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CWD 1ST CASE DOCUMENTED IN MICHIGAN

Michigan's First Case of Chronic Wasting Disease Detected at Kent County Deer Breeding Facility Contact: Bridget Patrick (MDA) or Mary Dettloff (DNR) 517-241-2669 or 517-335-3014 Agency: Natural Resources

August 25, 2008 LANSING - The Michigan departments of Agriculture (MDA) and Natural Resources (DNR) today confirmed the state's first case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a three-year old white-tailed deer from a privately owned cervid (POC) facility in Kent County.

The state has quarantined all POC facilities, prohibiting the movement of all - dead or alive - privately-owned deer, elk or moose. Officials do not yet know how the deer may have contracted the disease. To date, there is no evidence that CWD presents a risk to humans.

DNR and MDA staff are currently reviewing records from the Kent County facility and five others to trace deer that have been purchased, sold or moved by the owners in the last five years for deer and the last seven years for elk. Any deer that may have come in contact with the CWD-positive herd have been traced to their current location and those facilities have been quarantined.

"Michigan's veterinarians and wildlife experts have been working throughout the weekend to complete their investigation," said Don Koivisto, MDA director. "We take this disease very seriously, and are using every resource available to us to implement response measures and stop the spread of this disease."

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk and moose. Most cases of the disease have been in western states, but in the past several years, it has spread to some midwestern and eastern states. Infected animals display abnormal behaviors, progressive weight loss and physical debilitation.

Current evidence suggests that the disease is transmitted through infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions) contained in saliva and other fluids of infected animals. Susceptible animals can acquire CWD by direct exposure to these fluids or also from contaminated environments. Once contaminated, research suggests that soil can remain a source of infection for long periods of time, making CWD a particularly difficult disease to eradicate.

Michigan's First Case of Chronic Wasting Disease Detected at Kent County Deer Breeding Facility: "Currently, one of our top concerns is to confirm that the disease is not in free-ranging deer," said DNR Director Rebecca Humphries. "We are asking hunters this fall to assist us by visiting check stations to allow us to take biological samples from the deer they harvest, so we can perform adequate surveillance of the free-ranging white-tailed deer herd in the area."

Deer hunters this fall who take deer from Tyrone, Soldon, Nelson, Sparta, Algoma, Courtland, Alpine, Plainfield, and Cannon townships will be required to bring their deer to a DNR check station. Deer taken in these townships are subject to mandatory deer check.

The DNR is also asking hunters who are participating in the private land five-day antlerless hunt in September in other parts of Kent County to visit DNR check stations in Kent County so further biological samples can be taken from free-ranging deer for testing. The DNR is in the process of finding additional locations for check stations in Kent County to make it more convenient for hunters.

The deer that tested positive at the Kent County facility was a doe that had been recently culled by the owner of the facility. Michigan law requires sick deer or culled deer on a POC facility be tested for disease. The samples from the Kent County deer tested "suspect positive" last week at Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health, and were sent to the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa last Thursday for confirmatory testing. The positive results of those tests were communicated to the state of Michigan today.

Audits of the facility by the DNR in 2004 and 2007 showed no escapes of animals from the Kent County facility were reported by the owner. Also, there were no violations of regulations recorded during the audits.

Since 2002, the DNR has tested 248 wild deer in Kent County for CWD. In summer 2005, a number of those deer had displayed neurological symptoms similar to CWD; however, after testing it was determined the deer had contracted Eastern Equine Encephalitis.

More information on CWD is available on Michigan's Emerging Diseases Web site at http://www.michigan.gov/chronicwastingdisease.

http://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,1607,7-186-25806-198865--,00....

MICHIGAN SURVEILLANCE AND RESPONSE PLAN FOR
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE OF FREE-RANGING AND
PRIVATELY-OWNED/CAPTIVE CERVIDS

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/CWD_ContingencyPlan_41755_7.pdf

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/CWDexecsumm_246633_7.pdf

-------------------- BSE-L@LISTS.AEGEE.ORG --------------------

Wasting disease shows up in Kent County deer

by Howard Meyerson | The Grand Rapids Press Monday August 25, 2008, 6:16 PM

A whitetail deer born and culled from a Kent County deer farm has chronic wasting disease, state wildlife officials announced Monday. It is the first time the fatal neurological disease has turned up in Michigan. It's presence is triggering big changes for hunters and deer farm owners.

"It's triggering bait and feeding restrictions for whitetail deer in all of the Lower Peninsula, and carcass handling restrictions in the hot zone," said Becky Humphries, the Department of Natural Resources director.

Hunters who kill deer this fall from Tyrone, Solon, Nelson, Sparta, Algoma, Courtland, Alpine, Plainfield and Cannon townships will be required to bring their deer to DNR check stations. Other hunters will be strongly encouraged to do so.

To date, there is no indication that any wild, free-ranging deer has the disease. The 3-year-old female doe with CWD is the first reported case in Michigan.

Deer farms all over the state also are being quarantined. There are 580 in total, including breeding farms, hobby and exhibition facilities, and ranches where the deer are hunted.

In West Michigan, there are six farms of concern, the Kent County facility where the sick deer was found and five others in Osceola and Montcalm counties, which did business with the other farm.

Don Koivisto, the director for the Michigan Department of Agriculture, said five facilities were quarantined over the weekend. Their records are being examined to trace the sale and transfer of deer. The facilities' names were withheld pending further investigation.

E-mail Howard Meyerson: hmeyerson@grpress.com

http://www.mlive.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2008/08/chronic_wasting_disease_...

Wasting disease shows up in Kent County deer

by Howard Meyerson | The Grand Rapids Press Monday August 25, 2008, 6:16 PM

A whitetail deer born and culled from a Kent County deer farm has chronic wasting disease, state wildlife officials announced Monday. It is the first time the fatal neurological disease has turned up in Michigan. It's presence is triggering big changes for hunters and deer farm owners.

"It's triggering bait and feeding restrictions for whitetail deer in all of the Lower Peninsula, and carcass handling restrictions in the hot zone," said Becky Humphries, the Department of Natural Resources director.

http://www.mlive.com/outdoors/index.ssf/the_grand_rapids_press/

CWD MICHIGAN

http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/1,1607,7-153-10370_12150-29070--,00.html

P04.01

Chronic Wasting Disease in a Captive White-Tailed Deer Farm

Keane, D1; Barr, D1; Bochsler, P1; Hall, M2; Gidlewski, T3; O'Rourke, K4; Spraker, T5 1University of Wisconsin, USA; 2US Department of Agriculture, USA; 3US Department of Agriculture, USA; 4USDA ARS-ADRU, Washington |State University, USA; 5Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, USA

A white-tailed deer farm in Portage, Wisconsin, was depopulated in January 2006, after chronic wasting disease (CWD) had been initially discovered on the property in September 2002. Prior to the depopulation, a total of 22 positive animals had been removed from the property: one in 2002, six in 2003, ten in 2004, four in 2005 and one in 2006. At the time of depopulation a total of 76 animals remained: 47 females and 29 males. Age was assessed by visual examination of teeth at the time of death and revealed 26 adult, 8 fawn and 42 yearling animals. The following tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry for PrPCWD using Ab99/97.6.1: obex, tonsil, retropharyngeal, submandibular, parotid, prescapular, axillary, inguinal, prefemoral and popliteal lymph nodes, recto-anal mucosal tissue and eye. Seventy-nine percent of animals (sixty) were found to be positive in at least one tissue; 49 were obex positive, 58 retropharyngeal positive, 56 tonsil positive, 48 recto-anal mucosal associated lymphoid tissue positive and 4 animals were positive for PrPCWD in the retina. Prion genotype was determined for all animals. ...END...TSS

Monday, June 30, 2008
Risk behaviors in a rural community with a known point-source exposure to chronic wasting disease

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/06/risk-behaviors-in-ru...

Monday, June 23, 2008
Persistence of Pathogenic Prion Protein during Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/06/persistence-of-patho...

Wednesday, June 11, 2008
Transmission and Detection of Prions in Feces

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/06/transmission-and-det...

Sunday, August 24, 2008
HAVE ANOTHER GLASS OF CWD PRIONS COURTESY Dane County Wisconsin Mike DiMaggio, solid waste manager

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/have-another-glass-o...

Thursday, April 03, 2008

A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease

2008 1: Vet Res. 2008 Apr 3;39(4):41

A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease

Sigurdson CJ.

snip...

*** twenty-seven CJD patients who regularly consumed venison were reported to the Surveillance Center***,

snip...

full text ;

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/04/prion-disease-of-cer...

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE BLOG

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

Monday, August 25, 2008
CWD FIRST DOCUMENTED IN MICHIGAN

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-first-documented...

-------------------- BSE-L@LISTS.AEGEE.ORG --------------------

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Posts: 1
CWD 1ST CASE DOCUMENTED IN MICHIGAN

MI. DNR ANNOUNCES IMMEDIATE BAN ON FEEDING AND BAITING IN LOWER MI.

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Posts: 230
cwd, baiting, and tissue infectivity

Thursday, August 28, 2008
cwd, feeding, and baiting piles

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-feeding-and-bait...

Thursday, August 28, 2008
CWD TISSUE INFECTIVITY brain, lymph node, blood, urine, feces, antler velvet and muscle
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-tissue-infectivi...

Tuesday, August 26, 2008
CWD Stakeholder Advisory Group Wednesday, August 22, 2007 11:31 AM

Epidemiologic studies have also been initiated to identify human cases of prion disease among persons with an increased risk for exposure to potentially CWD-infected deer or elk meat (47). If such cases are identified, laboratory data showing similarities of the etiologic agent to that of the CWD agent would strengthen the conclusion for a causal link. Surveillance for human prion diseases, particularly in areas where CWD has been detected, remains important to effectively monitor the possible transmission of CWD to humans. Because of the long incubation period associated with prion diseases, convincing negative results from epidemiologic and experimental laboratory studies would likely require years of follow-up. In the meantime, to minimize the risk for exposure to the CWD agent, hunters should consult with their state wildlife agencies to identify areas where CWD occurs and continue to follow advice provided by public health and wildlife agencies. Hunters should avoid eating meat from deer and elk that look sick or test positive for CWD. They should wear gloves when field-dressing carcasses, bone-out the meat from the animal, and minimize handling of brain and spinal cord tissues. As a precaution, hunters should avoid eating deer and elk tissues known to harbor the CWD agent (e.g., brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils, lymph nodes) from areas where CWD has been identified.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/03-1082.htm

From: TSS (216-119-163-189.ipset45.wt.net) Subject: CWD aka MAD DEER/ELK TO HUMANS ??? Date: September 30, 2002 at 7:06 am PST

From: "Belay, Ermias" To: Cc: "Race, Richard (NIH)" ; ; "Belay, Ermias" Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 9:22 AM Subject: RE: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Dear Sir/Madam, In the Archives of Neurology you quoted (the abstract of which was attached to your email), we did not say CWD in humans will present like variant CJD.

That assumption would be wrong. I encourage you to read the whole article and call me if you have questions or need more clarification (phone: 404-639-3091). Also, we do not claim that "no-one has ever been infected with prion disease from eating venison." Our conclusion stating that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans in the article you quoted or in any other forum is limited to the patients we investigated.

Ermias Belay, M.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

-----Original Message----- From: Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2002 10:15 AM To: [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask] Subject: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Sunday, November 10, 2002 6:26 PM ......snip........end..............TSS

snip...see full text ;

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-stakeholder-advi...

2008

The statistical incidence of CJD cases in the United States has been revised to reflect that there is one case per 9000 in adults age 55 and older. Eighty-five percent of the cases are sporadic, meaning there is no known cause at present.

http://www.cjdfoundation.org/fact.html

kind regards,

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

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Posts: 230
CWD 1ST CASE DOCUMENTED IN MICHIGAN

i don't think isolated is the proper word, until all the deer are tested in all these game farms. lifting quarantines without all animals tested is a bad move in my opinion. ...TSS

Deer breeders welcome news that Kent County chronic wasting case was isolated by Howard Meyerson | The Grand Rapids Press Thursday September 04, 2008, 8:00 AM

Press File Photo Fall is prime time for deer farm owners who sell breeding bucks and does.GRAND RAPIDS -- Test results on more than 50 deer killed and taken off a northern Kent County deer breeding farm last week all have come back negative for chronic wasting disease, Michigan Department of Agriculture officials said Wednesday.

That finding means only one deer, a 3-year-old doe, was found to be infected with the fatal neurological disease. Officials are waiting for test results on four other deer taken off two deer farms, in Osceola and Montcalm counties. Both were breeding facilities that received deer from the Kent County farm, which has not been identified.

"It's a relief that we don't have 40 that are positive," said Steve Halstead, the state veterinarian. "That (result) would suggest that anything that moved out of that herd would be positive."

Deer breeders also are relieved. A negative test means the MDA can start to selectively lift the quarantine imposed on 559 deer farms last week. The quarantine was put in place to stop deer from moving between facilities, possibly spreading the disease.

"This is very good news," said Alex Draper, president of the Michigan Deer and Elk Association, an organization of deer breeders. "I (had) sent an e-mail telling them that the panic level (among breeders) is going up by the hour."

Fall is prime time for deer farm owners who sell breeding bucks and does. The state quarantine prohibited any animals from coming to or leaving the farms, effectively halting their business.

A U.S. Department of Agriculture review of the captive deer trade in Michigan shows there are 26,000 privately owned deer. That herd is valued at $53.8 million, Halstead said.

Negative test results for CWD in the last four deer could mean some quarantines will be lifted starting next week. Agriculture officials are working up the details for how that would happen.

"More positive animals might drag things out," Halstead said. "But if not, we will begin selectively releasing the quarantine to get people back in business."

How just one deer got infected remains a question. Numerous theories are being investigated. Those include the possibility of fenceline contact with an outside deer, said Halstead, who thinks that is unlikely. No sign of the disease has so far show up in the wild whitetail population.

"Another possibility is illegal movement of deer with CWD from another state. We don't have evidence, but we are looking into that," Halstead said.

A rare but possible spontaneous occurrence also has not been ruled out. CWD belongs to a class of diseases called spongiform encephalopathies. Species specific forms of the disease are known to occur spontaneously.

"We know Creutzfeldt-Jakob occurs in one in a million people," Halstead said. "It just develops. And that's presumed to happen with Mad Cow Disease with cattle and Scrapie with sheep. We can make the assumption that it also occurs spontaneously in deer.

Another avenue of investigation, he said, is into deer breeders who do taxidermy. A CWD incident occurred in New York state three years ago after a deer breeder and rehabilitator was found to have a CWD-infected deer.

He was known to have raised his fawns in his taxidermy shop where he worked on a CWD-infected deer shot in another state. The skull and hide scrapings from the shop also were spread on the grounds.

"It was the only positive case in New York state," Halstead said.

http://www.mlive.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2008/09/deer_breeders_welcome_ne...

i don't think isolated is the proper word, until all the deer are tested in all these game farms. lifting quarantines without all animals tested is a bad move in my opinion.

plus, what about the game farm where the one CWD infected doe was found, how many years will that farm be quarantined, due to environmental contamination ???

TSS

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