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CWD FOUND IN NEW HUNT AREA NEAR UCROSS WYOMING

Wyoming Outdoors: CWD infected mule deer shot east of Sheridan, Wyo.
By BOB KRUM
Wyoming Outdoors

A mule deer buck that was harvested Oct. 1 near Ucross, Wyo., has tested positive for chronic wasting disease.

Warren Mischke, a Sheridan information officer for the agency, reported that the lymph nodes from the deer were collected by Wyoming Game and Fish personnel and sent to the Game and Fish Laboratory to be analyzed. The tissue tested positive for CWD.

Although CWD has occurred in southeastern Wyoming for several years and has slowly been advancing into other areas of the state, this is the first time it has been found in the Sheridan area. So far, no cases of CWD have been found in Montana.

In case you are not familiar with chronic wasting disease, it is a degenerative brain disease that strikes deer, elk, and moose. It is similar to a disease that afflicts cattle, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, commonly called mad cow disease.

Wyoming Game and Fish personnel are continuing to sample deer harvested in the area.

"Although we have tested many animals from Hunt Area 23, we will collect samples from more deer to learn additional information about the distribution of CWD in and around this new area," said Lynn Jahnke, Sheridan wildlife management supervisor. "With hunting seasons still open, department officials hope to get more hunter-harvested samples from the area."

In deer Hunt Area 23, limited quota seasons for type 6 and 7 licenses extend to Dec. 16.

Deer Hunt Area 23 will be added to the Game and Fish Department's list of areas known to have CWD, according to Mischke's news release. Consequently, the Game and Fish recommends that Hunt Area 23 deer hunters transport only the following items: cut and wrapped meat, boned meat, animal quarters or other pieces with no portion of the spinal column or head attached, hides without the head, cleaned skull plates (no meat or nervous tissue attached), and antlers with no meat or other tissue attached. The head, spine and other nervous tissue - sites where the abnormal protein or prion causing the disease is found - should be left at the site of the kill or disposed of in an approved landfill.

The news release stated that there are no proven studies showing that CWD is a human health risk. The World Health Organization concluded, "There is currently no evidence that CWD in cervidae (deer, elk, moose) is transmitted to humans."

"The lack of evidence of a link between CWD transmission and unusual cases of CJD, (Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a human prion disease) despite several epidemiological investigations, suggest that the risk, if any, of transmission of CWD to humans is low," said Dr. Ermias Belay of the Center for Disease Control.

To dine or not

To be on the safe side, however, both WHO and CDC advise that any parts or products from any animal that looks sick or tests positive for CWD or other TSEs should not be eaten.

The Wyoming Game and Fish will keep the public informed of any other occurrences of CWD in the area.

If you have questions regarding CWD, contact Mischke at the Sheridan regional office of the Wyoming Game and Fish. The telephone number is 307-672-7418 extension 235 and the e-mail address is warren.Mischke @wgf.state.wy.us.

Bob Krumm, of Sheridan, is the Wyoming outdoor correspondent for The Billings Gazette. Contact him at rkrumm@fiberpipe.net.

Published on Thursday, October 18, 2007.

http://www.billingsgazette.net/articles/2007/10/18/features/outdoors/55-...

CWD FOUND IN NEW HUNT AREA NEAR UCROSS

10/12/2007

SHERIDAN - A mule deer buck harvested from deer hunt area 23, east of Sheridan near Ucross, tested positive for chronic wasting disease, a brain disease known to affect some moose deer and elk.

“Although CWD has been found in southeastern Wyoming for a number of years, this is the first time we have found CWD in hunt area 23 in northeast Wyoming,” says Warren Mischke, Wyoming Game & Fish Department’s Sheridan Region information specialist.

Department personnel collected the lymph nodes from the hunter-harvested mule deer on Oct. 1. Personnel in the Wyoming Game and Fish Department Laboratory then analyzed the sample and discovered positive result on Oct. 10.

“Although we have tested many animals from hunt area 23, we will collect samples from more deer to learn additional information about the distribution of CWD in and around this new area,” says Lynn Jahnke, Sheridan wildlife management supervisor. “With hunting seasons still open, department officials hope to get more hunter-harvested samples from the area. In deer hunt area 23 limited quota types 6 and 7 licenses will continue through Dec. 16.”

Deer hunt area 23 will be added to the department’s list of areas known to have CWD. Consequently, the Game and Fish recommends that deer hunt area 23 hunters transport only the following items: cut and wrapped meat, boned meat, animal quarters or other pieces with no portion of the spinal column or head attached, hides without the head, cleaned skull plates (no meat or nervous system tissue attached), antlers with no meat or other tissue attached. The head, spine and other nervous tissue - areas where the abnormal protein or prion causing the disease is found in infected animals - should be left at the site of the kill or disposed of in an approved landfill.

There is still no evidence that CWD is a human health risk. After a review of available scientific data, the World Health Organization in December 1999 stated, “There is currently no evidence that CWD in cervidae (deer and elk) is transmitted to humans.” In 2004, Dr. Ermias Belay of the Center for Disease Control said, “The lack of evidence of a link between CWD transmission and unusual cases of CJD, [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a human prion disease] despite several epidemiologic investigations, suggest that the risk, if any, of transmission of CWD to humans is low.” Nonetheless to avoid any risk, both organizations say parts or products from any animal that looks sick or tests positive for CWD or other TSEs should not be eaten.

As tests are completed the Game and Fish will keep the public informed of any other cases of CWD found in new hunt areas.

(contact: Warren Mischke or Lynn Jahnke(307) 672-7418)
-WGFD-

http://gf.state.wy.us/services/news/pressreleases/07/10/12/071012_1.asp

From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Subject: CWD UPDATE 88 AUGUST 31, 2007

http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0709&L=sanet-mg&T=0&P=450

Date: Wed, 29 Aug 2007 21:13:08 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Subject: CWD NEW MEXICO RECORDS IT'S 19 CASE (near Texas border again)

http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0708&L=sanet-mg&T=0&P=26079

Monitoring the Potential Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease to Humans
Using a Hunter Registry Database in Wyoming (405 lines)
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2007 21:23:42 -0500

http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0708&L=sanet-mg&T=0&F=&S=...

J Biol Chem. 2007 Aug 20; : 17709374

Cross-sequence transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease creates a
new prion strain.

####################################

our results raise the possibility that CJD cases
classified as VV1 may include cases caused by
iatrogenic transmission of sCJD-MM1 prions or
food-borne infection by type 1 prions from animals,
e.g., chronic wasting disease prions in cervid. In fact,
two CJD-VV1 patients who hunted deer or
consumed venison have been reported (40, 41). The
results of the present study emphasize the need for
traceback studies and careful re-examination of the
biochemical properties of sCJD-VV1 prions.

###################################

FULL TEXT ;

http://www.jbc.org/

http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0708&L=sanet-mg&T=0&P=21267

Re: Colorado Surveillance Program for Chronic Wasting Disease
Transmission to Humans (TWO SUSPECT CASES)

http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0704&L=sanet-mg&T=0&P=1165

P01.47

Quantifying the Species Barrier in Chronic Wasting Disease by a Novel in
vitro Conversion Assay

Li, L1; Coulthart, MB2; Balachandran, A3; Chakrabartty, A4; Cashman, NR1
1University of British Columbia, Brain Research Centre, Canada; 2Public
Health Agency of Canada, National Microbiology Laboratory, Canada; 3Animal Diseases
Research Institute, Canada Food Inspection Agency, National Reference Laboratory for
Scrapie and CWD, Canada; 4Ontario Cancer Institute and Department of Medical
Biophysics, University of Toronto, Canada

Background: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform
encephalopathy that can affect North American cervids (deer, elk, and
moose). Although the risk of CWD crossing the species barrier and causing human
disease is still unknown, however, definite bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
transmission to humans as variant CJD (vCJD), it would seem prudent to limit the exposure
of humans to CWD.

Aim: In view of the fact that BSE can be readily transmitted to non-bovid species, it is
important to establish the species susceptibility range of CWD.

Methods: In vitro conversion system was performed by incubation of prions with
normal brain homogenates as described before, and protease K (PK) resistant
PrP was determined by immunoblotting with 6H4 monoclonal prion antibody.

Results: Our results demonstrate that PrPC from cervids (including moose)
can be efficiently converted to a protease-resistant form by incubation with elk
CWD prions, presumably due to sequence and structural similarities between these
species. Interestingly, hamster shows a high conversion ratio by PrPCWD. Moreover,
partial denaturation of substrate PrPC can apparently overcome the structural
barriers between more distant species.

Conclusions: Our work correctly predicted the transmission of CWD to a wild
moose. We find a species barrier for prion protein conversion between cervids and
other species, however, this barrier might be overcome if the PrPC substrate has
been partially denatured in a cellular environment. Such an environment might
also promote CWD transmission to non-cervid species, *** including humans.
Acid/GdnHCl-treated brain PrPC was a superior substrate for the in vitro conversion
than PrPC treated at physiological pH. This has implications for the process
by which the prion protein is converted in disease.

http://www.prion2007.com/pdf/Prion%20Book%20of%20Abstracts.pdf

CREUTZFELDT JAKOB DISEASE MAD COW BASE, CWD, SCRAPIE UPDATE OCT 2007

http://cjdmadcowbaseoct2007.blogspot.com/

ABSTRACTS SPORADIC CJD AND H BASE MAD COW ALABAMA AND TEXAS SEPTEMBER 2007

Date: Mon, 24 Sep 2007 21:31:55 -0500

I suggest that you all read the data out about h-BASE and sporadic CJD, GSS,
blood, and some of the other abstracts from the PRION2007. ...

http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0709&L=sanet-mg&T=0&F=&S=...

*** PLEASE READ AND UNDERSTAND THE RAMIFICATIONS OF THIS !!! THE PRICE OF
POKER INDEED GOES UP. ...TSS

USA BASE CASE, (ATYPICAL BSE), AND OR TSE (whatever they are calling it
today), please note that both the ALABAMA COW, AND THE TEXAS COW, both were
''H-TYPE'', personal communication Detwiler et al Wednesday, August 22, 2007
11:52 PM. ...TSS

http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0708&L=sanet-mg&T=0&P=19779

BSE BASE MAD COW TESTING TEXAS, USA, AND CANADA, A REVIEW OF SORTS

http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/

PLEASE NOTE IN USA CJD UPDATE AS AT JUNE 2007, please note steady increase
in ''TYPE UNKNOWN''. ...TSS

1 Acquired in the United Kingdom; 2 Acquired in Saudi Arabia; 3 Includes 17
inconclusive and 9 pending (1 from 2006, 8
from 2007); 4 Includes 17 non-vCJD type unknown (2 from 1996, 2 from 1997, 1
from 2001, 1 from 2003, 4 from 2004, 3
from 2005, 4 from 2006) and 36 type pending (2 from 2005, 8 from 2006, ***
26 from 2007)

http://www.cjdsurveillance.com/pdf/case-table.pdf

BUCKMASTERS

http://www.buckmasters.com/bm/Community/Forums/tabid/60/forumid/14/posti...

http://www.buckmasters.com/bm/Community/Forums/tabid/60/forumid/14/posti...

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

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Joined: 10/25/2007
Posts: 11
Re: CWD FOUND IN NEW HUNT AREA NEAR UCROSS WYOMING

That sucks..... Hopefully we can keep it out of Idaho and Utah.

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