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hunter25's picture
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Border crossing info

All right guys,

Not a big deal as I'm doing plenty of research myself but was wondering if there's anything special I should know when crossing the border in to Canada. I'll have my paperwork in order for my rifle but just don't want to miss anything as far as that and ammo goes.

Or anything else for that matter. Not going until the last week of January but my passport should be here in a couple weeks and I'm anxious to plan things out. I'll be driving nearly 30 hours from here into Ontario and I haven't been out of the country since I was like 10.

Now my mind is wandering the world looking for what I can hunt for cheap!lol

I'll be going alone as nobody wants to spend the money as my son just rented his first place and my dad decided he doesn't hunt anymore due to a couple missed shots last year.

Thanks for any info.

Critter's picture
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When I went up to British

When I went up to British Colombia last year going in was a breeze. I just told them what I was going to do and that I had a firearm with me. The told me to pull over to the inspection area and 45 minutes later I was on my way. There was no problem taking ammo in but the inspector informed me to pack it seperate from my rifle. I have a pocket on the bag that my rifle was in and had a box of ammo in it.

Now for coming back you should have the US Customs form 4457 listing your personal property such as your firearm, scope, camera, binoculars, and such with their serial numbers. I think that your nearest customs office is here in Gypsum at the airport. I know that I checked and they don't have one in Grand Junction and the next nearest one is in Denver. But you can go into the US side of the border crossing and declare everything but be prepared to wait if you do it that way.

If I was you I would get a folder and place everything paper wise that you have for your trip into it just so that you know where it is located. I didn't have to buy any fuel in Canada but I did notify my CC companies that I was going to Canada for a vacation just so that when they got the charges they wouldn't question them.

What border crossing are you going to go through? I went through the one at Eureka, Montana. I spent the night before in Kalispell and left early the next morning. I would love to go on a wolf hunt but that time frame is close to my February hunt in Arizona, but who knows, it's winter.

hunter25's picture
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 My intention is most likely

 My intention is most likely to cross over through International Falls, Minnesota. Not positive yet as I grew up in Upper Michigan and may go that way. Depends on the weather and how far I get quickly. but most likely enter there and come back through Sault Ste Marie, Mi. on the other side of lake Superior and back through the homeland. That is if time allows but it only adds 2 hours to the trip.

 

 Is the customs form just to prove what you already owned before you got there? 

 

 I'm scheduled to arrive on the 27th of January but will probably take off from here on the 24th just to be safe. I was going to allow a week there but am now planning on 2 weeks off and maybe a couple days more as that will be the last of my available vacation time. I will stay extra if needed to try and connect. I planned to go earlier but he advised to stay away from the full moon as they don't seem to travel teh day as much. So I waited to overlap the new moon when nights are darkest.

 

 

 

Critter's picture
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Yes, the customs form is to

Yes, the customs form is to prove what you took in with you. It is advised on any electronics, camera, firearms, and other personal equipment that has a serial number on it. When I came back into the US last year the officer just asked me if I had the form and if my rifle was on it and didn't even look at it. But......

hunter25's picture
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Better safe than

Better safe than sorry,,,always!

hunter25's picture
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Better safe than

Better safe than sorry,,,always!

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Nailed It!

Critter Nailed it.

Knowing you as I do I would caution you to leave all handguns and handgun ammunition on this side of the border. They aren't too friendly to handguns up north thar.

Do your Customs form, taking the rifle, scope, binoculars, and other assorted stuff with you, to the local Customs office. It will save you a lot of headache. Trust me on that one.

Also, leave any handguns in the truck as well, as ammunition, when you go in to the local Customs office. It's federal property and any concealed handguns are prohibited unless you're an 1811.

expatriate's picture
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Border Crossing Info

Here's a good site from Canada that tells you everything you need to know.  I've transited canada with firearms before and the big thing is to fill out their paperwork ahead of time so you can breeze through their border station.  A big key is to make sure you don't have anything on their naughty list (i.e. handguns or military style rifles, etc).  When I moved up to Alaska I thought I had it all figured out until the Canadian Customs lady told me I couldn't bring my son's Model 94 into the country.  I was stunned and shocked to think I'd have to drive back down into Montana to find someplace to ship it.  I asked her why not, and she said it was because it only had a 16 inch barrel and it has to be 18 inches.  The nice thing about Canada is that it puts its regs on the forms...I looked through the form and pointed to the reference: "There...the 18 inch requirement only applies to semi-automatics.  This is a lever action."  She went back to check with her supervisor and wasn't as friendly when she came back...but she stamped the form.  Have the paperwork filled out before you get there, and you shouldn't have a problem.  The Canadians never asked me to show them the rifles...but the Americans did.  That's why it's a good idea to get the US Customs Form filled out before you go into Canada, so they can't accuse you of trying to import a rifle.

http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/information/visit/index-eng.htm

Critter's picture
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It is always a different

It is always a different story each time you cross the border. When I went up last year the Canadian officer just asked me where my rifle was located in the truck, he had me sit in the office until they completely unloaded the cab of my truck, opened up and throughly went through my duffel's and then stuffed everything back in to the point that I had to repack everything. He then came into the office had me pay my $25.00 Canadian on the CC machine and sent me on my way.

When I cam back through the US officer asked what I had been doing and then asked me if I had my 4457 and if my rifle was on it, I said yes, he then told me to pull over and come inside without even checking it. He then filled out a form for me to import the bear hide that I had and he then wanted to check the skull to make sure there was no raw meat on it. I was then on my way home.

Customs is always fun trying to figure out what they are going to do next.

expatriate's picture
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Border Crossing Info

Customs people are fickle.  I worked in Glacier Park in college and crossed the border a lot.  I had a friend who swore by his Pepsi theory -- have a Pepsi in your hand when you get to the crossing and set it on the dash while you're talking and they'll think you're OK.  It helps if passengers do the same.  I scoffed, but it worked for him every single time.  On the other hand, another group of friends got to the border and the Canadian asked if they were all US citizens.  One of the girls in the back thought it would be funny to say, "Si, Senor."  That got everybody out of the car and the entire car torn apart.  I never had a problem with Canadians...it was usually the Americans who were humorless and prone to abuse.

I will say this, though...politeness goes a long way with Canadians.  If you have your paperwork organized and filled out ahead of time and are pleasant with them, you won't have any problems.

hunter25's picture
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 All good information and

 All good information and thank you everyone for the input. I'll take any tips I can get to make life easier and things go smoother.

 

 Critter, explain the raw meat on the bear skull. Did you have to have it cleaned before bringing it back? If I am fortunate enough to kill a wolf I don't even plan to skin it there but bring it back frozen whole.