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CWD i.e. TSE end of year update 2005

CWD i.e. TSE end of year update 2005

http://www.biggamehunt.net/node/15944

TSS

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Posts: 230
16 NEW CASES CWD FOUND IN ILLINOIS WITH NEW CASES IN NORTH

Subject: ILLINOIS FINDS 16 MORE CASES OF CWD WITH New cases found in Northern Illinois
Date: January 10, 2006 at 11:57 am PST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 9, 2006

DEER SEASON SAMPLING FINDS ADDITIONAL EVIDENCE OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE
New cases found in Northern Illinois

SPRINGFIELD, IL. – Sixteen additional cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) have been detected in northern Illinois through sampling of hunter-harvested deer during the state’s 2005-06 deer seasons. The new cases include two deer taken by hunters in Ogle County, the first time CWD has been detected there.

“The Department of Natural Resources continues intensive sampling for CWD as part of our effort to slow the spread of the disease in our wild deer herd,” said Paul Shelton, manager of the IDNR Forest Wildlife Program. “We appreciate the support of hunters who continue to voluntarily allow us to take tissue samples from their deer to test for the disease. The sampling, testing and surveillance is extremely important as we deal with CWD.”

Chronic wasting disease was first discovered in Illinois in November 2002 and to date Illinois has detected 112 positive cases.

The disease had been confined in northern Illinois in Boone, Winnebago, McHenry and northern DeKalb until the two new cases were detected in nearby Ogle County this winter.

“We were somewhat surprised to find these two cases in Ogle County because no cases had been detected there previously despite very intensive sampling,” Shelton said. “We’ve sampled nearly 2,000 deer in Ogle County since 2003 and these are the only two cases we have found there to date. We are still awaiting the results of approximately 350 other samples from Ogle County taken this fall.”

Illinois biologists have collected samples from more than 2,500 deer in seven northern Illinois counties so far during the 2005-06 firearm and archery deer seasons and from suspect animals reported to the IDNR.

Hunters in Boone, Winnebago and McHenry counties a portion of DeKalb County north of the East-West Tollway will participate in a CWD Deer Season Jan. 13-15 to help control deer densities and the spread of chronic wasting disease. Hunters with unfilled 2005 firearm, muzzleloader or archery deer permits valid for one of the open counties may use those to hunt. Hunters using unfilled permits from the 2005 firearm, muzzleloader or archery season may take deer appropriate for that permit (antlerless-only or either-sex). Special CWD season permits were also issued previously. Check stations will be manned in the four counties and successful hunters who submit samples for CWD testing will be provided with an additional permit valid for the remainder of the season.

Confirmed CWD cases by county:
Boone-53
Winnebago-42
McHenry-9
Dekalb-6
Ogle-2

Check station locations for the CWD Deer Season:

Boone County - Boone County Fairgrounds, Rt. 76 and Business Rt. 20, Belvidere.
DeKalb County - Potawatomi Woods Forest Preserve, 32199 Kirkland Rd.(one-quarter mile north of Rt. 72), Kirkland.
McHenry County - Sportsman’s Choice, intersection of Routes 14 and 47, Woodstock.
Winnebago County - Rock Cut State Park, 6425 Hart Rd. (one mile east of Perryville Rd. on Hart Rd.), Loves Park.

While not thought to be contagious to humans or livestock, CWD is known to spread from animal to animal among deer and elk. The disease affects the brain of the infected animal, causing it to become emaciated, display abnormal behavior, lose coordination and eventually die.

Illinois expanded its chronic wasting disease surveillance effort in 2002 following the discovery of CWD in neighboring Wisconsin. For updated information about CWD, check the IDNR web site at: http://dnr.state.il.us/cwd. Hunters who participated in the CWD sampling can check the status of their deer at this site. Hunters who provided samples from deer that test positive are notified by the IDNR.

###

http://dnr.state.il.us/pubaffairs/2006/Jan/cwd.htm

http://dnr.state.il.us/cwd/map.pdf

TSS

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Joined: 01/01/2006
Posts: 230
CWD UPDATE April 2009

SUBMITTED: December 8, 2008 RESUBMITTED: January 12,2009 RESUBMITTED: February 9, 2009 RESUBMITTED: March 9,2009

SUBMITTED: December 8, 2008 RESUBMITTED: January 12,2009 RESUBMITTED: February 9, 2009 RESUBMITTED: March 9,2009

APPROVED

MICHIGAN NATURAL RESOURCES COMMISSION ASSISTANT TO THE COMMISSION

MEMORANDUM TO THE NATURAL RESOURCES COMMISSION

SUBJECT: Taxidermy Regulations Wildlife Conservation Order Amendment No.1 of 2009

Authority:

The Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451, as amended, authorizes the Director and the Commission to issue orders to manage wild animals in this state.

Discussion and Background:

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) poses a serious threat to the health of Michigan's deer, moose, and elk populations, both free-ranging and privately-owned, and to their long-term management. In response to this threat, the Department adopted the Michigan Surveillance and Response Plan for Chronic Wasting Disease of Free-Ranging and Privately-Owned Cervids (CWD Plan) on August 26, 2002. Based on available knowledge in 2002, the CWD Plan requires various surveillance and control measures to be implemented when CWD is documented within the state.

On August 25, 2008, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed CWD in a deer from a privately-owned facility in Kent County. The confirmation from Ames, Iowa, triggered the implementation of the control measures required in the CWD Plan.

It is now known that the carcasses of CWD-infected deer can serve as a source of infection. Remains from infected carcasses are known to contaminate sites for many years. For this reason, import bans exist for whole carcasses that originate from states with known CWD occurrences. Violations of these restrictions do occur.

Those areas where infected carcasses or carcass parts may be found in quantity, such as taxidermy facilities, may act as foci where infection of live cervids may occur. Taxidermy operations were not noted in the CWD Plan, as they had not yet been identified as a potential source of infection.

NATURAL RESOURCES COMMISSION

Keith J. Charters, Chair. Mary Brown. Hurley J. Coleman, Jr.• John Madigan. J R. Richardson. Frank Wheatlake STEVENS T. MASON BUILDING. P.O. BOX 30028 • LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909-7528 http://www.michigan.gov/dnr. (517) 373-2329 Great Lakes. Great Times. Great Outdoors!

Taxidermy Regulations Wildlife Conservation Order Amendment No.1 of 2009 Page 2 March 9, 2009

A case in the state of New York had strong evidence that a CWD-positive animal living in an enclosure was linked to a taxidermy operation. Since there are no biosecurity protocols that can assure the destruction of the CWD agent, it is prudent to take steps to reduce the likelihood of live cervids interacting with potentially infected byproducts of taxidermy operations.

This amendment proposes that taxidermy operations be conducted in a manner that byproducts and waste generated by the facility not be allowed to come into contact with live animals. There are also updates to monitoring and reporting requirements to assure compliance to all conditions of the permit.

Recommendation:

This order was submitted for information on January 8, February 5, and March 5, 2009, at the Natural Resources Commission Meetings. This item appeared on the Department's December, 2008, and January, and February 2009 calendars and may be eligible for approval on April 2, 2009.

I have analyzed and discussed these recommendations with staff and concur as to matters over which the Natural Resources Commission has authority.

Rebecca A. Humphries Director

Russ Mason, Ph.D., Chief

Wildlife Division Law Enforcement Division Resource Management Deputy

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION ORDER

Amendment No.1 of 2009

By authority conferred on the Natural Resources Commission and the Director of the Department of Natural Resources by sections 40107 and 40113a of 1994 PA 451, MCL 324.41107 and 324.40113a, it is ordered that effective April 3, 2009, the following section(s) of the WiId Iife Conservation Order shall read as follows:

5.31 Taxidermy permit, rules.

Sec. 5.31. (1) A taxidermy permit shall be valid for 3 years or through the third June 30 after issue, whichever comes first.

(2) A person issued a taxidermy permit shall keep a record, in addition to the specimen tag, of all animals and animal parts which are received or disposed. All records and plumage and skins in permittee's possession shall be available for inspection by the director, a designee of the director, or conservation officer. Records, other than the specimen tag, shall be retained on the premises for six years and include the following:

(a) Name of specimen.

(b) Name and address of the person from whom received.

(c) Name and address of the person owning the specimen.

(d) County, state, province, and country where taken.

(e) Tag or seal number of game or protected animal.

(f) Date animal and animal parts received and date disposed. ( g) Name to whom product is delivered.

(3) A person issued a taxidermy permit shall only possess game, protected animals, or animal parts for the purpose of taxidermy at the location described in their taxidermy permit.

(4) For deer, elk, or moose, a person acting under the authority of a taxidermy permit shall:

(a) lf live cervids are kept on the premises of the taxidermy business:

i. Not allow any live animal to come into contact with any taxidermy materials and any waste generated from taxidermy, through the use of exclusionary structures such as gates and doors.

ii. Employ personal protective clothing, such as but not limited to coveralls, boots and gloves, by visitors and workers in the area.

iii. Employ trash receptacles within the work site for disposable protective clothing.

iv. Employ cleaning facilities to ensure that materials taken from work site, including non-disposable personal protective equipment, are free of dirt, debris, and waste materials.

v. Dispose of all animal waste products in a manner that ensures disposal to a type ll landfill.

vi. Not provide animal parts from deer, elk, or moose for use as bait for the purpose of attracting animals for hunting, trapping, or other recreational pursuits.

vii. Not provide animal parts from deer, elk, or moose for use as a food for other animals.

(b) If no live cervids are kept on the premises of the taxidermy business:

i. Dispose of all animal waste products in a manner that ensures disposal to a type ll landfill.

ii. Not provide animal parts from deer, elk, or moose for use as bait for the purpose of attracting animals for hunting, trapping, or other recreational pursuits.

iii. Not provide animal parts from deer, elk, or moose for use as food for other animals.

5.110 Special permits; fees; disposition.

Sec. 5.110. The following fees are established for permits issued by the director:

(I) Effective June 1,2009, a fee of $100.00 shall be collected for each taxidermy permit issued. Taxidermy specimen identification tags shall be $10 per fifty.

(2) A fee equivalent to the fee charged for a resident antler less deer hunting license shall be collected for each managed deer hunting permit and each deer management assistance permit purchased by a permittee.

(3) All moneys received from the sale of permits and licenses as provided in this section shall be turned over to the state treasurer and credited to the game and fish protection fund.

(4) No fee shall be collected for any of the following permits:

(a) Highway killed deer/bear permit.

(b) Deer damage shooting permit.

(c) Damage and nuisance animal control permit, including disease control and disease control replacement permits.

(d) Rehabilitation permit.

(e) Permit to take game with a crossbow.

Issued this 2nd day of April, 2009.

Approved as to matters over which the Natural Resources Commission has authority.

Keith J. Charters, Chairman Natural Resources Commission

Approved as to matters over which the Director has authority.

Rebecca A. Humphries Director

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/01-09_Taxidermy_INFO_12.8.08_26007...

FINAL

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/01-09_Taxidermy_Final_3.10.09_2712...

Wednesday, January 07, 2009

CWD to tighten taxidermy rules Hunters need to understand regulations

The movement of high-risk carcass parts (brain, spinal cord, lymph tissues) is a potential avenue through which CWD could be spread from infected areas. Investigations in New York indicate that the infection could have been spread by a taxidermist who accepted specimens from CWD-positive states, allowed rehabilitated fawns access to the taxidermy workshop and spread potentially infectious curing salt waste as a fence line weed killer on his deer farm.

http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/cwp/view.asp?a=458&q=168948

http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/lib/pgc/taxidermists_cwd.pdf

http://wolftracksproductions.yuku.com/topic/874/t/Wyoming-deer-killed-by...

for anyone interested in full text ;

Thursday, March 26, 2009

HB 4214 - Texas: Relating to the business of taxidermy; providing penalties AND HELP PREVENT CWD

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/03/hb-4214-texas-relati...

see also MAY 2009 CDC WARNING CWD, PRIONS, HUMANS ;

I find this study most important.

some of us have been saying this for years, myself, i made a submission to the BSE Inquiry in England in 1998. At least they listened.

But i thought some of you would be interested in this.

I don't care really what anybody eats, and or, if you want to pour a gallon of urine on yourself, if it makes you feel good, to go for a hunt. whatever turns you on.

BUT, when you have the CDC finally come out with a warning like this after so many years of floundering, better late than never i suppose, but how many were exposed needlessly???

----- Original Message -----
From: "TERRY SINGELTARY"
To:
Sent: Thursday, March 19, 2009 8:47 PM
Subject: [CJD-L] Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Antler Velvet (Nutritional Supplements and CJD)

10.3201/eid1505.081458 Suggested citation for this article: Angers RC, Seward TS, Napier D, Green M, Hoover E, Spraker T, et al. Chronic wasting disease prions in elk antler velvet. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 May; [Epub ahead of print]

Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Antler Velvet

Rachel C. Angers,1 Tanya S. Seward, Dana Napier, Michael Green, Edward Hoover, Terry Spraker, Katherine O'Rourke, Aru Balachandran, and Glenn C. Telling Author affiliations: University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky, USA (R.C. Angers, T.S. Seward, D. Napier, M. Green, G.C. Telling); Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (E. Hoover, T. Spraker); US Department of Agriculture, Pullman, Washington, USA (K. O'Rourke); and Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (A. Balachandran) 1Current affiliation: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a contagious, fatal prion disease of deer and elk that continues to emerge in new locations. To explore the means by which prions are transmitted with high efficiency among cervids, we examined prion infectivity in the apical skin layer covering the growing antler (antler velvet) by using CWD-susceptible transgenic mice and protein misfolding cyclic amplification. Our finding of prions in antler velvet of CWD-affected elk suggests that this tissue may play a role in disease transmission among cervids. Humans who consume antler velvet as a nutritional supplement are at risk for exposure to prions. The fact that CWD prion incubation times in transgenic mice expressing elk prion protein are consistently more rapid raises the possibility that residue 226, the sole primary structural difference between deer and elk prion protein, may be a major determinant of CWD pathogenesis.

snip...

Discussion

Acknowledgments We thank Dongyue Zhuang for excellent technical assistance. This work was supported by grants 2RO1NS040334-04 from the National Institute

http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/15/5/pdfs/08-1458.pdf

snip...

1998 MY SUBMISSION TO THE BSE INQUIRY ENGLAND

Sender: "Patricia Cantos"
To: "Terry S Singeltary Sr. (E-mail)"
Subject: Your submission to the Inquiry
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 1998 10:10:05 +0100

3 July 1998 Mr Terry S Singeltary Sr. E-Mail: Flounder at wt.net Ref: E2979

Dear Mr Singeltary,

Thank you for your E-mail message of the 30th of June 1998 providing the Inquiry with your further comments. Thank you for offering to provide the Inquiry with any test results on the nutritional supplements your mother was taking before she died.

As requested I am sending you our general Information Pack and a copy of the Chairman's letter. Please contact me if your system cannot read the attachments.

Regarding your question, the Inquiry is looking into many aspects of the scientific evidence on BSE and nvCJD. I would refer you to the transcripts of evidence we have already heard which are found on our internet site at http://www.bse.org.uk. Could you please provide the Inquiry with a copy of the press article you refer to in your e-mail? If not an approximate date for the article so that we can locate it? In the meantime, thank you for you comments. Please do not hesitate to contact me on 0171 261 8332 should you have any queries.

Yours sincerely Patricia Cantos Families Team Leader Attachments TSS

==============

-------- Original Message --------

Subject: re: METABOLIFE AND TSEs GAO-03-494 ''URGENT DATA''
Date: Thu, 01 May 2003 16:04:35 -0400
From: "Marcia G Crosse"
To: CC: "Charles W Davenport" , "Carolyn Feis Korman" , "Martin Gahart"

Mr. Singletary,

We were informed by representatives of Metabolife, Inc. that Metabolife 356 was reformulated to remove bovine complex as an ingredient in the product, approximately September 2001. We did not independently verify the contents of the product.

Sincerely, Marcia Crosse Acting Director Health CarePublic Health and Science Issues U.S. General Accounting Office 441 G Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20548

===================

-------- Original Message -------- Subject: Re: METABOLIFE AND TSEs GAO-03-494 ''URGENT DATA'' Date: Thu, 01 May 2003 15:48:52 -0500 From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." To: Marcia G Crosse CC: Charles W Davenport , Carolyn Feis Korman , Martin Gahart References:

THANK YOU!

MIRACLES DO HAPPEN! ;-)

now all we need to do is;

snip......

one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind ;-)

however;

''We did not independently verify the contents of the product''

???

TSS

####### http://mailhost.rz.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ########

see history of mad cow in a pill ;

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Antler Velvet (Nutritional Supplements and CJD)

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/03/chronic-wasting-dise...

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Detection of CWD Prions in Urine and Saliva of Deer by Transgenic Mouse Bioassay

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/03/detection-of-cwd-pri...

AND THEY ARE NOT RECALLING ALL THIS CWD POSITIVE MEAT FOR THE WELL BEING OF THE DEAD ELK. ...TSS

RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: FOODS CLASS II

___________________________________

PRODUCT

a) Elk Meat, Elk Tenderloin, Frozen in plastic vacuum packaging. Each package is approximately 2 lbs., and each case is approximately 16 lbs.; Item number 755125, Recall # F-129-9;

b) Elk Meat, Elk Trim, Frozen; Item number 755155, Recall # F-130-9;

c) Elk Meat, French Rack, Chilled. Item number 755132, Recall # F-131-9;

d) Elk Meat, Nude Denver Leg. Item number 755122, Recall # F-132-9;

e) Elk Meat, New York Strip Steak, Chilled. Item number 755128, Recall # F-133-9;

f) Elk Meat, Flank Steak Frozen. Item number 755131, Recall # F-134-9;

CODE

Elk Meats with production dates of December 29, 30, and 31

RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER

Recalling Firm: Sierra Meats, Reno, NV, by telephone on January 29, 2009 and press release on February 9, 2009.

Manufacturer: Noah's Ark Holding, LLC, Dawson, MN. Firm initiated recall is ongoing.

REASON

Elk products contain meat derived from an elk confirmed to have Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE

Unknown

DISTRIBUTION

NV, CA, TX, CO, NY, UT, FL, OK

___________________________________

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ENFORCE/2009/ENF01099.html

Monday, February 09, 2009

Exotic Meats USA Announces Urgent Statewide Recall of Elk Tenderloin Because It May Contain Meat Derived From An Elk Confirmed To Have CWD

snip...

Cross-sequence transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease creates a new prion strain

Date: August 25, 2007 at 12:42 pm PST

our results raise the possibility that CJD cases classified as VV1 may include cases caused by iatrogenic transmission of sCJD-MM1 prions or food-borne infection by type 1 prions from animals, e.g., chronic wasting disease prions in cervid. In fact, two CJD-VV1 patients who hunted deer or consumed venison have been reported (40, 41). The results of the present study emphasize the need for traceback studies and careful re-examination of the biochemical properties of sCJD-VV1 prions.

http://www.jbc.org/

snip...

Clearly, it is premature to draw firm conclusions about CWD passing naturally into humans, cattle and sheep, but the present results suggest that CWD transmissions to humans would be as limited by PrP incompatibility as transmissions of BSE or sheep scrapie to humans. Although there is no evidence that sheep scrapie has affected humans, it is likely that BSE has caused variant CJD in 74 people (definite and probable variant CJD cases to date according to the UK CJD Surveillance Unit). Given the presumably large number of people exposed to BSE infectivity, the susceptibility of humans may still be very low compared with cattle, which would be consistent with the relatively inefficient conversion of human PrP-sen by PrPBSE. Nonetheless, since humans have apparently been infected by BSE, it would seem prudent to take reasonable measures to limit exposure of humans (as well as sheep and cattle) to CWD infectivity as has been recommended for other animal TSEs.

snip...

http://www.emboj.org/current.shtml

snip

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/03-1082.htm

From: TSS (216-119-163-189.ipset45.wt.net) Subject: CWD aka MAD DEER/ELK TO HUMANS ??? Date: September 30, 2002 at 7:06 am PST

From: "Belay, Ermias" To: Cc: "Race, Richard (NIH)" ; ; "Belay, Ermias" Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 9:22 AM Subject: RE: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Dear Sir/Madam, In the Archives of Neurology you quoted (the abstract of which was attached to your email), we did not say CWD in humans will present like variant CJD.

That assumption would be wrong. I encourage you to read the whole article and call me if you have questions or need more clarification (phone: 404-639-3091). Also, we do not claim that "no-one has ever been infected with prion disease from eating venison." Our conclusion stating that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans in the article you quoted or in any other forum is limited to the patients we investigated.

Ermias Belay, M.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

-----Original Message----- From: Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2002 10:15 AM To: [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask] Subject: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Sunday, November 10, 2002 6:26 PM ......snip........end..............TSS

snip...

full text ;

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/02/exotic-meats-usa-ann...

Wednesday, March 18, 2009
Noah's Ark Holding, LLC, Dawson, MN RECALL Elk products contain meat derived from an elk confirmed to have CWD NV, CA, TX, CO, NY, UT, FL, OK
RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: FOODS CLASS II

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2009/03/noahs-ark-holding-ll...

============================================================

Saturday, January 24, 2009

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy h-BSE ATYPICAL USA 2008 Annual Report Research Project: Study of Atypical Bse

Location: Virus and Prion Diseases of Livestock

2008 Annual Report

http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2009/01/bovine-spongiform-encephalopath...

Thursday, December 04, 2008 2:37 PM

"we have found that H-BSE can infect humans."

personal communication with Professor Kong. ...TSS

see full text ;

http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2009/02/atypical-bse-north-america-upda...

PRODUCT IN COMMERCE ;

http://www.google.com/search?um=1&ned=us&hl=en&q=antler+velvet+&btnmeta%...

Friday, November 30, 2007

CJD QUESTIONNAIRE USA CWRU AND CJD FOUNDATION

snip...

*** NOTE ***

please include venison/sheep/lamb and the bovine to any of the above questions.

example=brain tanning deer/elk hide or any other topics that pertain to transmission of TSEs

_________________________________________________

example=antler velvet nutritional supplements

_________________________________________________

_any_ nutritional supplements??? name/ingredients

_________________________________________________

example=elk/deer brains ie/scrambled, sandwich or otherwise

_________________________________________________

snip...

http://cjdquestionnaire.blogspot.com/

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

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