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Location: New London,WI
Joined: 08/26/2009
Posts: 59
bullet effect

Just wondering if anyone has any info. on the amount of effect altitude has on a bullet. I live around 1,000 ft. elevation in Wisconsin and have been told by others from here that when they have gone west hunting and shoot their rifles they shot really high some as much as a foot at 150 yds. We will shoot before heading to the field, but just want to know what to expect. thanks

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Joined: 08/04/2009
Posts: 132
bullet effect

yes it does i do shoot with some guys with B BULLETS and what will change your bullets is wind,temp,elev, and sighting inn with a fed bullet and then hunting with a rem bullet or a horndy bullet will also matter and i have learned this from shooting with them. the best way to know what your gun will do is shoot were your at and then go to 10,000 ft and shoot there you have to know your gun. kind like say you run mile every other day with running shoes and one day you put on some big ass hunting boots you will not run the same or feel the same, that goes the same for a bullet. I hope that makes some kinda sense to you good luck hunting this year.

onzaman's picture
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Location: Michigan
Joined: 02/19/2009
Posts: 162
bullet effect

We will sight in there to be sure.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2374
bullet effect

It's true. At higher altitude the air is thinner and therfore poses less resistance to the same bullet at lower altitudes where the air is denser. My advice is to sight-in at the average altitude you plan on hunting at. What that rate is I don't have exact figures for. But I know from many year of flying aircraft that "density-altitude" affects a lot of objects in flight including baseballs being pitched.

Get up above timber line to 12,000 ft and you have much less air density than you will at sea level to 2000 ft.

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Location: Peyton Co
Joined: 01/22/2006
Posts: 90
bullet effect

I put some numbers through Point Blank. This is for a 100gr bullet at 3070fps

I don't know what temperature you sighted in at but I used the following data to give you an idea. Please do not take this as what wil happen. Also remember that shooting up hill/down hill at steep angles will effect your shot as well.

sightin: 100yds
elev: 1000ft
temp: 45F
300yd drop: 10.5"

elev: 8000ft
temp: 28F
300yds
300yd drop: 9.9""

elev: 10000
temp: 28
300yd drop: 9.7"

elev: 12000
temp: 28F
300yd drop: 9.5"

Hope this helps

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Location: New London,WI
Joined: 08/26/2009
Posts: 59
bullet effect

Just want to take a second to thank you guys for the input sounds like shooting once we get there is key. We were going to just to make sure nothing on the rifles got bumped during travel.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2374
bullet effect

Those figures make sense Ripstop. Seems about like what one could expect. Also keep in mind that air temperature plays a role in air density as well. Colder the air the denser it will be. You'll even notice how the sound of the shot will dampen out over distance with much colder air. I can really tell the difference in sub-zero temps.

09Dreamseason's picture
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Location: Cascade, CO
Joined: 08/12/2009
Posts: 73
bullet effect
Ripstop wrote:
Also remember that shooting up hill/down hill at steep angles will effect your shot as well.

don't be fooled by the uphill and downhill effect! this ONLY happens with archery....NOT with a rifle!!

shoot for actual distance "Line Of Sight" when shooting uphill and downhill. You start trying to adjust for uphill or downhill and you'll start making bad shots that aren't placed where you want them to be. I had a guy argue with me until he was blue in the face a couple of years ago and when he held high with the Elk uphill he shot right over their back!

point is: sight in whenever you travel to a new spot to hunt from where you sighted in your rifle last........try NOT to sight-in in the area you're going to hunt in a few days before the hunt though! TOO often I hunt public land where other hunters are blasting away with their handheld canons the day before opening day.........not cool!

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Location: Peyton Co
Joined: 01/22/2006
Posts: 90
bullet effect
JPOutfitters wrote:
Ripstop wrote:
Also remember that shooting up hill/down hill at steep angles will effect your shot as well.

don't be fooled by the uphill and downhill effect! this ONLY happens with archery....NOT with a rifle!!

shoot for actual distance "Line Of Sight" when shooting uphill and downhill. You start trying to adjust for uphill or downhill and you'll start making bad shots that aren't placed where you want them to be. I had a guy argue with me until he was blue in the face a couple of years ago and when he held high with the Elk uphill he shot right over their back!

point is: sight in whenever you travel to a new spot to hunt from where you sighted in your rifle last........try NOT to sight-in in the area you're going to hunt in a few days before the hunt though! TOO often I hunt public land where other hunters are blasting away with their handheld canons the day before opening day.........not cool!

Sorry but your statememt above is not true. Shooting at steep angles does effect bullet path especially at longer distances.

Just curious, why would it only effect an arrow and not a bullet??

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Location: No. Colo.
Joined: 09/07/2009
Posts: 35
bullet effect

I would have to agree with Ripstop. I had this same disagreement and discussion with a hunting buddy recently. He contends that at extreme downhill angles, shooters tend to shoot high, and at extreme uphill angles, tend to shoot low. I believe a shooter will tend to shoot high regardless of whether the shot is uphill or downhill, due to the target being closer in horizontal distance from the shooter than actual line of site (causing shooter to overestimate target distance and erroneously "hold over" the intended bulls eye). So help me and my buddy out here. Who's right? Keep in mind there is a case of beer riding on this one!

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Location: Peyton Co
Joined: 01/22/2006
Posts: 90
bullet effect
nocohuntr wrote:
I would have to agree with Ripstop. I had this same disagreement and discussion with a hunting buddy recently. He contends that at extreme downhill angles, shooters tend to shoot high, and at extreme uphill angles, tend to shoot low. I believe a shooter will tend to shoot high regardless of whether the shot is uphill or downhill, due to the target being closer in horizontal distance from the shooter than actual line of site (causing shooter to overestimate target distance and erroneously "hold over" the intended bulls eye). So help me and my buddy out here. Who's right? Keep in mind there is a case of beer riding on this one!

Here is my data. You multiply the cosine of the angle by the yardage. Here are some examples from 300 yd. line of sight.

300 yards at a 20deg angle
Cosine for 20deg is .93
300 x .93= 279yds
300 yds at a 30deg angle
Cosine for 30deg is .87
300 x .87 = 261 yds
Cosine for 45 deg is .71
300 x .71 = 213 yds

Now depending on what caliber you are shooting and the distance to the target, you may not have to correct your hold. Just like shooting level. It depends on your sight in distance and Point blank range.
Have a cold one for me.

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