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Location: Eatonville, Wa
Joined: 08/26/2007
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First things first, don, I send my most sincere apologies, I was having a rough day and I may have read into it more than I should. Ok, so superior would be developing a load and as far as i can gather(bear in mind that im new at disecting a round) the bullet is a .323 which I believe is the same as the 8 mm and then I would have to find the right sized cases or can I reuse my old cases? And I actually have about 100 winchester factory loads right now which as long as Im careful should last a while. How many time is it safe to reload the old brass.

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
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We all have a bad day now and again, forget it. Yes the bullet would be a .323 dia. Why they came up with 325 I don't have a clue. From what I gather at Superior is that if they don't have the cases, they don't list them, they re-size from another case. Perfectly safe but the head stamp would be wrong. I use 30-06 and 308 cases to make several others for which they are the parent round.

How many times you can re-use your cases depends. Hot loaded cases wear faster. If the loads are kept below max, you should get 5 or six loading, maybe more. I don't have data for the 325 WSM but I believe it's the same case as the 300 WSM. If so, then they could be easy to make by simply running the 300 thru a 325 full length die. You end up necking up. Possibly the 7mm is also the same case but stick to the 300 case, easier to neck it up with one pass over the 325 expander plug in the full length die.

If you do decide to start reloading your own, let us know, we'll gladly walk you thru the whole thing. It is quite simple and quick to learn. Each bullet maker has a web site where they list the bullets available. I might add that a downfall with the 8mm Rem Mag was a lack of bullets. That situation has changes but the numbers aren't great unless you go premium bullets. Beware the light 8mm bullets, they are designed for the 8x57 Mauser.

You mentioned not getting home much, are you a driver? I did it for many years and understand the lack of time. Again, you want to do it, let us know. Wish we could give you better leads on factory ammo but it doesn't seem to be anywhere.

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Location: Eatonville, Wa
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what do mean "hot load', I dont mind purchasing the premium cases and bullets, I guess im looking for a good 'jumping off point" Are there any books you know of that have lots of pictures and descriptions that I could kind of get a feel for the whole operation? I am actually a drilling supervisor and unfortunately my region consists of washington, oregon, Idaho, nevada, and wyoming. which leaves me with little time. But, I am definately interested in the handloading.

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A hot load is one that is pushing the upper limit of pressure. Assume that the top loads listed in manuals are hot for now. You'll learn more about reading pressure as you go. There are visual indicators of it and extreme pressures can be seen by measuring cases. Stay within printed guide lines and you'll have no problems.

Find a good reloading manual, Hornady or Nosler are good ones. In the front of each you'll find complete basic instructions. Seems like a lot when you first start but it's not really. Simply put, you take a fired shell and run it thru a re-size die. That brings the case back to SAMMI, Small arms institute, spec's. It will also remove the spent primer. Pulling it out of the die expands the case neck to the proper dimension to securely hold a new bullet. By the way, check and make sure your cartridge is listed. My books are not up to date so it's not in them. But data is easy to find, we'll help you.

Next you install a new primer, load data will tell you which one but the important thing is size and heat range. It's made kind of confusing with all the types out there but needn't be. You'll need either a large rifle or large rifle magnum primer. Forget about the match stuff, you'll gain little other than something to talk about with them.

You are now one stroke up and down on the press and 1/2 sec to seat a primer, windy stuff aside. The next step is to charge the case with powder. The lee kit comes with a powder measure and a powder trickler, to add small amounts of powder to finish the charge. You'll have to adjust the measure to throw a slightly light chg then trickle it up. That charge you dump into the case thru the funnel provided. All that's left is to seat the bullet. It's a simple matter to seat it well the first time. You'll have a seating die to do it with. I don't use a crimp and see no need except in lever action guns and heavy recoilers. I suspect you have a heavy recoiler. The die instructions will explain how th set it for crimping.

Let me know when your ready and I'll tell you how to easily adjust the seating depth to work in your rifle. If your near Cent. Ore, I live about 35mi out of madras, 75 mi from Bend and 75 mi from The Dalles. give me a call and I can walk you thru the whole thing right here if you have a bit of time to spare.

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Location: Eatonville, Wa
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thanks alot don, I'll give it a run. My buddy bought a kit a year ago and still hasnt used it so Ill check it out and go from there, i will let you know how it goes. Right now Im actually working in the roseburg area but every monday changes where Im working at

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