17 replies [Last post]
exbiologist's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: Colorado
Joined: 09/19/2008
Posts: 2399
Primitive

I don't think modern weapons have a place in primitive weapons hunts that take advantage of the rut.  Compounds don't buy you significant range over recurves, maybe 30-40 yards.  Scoped muzzleloaders buy more than 100 yards.  not in the spirit of that kind of special hunt

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 07/13/2011
Posts: 924
I prefer traditional with

I prefer traditional with iron sights and PRB. We can't use sabots, scopes, or pellets here, so even an inline is halfway traditional.

 

I will be using an inline this year instead of a sidelock. It's an older Knight Wolverine. It's a plunger gun that uses #11 cap, and i'll use real BP and a maxi-ball with peep sights. Not traditional, but still just a 75 yd gun for me.

COMeatHunter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 628
I agree with Exbio on the

I agree with Exbio on the primitive hunts.  A weapon with a 200 yard range really doesn't belong to be included in the primitive weapons hunts.  IMO, an open sighted muzzleloader is good for 100 yards or so.  Some might be able to squeeze a bit more out of their effective range, but not too much.

We're putting in for muzzleloader hunts for deer in Colorado this year.  It's a great time of year to be in the woods!

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 07/13/2011
Posts: 924
I've been thinking about my

I've been thinking about my post after I wrote it. I asked myself why am I doing that?

So, the plan has changed. I'll be using my sidelock with a PRB and real black. My range has now been shrunk to 50yds. Sort of bow hunting range. Probably less. I watched an 83 yd bow shot on an elk last night on TV. I sort of believe the yardage, because the arrow had a pretty big rainbow flight to it.

COMeatHunter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 628
We use inline muzzleloaders

We use inline muzzleloaders simply because they are easy to clean and the shotshell primer is very convenient.  I don't like cleaning my gun in the field after I have fired it either, so the black powder substitues that are non-corrosive are what we go with too.  The traditional style of muzzleloaders with flash pans are a bunch of fun to shoot, but I like the convenience of the modern inlines and powders too much to hunt with a traditional gun.  Probably makes me a bit lazy.

Fifty yards is pretty close too.  That said, I have taken many elk in the last 5 years and only one was beyond 100 yards.  Getting within bow range is certainly more difficult, but actually getting a shot while within bow range is the really hard part.  At least with the muzzle loader you can take a good shot on a quartering animal, thread a shot through a window in the timber or put a shot into the chest if the animal is facing you--shots you just can't take with a bow (or shots I wouldn't take with a bow).  That's why I don't archery hunt anymore.  I like eating elk way too much.  With a rifle or muzzleloader, we're eating good.

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 07/13/2011
Posts: 924
I'd never try any shot but a

I'd never try any shot but a double lung shot with a round ball. No quartering shots. So, i'm not far off a bow hunter. They could probably hold the bow drawn longer than I hold up the sidelock too. It's heavy.

I'd love to hunt with a bow and get a whole month to hunt both sexes, but my shoulders are shot.

SGM
SGM's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Canon City, Colorado
Joined: 08/13/2011
Posts: 1013
I like the traditional ML but

I like the traditional ML but I also concider an in-line traditional due to the laws/rules in Colorado. As stated, sabots and scopes have no place in ML hunting. To me if you add a scope and all the other stuff you simply have a single shot rifle. I just hope Colorado does not change its laws about scopes and sabots etc.  

Related Forum Threads You Might Like