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Joined: 03/22/2009
Posts: 9
Crimps and Sizing

OK guys I'm new and have been gathering all the info that I can. I just bought all my reloading gear but am not even close to reloading. I need to learn more before I feel I can safely do it.

I debated and read over and over all about full length sizing and neck sizing bc I was looking at the Lee dies. For my purposes, hunting, I do not believe neck sizing is worth the effort and from what I have read may not have a huge impact on accuracy as much as some think.

Now i am debating on the dies and the crimp. I will be doing hunting rifles and pistols. Lee has got me think about crimps bc they have their die sets with the "factory crimp" die.

Can someone elaborate on the pros and cons of the factory crimp die? Is it worth the extra hassle?

I'm just trying to decide what dies to buy. I'm leaning towards Lee as they seem to be the best bang for the buck. All of my other stuff is RCBS.

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Location: Muskoka Ontario
Joined: 09/04/2007
Posts: 351
Crimps and Sizing

I use Lee dies almost exclusivly(sp) I find they realy do a great job.
As for neck sizing over full length sizeing .
1 are you using your reloads in the same gun all the time and is that gun a bolt or single shot?
If it is a bolt gun or a single shot than you will get a lot more life out of your brass if you only neck size, with a bit more acurasey as well.
If you are reloading for a pump or simi than I would full length size to avoid miss feeds and jams.
That is my 2 cents.
Hope this helps
F.K.

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Joined: 03/22/2009
Posts: 9
Crimps and Sizing

I was set on neck sizing but then read where a lot of people discourage it. I would only neck size bolt action rifles and use only those shells in one rifle.

My confusion is that Lee says not to neck size hunting rounds and that high recoil is bad for them. Is this bc of feeding or bc of the crimp? I'm confused as to why they say this. That's why I was asking about the factory crimp die.

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Location: Muskoka Ontario
Joined: 09/04/2007
Posts: 351
Crimps and Sizing

A neck sized round fits the chamber tighter and you may get a jam.
The crimp is always wise for hunting rounds because the recoil can dislodge the bullet or have it walk forward so that it won't feed. The factory crimp is good for bullets that don't have a cantalure(sp) or slot in the bullet for a roll crimp. It holds the bullet more secure in the shell when it is subject to recoil in the magazine.
F.K.

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Joined: 03/22/2009
Posts: 9
Crimps and Sizing

Ok so walk me through this...I'm doing baby steps and crawling right now when it comes to reloading! I want to make sure I know as much as I can before I even come close to reloading so that I can do it safely!

I'm set on the Lee dies I think...

So for my bolt action hunting rifles I can neck size it, then I would use the seating die with a regular crimp.... If that bullet does not have a cantalure then I would neck size, then use the seating die without a crimp, and then use the factory crimp die. Would this be an ideal procedure? This would mean the bullet was crimped and more stable when it comes to recoil and carrying around in the field hunting.

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3206
Crimps and Sizing

Doing baby is a good way to learn. First learn to make good ammo that chambers well and is safe. Later you'll learn to tweek it for accuracy. For now full length everything. If your shooting a belted mag, there's is a great advantage to partial sizing. Then you'll take the head spacing off the belt and put it on the shoulder greatly increasing case life. The advantages of neck sizing for the hunter are hughly suspect to me. But some people swear by it.

As far as factory crimp goes, I never found a need for them in rifle ammo, well for bolt rifles as thats all I use. In my opinion things like collet dies and factory crimp dies are better at promoting sales than any real advancement. If it were not so, we would not have been able to make the quality of ammo we made for years before those dies were developed. Also if they were that good, there wouldn't be the market there is for regular dies.

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Location: Muskoka Ontario
Joined: 09/04/2007
Posts: 351
Crimps and Sizing
cre10 wrote:
Ok so walk me through this...I'm doing baby steps and crawling right now when it comes to reloading! I want to make sure I know as much as I can before I even come close to reloading so that I can do it safely!

I'm set on the Lee dies I think...

So for my bolt action hunting rifles I can neck size it, then I would use the seating die with a regular crimp.... If that bullet does not have a cantalure then I would neck size, then use the seating die without a crimp, and then use the factory crimp die. Would this be an ideal procedure? This would mean the bullet was crimped and more stable when it comes to recoil and carrying around in the field hunting.

Ya I think you preaty well have it, But as Don Fisher said for hunting rounds it might be better to full size the brass.
F.K.

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Joined: 03/22/2009
Posts: 9
Crimps and Sizing

I will probably start out full sizing, but I think I will go ahead and by the Lee deluxe set that comes with the neck sizing die too, just so I have that option later on. I'm suspicious of how much more accurate it would be anyway from what I have read, but the appeal for me is longer brass life. Yes, I'm cheap! lol. I'm no bench shooter or sniper anyway so inch groups at 100 are definitely plenty accurate for 99% of all the hunting applications I would use it for.

Basically the seating die will give it a good stable crimp, that is if I do it correctly. I suppose the only benefit to the factory crimp would be on something like my AR15's, lever guns, and certain pistol ammo?

As for my AR's I was thinking of getting the RCBS x sizer die. Anyone used this?

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Location: Nova Scotia
Joined: 08/17/2002
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Crimps and Sizing

I use the rcbs small base dies for my AR15. It undersizes the casing which allows the round to feed more reliable in the semi's. It works very well.

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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2374
Crimps and Sizing

cre10,
I highly recommend taking a metallic reloading class before you use your equipment. I think it would benefit you enormously. Contact a shooting range, gun club, or your local gun shop. Either that or find an experienced reloader and have them show you step by step and the reasons for things. Just some friendly advise.

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Joined: 03/22/2009
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Crimps and Sizing
WesternHunter wrote:
cre10,
I highly recommend taking a metallic reloading class before you use your equipment. I think it would benefit you enormously. Contact a shooting range, gun club, or your local gun shop. Either that or find an experienced reloader and have them show you step by step and the reasons for things. Just some friendly advise.

Oh don't worry I won't be loading up shells tomorrow! I know my limitations and still have plenty to learn and a few practice runs before I actually do it. A guy that I hunt with has reloaded before so I will be getting tips from him. Also some people down the road are huge into reloading so I plan on watching him load some shells and bounce some questions off him. I just picked up the Lyman manual today. It is soooo much better than the Speer manual that came with my RCBS kit. It's great having another perspective. The Lyman manual has a lot more beneficial info and is easier to decipher. I plan on getting the Lee manual and the Hornady manual too so I can read up some more. Each person has a different way with words so some click better than others.

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