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Location: Eatonville, Wa
Joined: 08/26/2007
Posts: 610
cleaning stainless

So Im not sure if this is a dumb question or not but can you use the same cleaning products on a stainless barrel that you would use on a blued or matte barrel? I am a little unsure and would hate to mess the finish up on the brand new rifle

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
cleaning stainless

csumerall, the only dumb question is one that is left unasked. Thumbs up

That being said, I clean my TC Pro Hunter with the same products that I clean all my rifles with and have noticed no problems yet. I use the Otis system so thats my experiance with that. Dont know about any other products on it since I havn't used any on it.

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Location: Eatonville, Wa
Joined: 08/26/2007
Posts: 610
cleaning stainless

Ive always used the hoppes brand of cleaning goods Im sure its fine but ive been wrong at least once before

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
cleaning stainless

Found a page and copied it for you about some heavy solvent use. Its from a very reputable smith and barrel producer.

Cleaning Procedures

The adherence to a strict cleaning regime is an important step on the road towards consistency and the maintenance of accuracy. Gun cleaning procedures, including the removal of powder and metallic fouling from rifle barrels, have advanced dramatically in recent years. Improvements have, for the most part, arrived in the form of chemicals which actually do what they are supposed to do. Please be aware that powder solvents often do not remove copper fouling from barrels.

Although there are exceptions, the amount of fouling in a barrel is, in general, proportional to the surface finish. A well-used or neglected production grade barrel with some erosion or pitting will collect more copper than a well maintained select match-grade custom barrel, providing all other factors (such as bullet type and velocity) are similar. In order to clean effectively, there is a certain amount of equipment which is essential, over and above this, there are other products available which either make the job much more pleasant or protect parts of the rifle such as the bedding.

Before cleaning begins, the rifle must be supported in some fashion, with the muzzle pointing downwards to let excess solvents run out, while keeping both hands free. A wooden frame or vice can serve well, alternatively, proprietary "cradles" are now available from various sources.

A plastic coated cleaning rod such as a Parker Hale of the correct size and length, i.e. as short as possible for the barrel length, is essential. Two rods save a little time and effort. Good quality solid steel rods are available and the decision between plastic coated and steel is up to the individual shooter.

Next to the cleaning rod, the most important item is a good bore guide which fits closely inside the action and rear-end of the chamber. Those which have a rubber O ring to seal the chamber prevent a lot of solvent from running down through the action bolt holes and into the bedding. The bore-guide should protrude far enough from the rear of the action to stop dripping solvents from running into the bedding via the tang. The primary function of the boreguide is to align the cleaning rod with the bore thus preventing brushes and jags from gouging into the chamber or throat and avoiding damage to the rifling while cleaning.

I use spear tip jags and cut patches rather than the traditional serrated jags and wound four-by-two as I prefer not to pull dirty patches back through the barrel. Good cotton patches are absorbent and fit well when used with the correct size of jag. They are also much simpler to use. If you need to use bronze brushes make sure that they are of good quality with a brass core. These brushes are generally cheaper than most of the inferior ones.

Discussions on solvent types and their effectiveness often come to no definite conclusion as personal preference usually prevails. The main types of powder solvents such as Parker Hale 009 and Hoppes No. 9 will remove very little, if any, copper. There are specialist copper solvents on the market such as Hoppes Benchrest, Sweets and Shooters Choice Copper Remover. Both Sweets and Shooters Choice Copper Remover have strong ammonia bases and if not used with care can etch the surface of stainless steel barrels. I do not recommend the use of strong ammonia based products in any stainless barrels. I usually find that unless the barrel is badly fouled that Hoppes Benchrest does a very satisfactory job.

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Location: Eatonville, Wa
Joined: 08/26/2007
Posts: 610
cleaning stainless

thanks for the info

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Location: Mobile County, Alabama
Joined: 09/09/2007
Posts: 310
cleaning stainless

If you are referring to cleaning the outside of the rifle, there are products on the market designed to clean stainless steel. They stink like H**l so be sure to completely remove them from the gun before going to the woods.

The stainless that guns are made of is a lower grade than most folks think of. They will rust and develop dark spots if not cared for. They don't rust nearly as bad as blued guns but are not rust proof.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2363
cleaning stainless

I can't think of any gun care product out there on the market that would be harmful to stainless.

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
cleaning stainless

Any strong amonia based cleaner will western. If used to much it will etch it. The stainless used in rifle barrels isnt like the stainless you see in like knife blades. It doesnt have as much chromium added to it which is what makes stainless have its resistant qualities.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2363
cleaning stainless

It won't if you properly follow the recommended direction on those products. Strong copper removers have the most ammonia and therefore it is important to follow the directions to a T when using them. However many shooters may not be aware that good old Hoppes No.9 also has ammonia in it. It always has contained a certain amount of ammonia and that is why they used to caution about leaving it on nickle plated finishes, because it will react and pit nickle. Though because of the mixture of solvents, rust prohibitors, and kerosene in Hoppes No.9 the ammonia really does not attack carbon steel let alone stainless. I've usually left a thin film of Hoppes on all the exterior metal parts of all my guns when in storage, some have had that thin coat on them for up to two years with no reaction to it. Like I said - I can't think of a gun care product on the market today that will harm stainless (if used properly).

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