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Joined: 11/12/2009
Posts: 9
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Ripstop is correct. Can I have a cold one for just agreeing? LOL! For the math guys you can write all that down and laminate it and bring your calculators to the field to get it spot on. But check my easy math Ripstop so I dont give any false info....the degree of your shot 0-20 degrees= subtract 10% 20-35 degrees= subtract 20% 35-55 degrees= subtact 30%. These are very quick and easy FIELD calculations true out to 400yrds. If you are shooting up or down doesn't matter. Look at a tree in the ground at it's base compare it to the angle of the ground to gauge the angle. get a range to target, subtract the percentage, hold in the lower third of the chest and fire.

My last shot with a rifle was 354 yrdsshooting downhill at a 40 degree angle. I dialed my dope in at 250yrds. It's a beautiful 95 inch Coues deer mount.

Again these are field calcs. There isn't a significant drop distance of 14 yrds with a rifle.

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Joined: 08/04/2009
Posts: 132
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i dont know fellas i talked to the guys in the lab at barnes bullets and from what they told me i would have to agree with the outfitter guy. i have never put it to the test so i will go out sat and try it with my 223 and my 300 and il post back.

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Joined: 11/12/2009
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Hunter G the coues deer that I shot was with my .223 shooting a 75 grain Hornady BTHP. I will try and find my old dope book with the ACTUAL calcs for the 168 grain A-MAX .308

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Location: Peyton Co
Joined: 01/22/2006
Posts: 90
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roybrown833 wrote:
Ripstop is correct. Can I have a cold one for just agreeing? LOL! For the math guys you can write all that down and laminate it and bring your calculators to the field to get it spot on. But check my easy math Ripstop so I dont give any false info....the degree of your shot 0-20 degrees= subtract 10% 20-35 degrees= subtract 20% 35-55 degrees= subtact 30%. These are very quick and easy FIELD calculations true out to 400yrds. If you are shooting up or down doesn't matter. Look at a tree in the ground at it's base compare it to the angle of the ground to gauge the angle. get a range to target, subtract the percentage, hold in the lower third of the chest and fire.

My last shot with a rifle was 354 yrdsshooting downhill at a 40 degree angle. I dialed my dope in at 250yrds. It's a beautiful 95 inch Coues deer mount.

Again these are field calcs. There isn't a significant drop distance of 14 yrds with a rifle.

By all means have a cold one. Don't really need a reason for that do we!

I am in no way a math major, but it looks like a real good way to quickly adjust your hold. I don't know what to say about who agrees and who disagrees. I guess just do what works for you. I know since I will never be able to afford a guided hunt when I miss I only blame myself.

Goodluck everyone

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Location: Camp David MD
Joined: 04/13/2009
Posts: 175
Found this on a web page seems to make sense,whatever works

whatever works for you Shooting Uphill and Downhill

By Chuck Hawks

The hoary old question of where to aim when shooting up or down hill regularly rears its head. It seems that many hunters understand that shooting at a steep angle changes the point of impact, but can't remember why or in which direction.

The correct answer is to hold lower than normal when shooting steeply up or down hill at long range. (At gentle angles you can ignore the problem altogether over the maximum point blank ranges of hunting rifle cartridges.)

This seems odd to many, and they insist on making the problem more difficult than it needs to be. But the reason is simple. Trajectory, the bullet's flight path, depends on the horizontal (level) range to the plane of the target, not the line of sight range up or down hill. Your eye sees the line of sight (slant) range from your position to the target, which is longer than the horizontal range.

Remember that it is gravity working on the bullet during its flight time that causes it to drop. If you were to shoot straight down, say from a tethered balloon, the bullet would have no curved trajectory, it would travel toward the earth in a straight line, just as if you simply dropped it. Likewise, if you shoot straight up, the bullet travels up in a straight line until its momentum is expended. Again, there is no curved trajectory.

You can infer from this that the farther from the level position a rifle is held when a bullet is fired, the less the bullet's drop will be over any given line of sight distance, whether it is fired up or down. Since your sights are set to compensate for bullet drop, and there is less bullet drop when shooting at an up or down angle, you must hold lower than normal to maintain the desired point of impact. For example, if you are shooting up or down at a 40 degree angle and the line of sight range is 400 yards to the target, the horizontal range is only 335 yards. 335 yards is the distance for which you must hold.

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