGTON — Across the increasingly Democratic Northeast, Republicans are in danger of losing half a dozen or more Congressional seats in November, as even districts once considered safe have become vulnerable to well-financed Democrats, according to political analysts and members of both parties.

In Connecticut, Representative Christopher Shays, a 10-term incumbent who barely won re-election two years ago, is facing what both parties and independent analysts agree is a tough battle.

On Staten Island, the retirement of Vito J. Fossella, who was arrested in Virginia on drunken-driving charges and later admitted to fathering a child in an extramarital affair, has combined with discord among local Republicans to give Democrats their best chance of winning the district in decades.

And in New Jersey, the retirement of two Republican incumbents, Michael Ferguson and Jim Saxton, opened seats in swing districts where Democratic candidates are far ahead of their Republican rivals in fund-raising.

The Republican Party’s challenges in the nine-state Northeast region are a reflection of what the party faces across the country as it is being forced to defend dozens of Congressional seats that are now considered competitive at a time when the party has limited financial resources, political analysts said.

All told, there are roughly a dozen competitive Congressional races in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New Hampshire, nearly all of them in districts now held by Republicans, according to analysts and strategists in both parties.

Meanwhile, all but 2 of the 11 Congressional Democrats who won office in 2006 in the Northeast appear headed into the general election campaign in a strong position, the analysts said.

This is a blow to Republicans because members of Congress are considered most vulnerable after their first term and Republicans had been expected to vigorously challenge freshmen lawmakers in the Northeast.

As a result, Democrats are in a strong position to expand their dominance in the Northeast region, where they already hold 60 of the 81 Congressional seats and hope to improve their numbers even further by aggressively contesting Republicans for eight more seats.

In the midterm elections of 2006, Democrats picked up 11 seats in the region.

“Republicans are playing defense in the Northeast,” said Representative Peter T. King, a Republican from Long Island who is not facing a serious challenge this year. “There could be a dramatic political realignment in the Northeast if Republicans don’t head it off right now.”

Most of the Republican-held seats in the region that are being contested are in play as a result of retirements by longtime incumbents who managed to win re-election repeatedly despite large numbers of Democrats in their districts. At the same time, there are up to three Republican incumbents who face what Democratic and Republican strategists agree are difficult re-election campaigns.

Democrats are also being helped by a growing concern among voters about the state of the economy and continuing doubts about the war in Iraq, strategists say. Democrats are also doing very well in their fund-raising efforts. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has $54.6 million on hand, compared with $8.4 million raised by the National Republican Congressional Committee.

Given the Republican Party’s limited financial resources and the number of Republican incumbents with fights on their hands elsewhere in the country, it is unclear how aggressively party officials will be able to defend its open seats in Northeast, though the party says it will mount an all-out effort.

At this point in the campaign, it is expected that there will be competitive races in at least 60 Congressional districts nationwide, said David N. Wasserman, the House analyst for The Cook Political Report, a nonpartisan newsletter. Mr. Wasserman said most of those districts are held by Republicans.

That reflects the degree to which the party remains on the defensive after having lost its majority in 2006, when Republican candidates struggled against the weight of President Bush’s unpopularity, a stream of bad news from Iraq and various Congressional scandals.

Mr. Wasserman said the challenge that Republicans face nationally is especially large in the Northeast because that is where polls show President Bush to be the most unpopular.

He said a stark sign of how hard the situation is for Republicans was on Staten Island, where several prominent Republicans declined to run for the seat vacated by Mr. Fossella, which had long been considered a virtual lock for Republicans.

“The exclamation point on this year’s Congressional elections is that Republicans don’t have a competitive candidate on Staten Island,” Mr. Wasserman said. “The Staten Island Republican Party has been renowned for producing powerful politicians for years — for decades.”

But Republicans are not solely playing defense in the Northeast. They are taking aim at a handful of Democrat-held districts that independent analysts and even Democrats said Republicans have a shot of winning.

Among this group of vulnerable Democrats are two first-term members, Representative Christopher P. Carney of Pennsylvania and Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire. Republicans are also mounting a challenge against Representative Paul E. Kanjorski in Pennsylvania.

Republican hopes of toppling two Democratic freshmen in New York, Kirsten Gillibrand and Michael Arcuri, are less likely, political analysts said.

In the meantime, the unexpected retirements of five Republican congressmen, two from New Jersey and three from New York, have created prime opportunities for Democrats. The benefits of incumbency, including high visibility and access to federal money for their districts, had long protected these lawmakers in an increasingly Democratic region.

Perhaps no better example is Representative James T. Walsh, a 10-term Republican from New York who announced in January that he would retire when his term expired. Mr. Walsh has a key role over appropriations and is a fixture in his Syracuse-area district, making him a formidable candidate to challenge.

But with Mr. Walsh out of the way, Democrats appear to be in a strong position to pick up his seat, in part because of the fund-raising advantage held by Dan Maffei, the Democratic candidate. Mr. Maffei, who lost to Mr. Walsh by about 3,400 votes in 2006, has nearly $1 million in his campaign account, compared with nearly $110,000 raised by his Republican opponent, Dale Sweetland, a former county legislator.

In another sign of trouble for Republicans, there are two Congressional districts in which the party’s incumbents stand only an even chance of holding on their seats, according to analysts monitoring the races.

One is Connecticut’s Fourth Congressional District, where Mr. Shays, the Republican incumbent, has proved to be a nimble politician who has frustrated repeated attempts to defeat him.

Mr. Shays, the only House Republican in Connecticut to survive the 2006 elections, has survived largely by blurring any distinction between himself and Democrats in a district that has voted solidly Democratic in the last two presidential elections.

Now, he is being challenged by Jim Himes, a former Goldman Sachs executive. Mr. Himes has $1.4 million on hand, compared with $1.7 million for Mr. Shays, according to the latest campaign finance disclosure reports.

The other embattled Republican incumbent is Representative John R. Kuhl Jr. of New York’s 29th District, in the state’s Southern Tier. His Democratic opponent is Eric Massa, a former Navy officer and a former staff member of the House Armed Services Committee, whom Mr. Kuhl defeated two years ago with 52 percent of the vote. In a measure of the tightness of the race, Mr. Massa has $652,000 in his coffers, compared with nearly $619,000 for Mr. Kuhl.

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Follow the Democrat money, and it leads to interesting places. Up here in Alaska, a lot of Democrat cash is coming from sources in the Lower 48 with no interest in what's good for Alaska -- they just want to buy a majority in Congress to push their agenda. Alaskans are an independent bunch of people with strong memories of being abused as some sort of colony by interests in the Lower 48 -- they're not too keen on candidates taking cash from sources friendly to people who would impose restrictions on the state's right to develop.

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I've been following the Alaska race when it comes up on the radar screen. Sounds like a lot of repubs have been holding back on money until after the primaries, when are they? Pols don't look good.

Did you follow the you tube link to your very own Benedict Arnold? He certainly doesn't lean left, only trying to save his skin. He and Lieberman, birds of a feather from different parties.

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Whelland wrote:
You know, I certainly thought that the far right group praying for rain during the Democratic convention during Barack Hussein Obama's acceptance speech was a bit wacky. However, I thought it was appalling when folks at MoveOn and The Huff were hoping that right wing folks and moderates would get brain tumors, cancer or other illnesses and die. Rain is quite a bit different than wishing death upon others. It just shows how looney the far left really is. The posts were supposed to be pulled, but was it only, because an election is near?

While I certainly hope the liberal's lose elections, I do not wish ill will upon any of them.

Serious question, I have never heard of anyone from the Moveon or the Huff who wished or hoped for brain tumors or other illnesses on anyone. Please provide a link to these reports as I would like to read about them. If they are indeed true anyone who hoped for a brain tumor on someone is just as wacky as focus on the family or the rev. Phelps fellow.

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