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Joined: 10/30/2007
Posts: 58
Browning Gold 10 gauge

Has any one ever had any problems with a Browning Gold 10 gauge not chambering the 2nd round? I sent it back because it did not chamber the last one know I am glad to report that they must fixed it because it will not chamber the 2nd one now! I have no idea what to do. It is a good shooting shotgun but it is like shooting a single shot that it ejects the spent shell but it starts to close then stops!

Troy Miller
http://www.greatamericanhuntingstore.com

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
Browning Gold 10 gauge

First question is, do you reload your own shot shells?
Second question is, Does it lock up in the middle, as in is the shell pointing up to the chamber or is it like just a little bit into the chamber but at an angle and the bolt is stuck halfway? What I mean is... is the face of the bolt contacting the side of the shell or is it getting high enough up to be touching the shell back but just not entering the chamber enough to feed?

Joined: 10/30/2007
Posts: 58
Browning Gold 10 gauge

You shoot then the action goes back the shell is ejected and then the action starts forward then stops the shell is on the lifter. I shoot Federal Premium or Winshester. When hunting you have to pull it back and then turn the gun ouver the shell falls out then slide it forward then pull it back then it will work that time. When cycling the shells thru manulaly it works fine.
Troy

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
Browning Gold 10 gauge

Sounds to me like you have a gas problem then. Have you cleaned your gas module thouroghly? Cleaned out the bolt and reciever and lubed it well? Gas operated weapons can be a little finicky and picky at times. Could also be, and this is VERY rare, that the shells you are using arent strong enough to produce enough gas for operation (too light of a powder charge) but thats again VERY rare. Its usually because of a cleaning problem. Not having the gun in my hands thats about the only thing i can think of.

Joined: 10/30/2007
Posts: 58
Browning Gold 10 gauge

I have only shot 20 rounds out of it. It did this from brand new then I sent it back now it is doing it again. They never told me what they done to it. But I will go down and tare it apart.

Thanks

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Location: Upper Peninsula of Michigan
Joined: 01/13/2007
Posts: 368
Browning Gold 10 gauge

I had a similar problem with a Browning Gold 12 ga 3 1/2". I sent it back to Browning and they fixed it. No problems at all this season. There was a broken part in mine but they included a note with the returned gun emphasing the need for through and frequent cleaning.

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
Browning Gold 10 gauge

Should be that way with ANY weapon. PoPs always made me clean mine well even if I hadnt taken a shot. His favorite saying was "If it left the house it got dirty" I guess it stuck with me.

Joined: 10/30/2007
Posts: 58
Browning Gold 10 gauge

did not fix it.

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
Browning Gold 10 gauge

Ok so it cycles properly every time you do it manualy right? Have you tried going really fast manualy? If it works fine with manual operation then it HAS to be in the gas module. Nothing else that I can think of could cause it other than weak shells ( light loaded) could be the problem. Now if it jammed up during manual op then it could be the feed ramp, shells to long, bolt face out of wack, any number of things. But if all works well with manual then its a pressure problem with the problem you are describing. Now if it wasnt fully pulling the spent shell out of the chamber then it could be "hot shells" I.E. the shells are loaded to hot and expanding in the chamber to tightly and the extractor cant pull them. But what you are describing sounds like the bolt is getting back far enough to eject the spent shell but not far enough back to allow the time for the load gate to send the new round up far enough for the bolt face to contact the brass on the new round, jamming it up. Sounds like its time for another trip to browning to me. Or to a compitent smith.

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Location: Summit, IL
Joined: 10/22/2006
Posts: 706
Browning Gold 10 gauge

Found a really good cleaning regiment by a Browning smith. He also works on Berettas. Here you go. As you can see its a little more detailed to do it properly than just running a swab down the barrel and wiping down the gas piston.

Cleaning

Gather all of the things you will need, and find a clean flat surface in a well ventilated area with good light. Reduce all distractions and give yourself the time to do the job without interruptions.

You will need paper towels, cotton tipped swabs, an old toothbrush, 0000 steel wool or a Scotch Brite scouring pad, a pin punch, rubber gloves to keep your hands clean, a cleaning rod and barrel swabs, chamber brush, canned compressed air, and the tools to remove the stock. The chore of cleaning can be made easier by using a customized cleaning kit like the one made by American Standard Products for the Beretta 390 and 391.

You will also need a spray can of quality gun oil like Browning Oil or Rem Oil and a bottle of gun oil like Break Free CLP or Slip 2000 Lube that will dispense a small drop at a time and a quality spray solvent like Shooter’s Choice Shotgun and Choke Tube Cleaner or Birchwood Casey’s Gun Scrubber. Break Free CLP can also be used as a cleaner solvent, but the parts need to sit a longer time for Break Free to soften the residue

Be sure the gun is unloaded and take it apart using the instructions in the owner’s manual. Use canned air spray to spray all parts. Take the choke tubes, gas piston and gas system parts that have burned on powder residue and drench them with a penetrating cleaner or solvent like Shooter’s Choice Shotgun and Choke Tube Cleaner, Slip 2000 Gas Piston Parts and Choke Tube Cleaner, Hoppe #9 or Break Free CLP and put these parts aside to soak. Moisten a paper towel or a clean cotton rag with your cleaner and wipe all of the rest of the gun parts. This removes the surface grime, old oil and powder residue

The next steps are messy and should be done outside over concrete or gravel. Take each part and spray it with canned air to remove any surface debris and then spray all surfaces with a direct stream of cleaner until it is clean. Pay particular attention to all moving parts and parts with springs Any material left will have to be brushed or removed with a scouring pad. Remove powder residue on the surface over which the gas piston travels with brass brushes, steel wool or a scouring pad. This step includes the inner surface of the Browning piston and the outer surface of the Beretta piston. Excessive powder residue inside of the Beretta gas piston and the piston housing below the barrel should be removed. A number of special tools have been developed for this task. American Standard Products’ Beretta cleaning kit, Briley’s piston brush or a set of Troy Peak’s cleaning brushes all work well for this job.

Remove most of the cotton from a swab, bend it leaving the end longer than the depth of the ports and push it into the gas ports to clean them. Use other trimmed swabs dipped in cleaner to clean the receiver paying particular attention to the action spring area in the end of the receiver and the bolt rails.

Repeat the spray cleaner in the receiver as needed, and spray with canned air again.

Removing the action spring involves removing the stock from the receiver. The tube can be blown out with air and cleaner and then lubricated without removing the spring in most guns. You will be surprised how much dirt and powder residue can get in to the tube. Removing and cleaning the action spring tube and checking the spring is a job that may best be left to a gunsmith. Clean and lightly lubricate the magazine tube and pay particular attention to the cap that separates the shells from the spring.

Clean the trigger group using canned air first and then a vigorous spray of cleaner. Use several cotton swabs get down into the small areas of the trigger. If the swabs come out dirty, spray it down again after using the swabs. Once the trigger group is clean spray with a light coating of light gun oil and wipe off the excess with swabs or a clean cotton rag.

For the barrel, you should use canned air to blow out material near posts of the vent rib and spray cleaner down the bore and in the chamber. Clean the chamber with a 10 gauge brass brush on a cordless drill. A 12 gauge brass brush with a few drops of cleaner can be used to clean the choke tube threads and use a Bore Snake or Tico Tool followed by a light coating of oil and wipe the outer surfaces with oil.

Joined: 10/30/2007
Posts: 58
Browning Gold 10 gauge

Thank you, I will try yhis also. I would have thought Browning would have done something when they had it the first time. They really made it worse. Before it only would not chamber the last round know its every shot.
Troy
http://www.greatamericanhuntingstore.com

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