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flewthecoupe's picture
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Bushnell Yardage Pro

Okay, I know this thing is on the cheap end of the scale but how can it range a 4' evergreen at 300yds but can't range my truck at the same distance? Really?

Ca_Vermonster's picture
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That is kinda funny.  I

That is kinda funny.  I thought that the range was actually more accurate, and further out, with reflective targets, just like your truck.  But I woudn't think the evergreen tree would do tah.

Maybe there was a big 7x7 hiding behind the tree, but your rangefinder saw it and you didn't..... Wink

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I have had two of the yardage

I have had two of the yardage pro rangefinders now and for me the experience has been the same as yours. Evergreen trees or heavy brush will always give the quickest reading at any range. Sometimes getting a reading at all on an animal past 300 yards has been very difficult. I now have a Zeiss rangefinder and although it costs twice as much as the others at 600 I feel it ia worth it, especially since I have had two cheaper ones that cost the same combined. The Zeiss never fails to get a reading at far past 1000 yards no matter what the target is I'm aiming at. And it does it quickly every time without haveing to wait. The only down side is it's a bit bigger than the others and harder to carry. The Leica would be a better choice there but I got the Zeiss cheaper so I went with that one.

flewthecoupe's picture
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Ok, thanks. Glad I'm not the

Ok, thanks. Glad I'm not the only one with that experience. I didn't actually pay for it, it was a 10yr anniversary gift from my work. The only other thing on the list I would have taken was a chop saw but thought I'd get a little more use out of this.

BikerRN's picture
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Yardage Pro

I used one yesterday and will not be using one again if I have a choice.

I'm using the Yardage Pro Riflescope and find the optical quality to be lacking. I found the optical quality of a $100 Pentax to be better. As for the ranging capabilities I've not had any issues with it on rocks, deer, and paper targets. The range seems to be spot on.

In sunlight the Yardage Pro scope works fine but in dim light, like half hour before or after sunrise or sunset, the optical quality is lacking. I will not use this scope again as a hunting scope for big game. The half hour time period is still legal shooting time in my area but if the scope is not capable then it's for naught. That's the time of day when I've spotted the most game.

I do like the different turrets and being able to select a turret that is compatable with your bullet drop. I just wish the optical quality was a lot better. Use in the field does a lot to confirm if gear is good or bad and lives up to it's advertising and hype.

 

Biker

flewthecoupe's picture
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Dude, that blows for pricey

Dude, that blows for pricey scope like that. I wonder how the Burras Eliminator scope works for light gathering in comparison.

BikerRN's picture
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Off Topic

While this is slightly off topic, being that I'm talking about a rifle scope and the original discussion is about a range finder, the scope I have is part of the Yardgae Pro line and has a range finding feature.

I have a very small sample of Yardage Pro products to compare from, one to be exact, and while I find the range finding aspect to be very good it is not enough of a sample to guage the overall quality of the product line. I do know that for my needs the scope aspect of the Yardage Pro leaves a lot to be desired. 

As for the Burris Eliminator, it may be a much better optic, I think I am done with rangefinding scopes and will revert to a more traditional optic. The Burris would eliminate having to turn the turret once the range is acquired. That alone makes it a more desireable product in my opinion as I often found that at longer distances having to let go of the rifle to turn the turret caused me to lose my target at times. With the poor quality of the glass it was often exhausting to find my target again.

I find myself liking range finders. Bear in mind that my sample pool is small, tiny in fact, and I may have an exceptional one that works better than the usual sample I don't know. I do know that instead of a rifle mounted rangefinder I will opt for a hand held version next year. I've been looking at the Bushnell version with drop angle given that many shots in my area are not across flat terrain.

Biker

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