30 replies [Last post]
CVC
CVC's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Kansas
Joined: 03/04/2006
Posts: 3586
BINOCULARS

They did and I love them. So clear. Around 8:30 I was looking out my back window. It was nearly dark, but my 3 D target looked like it was day with my new binos.

I practice shooting off my back deck with my bow. Not sure what the neighbors thing, but Think

redrider's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2603
BINOCULARS

I did that same test with mine when I got them, couldn't believe how much light they brought in. Definitely a high quality bino at a reasonable price Yes

CVC
CVC's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Kansas
Joined: 03/04/2006
Posts: 3586
BINOCULARS

I've been practicing with my new bow near last shooting light. With this new bow I went with a release and a peep sight. I wanted to make sure there was enough of an opening to see the pins when it got dark and just to be comfortable shooting with it in those conditions.

Plus, its a little cooler as the sun goes down these days.

redrider's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: NE Kansas
Joined: 03/20/2006
Posts: 2603
BINOCULARS

I have to admit I haven't picked up my bow since the heat wave started eye roll Are you able to see those pins well enough?

Reminds me of a hunt a long time ago. I was set up on a bean field right smack dab in the middle of the rut. About an hour before sunset deer started coming into the field from every direction. Mid sized bucks, young bucks, and does came from everywhere, had to be couple dozen came out. The best and most entertaining rut activity I've ever witnessed. With about 20 minutes of day light left, the biggest buck I have ever seen in the wild came out across the field about 200 yds out. He started out just feeding and hanging out across the field. I thought I was just going to watch him because of the low light, but he started wandering my way slowly and I didn't think there was any way he would make it to my stand. He finally got onto a hot doe and let me tell you he put on a show I'll never forget. He had everything in that field intimidated including me. So as turns out that doe led him right under my stand about 18 yds. I couldn't believe it, I drew back my bow, took some deep breaths, and looked through my peep at my pins................. I couldn't see a dang thing Brick Wall,) I still have nightmares about that one. Didn't get to let an arrow fly but had a hunt I will NEVER forget!

CVC
CVC's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Kansas
Joined: 03/04/2006
Posts: 3586
BINOCULARS

Oh yeah, this heat wave is brutal. I stand on my deck which is covered so that helps, but it gives me practice shooting down.

I can see the pins well. The sight has the fiber optic strands that catch the light and are very bright so I think that helps alot.

Offline
Location: Long Island N. Y.
Joined: 09/27/2005
Posts: 101
BINOCULARS

HOW TO GLASS
Well, what now, you just put he binoculars to your eyes and look through them, right?

Just in case we have new binocular users here, I am going to explain the mechanics of glassing the right way. Not long ago a new hunter in the family was showing me his new binoculars that I noticed were adjusted in the interpupilary distance with a far greater length that I knew his eyes to be set.
When I questioned him if he was not seeing two uncompleted circles when looking through the glasses, he admitted it and was surprised when I told him that the binoculars are supposed to deliver only one circle. I guess he has seen too many movies where the view trough binoculars are shown that way.

So our first business with the binoc is to adjust the interpupilary distance by bending the barrels at the center hinge until our eyes see only one circle; that will ensure that the optical center of the glasses is in line with the center of our pupils.

Second is to adjust the diopter wheel that is usually in the right barrel; as not everybody has 20/20 vision, this wheel will adjust the focus for your right eye. To accomplish the adjustment cover the right objective with your hand or objective cap, look through the glasses and adjust the center wheel until the view is sharp and clear, now cover the left objective and adjust the diopter wheel until the view is sharp.

I used for years to do this in the reverse sequence, adjusting the diopter first and then the center wheel, you get the same results.
Look at the markings at the edge of the wheel to remember the settings in case somebody changes them, (I just put a small drop of white out correction fluid to mark the setting).

The eye relief is fixed and in modern binoculars quite generous, but the eye cups collapse to use the binoculars with your eye glasses, some models can be adjusted to stop midway or at increments so you can get your oculars lenses as far or as close as you want to your eye glasses.

Now you are ready to glass, if yours glasses are 10x they are marginal in how steady you can hold them, people varies but 10x is the magnification that can do with some serious help in holding the glasses.

Sit down and brace your elbows against your knees or sunk them into your stomach looking for the best stable position, grasp you binos with both hands but leave your index fingers free and anchor them against your temples, or alternatively grasp the edge of your cap’s bill to add another anchor point. What you are looking for is to minimize or cancel any tremors, as a jumping up and down picture magnified 10x will not let you appreciate the detail that you bought the glasses for.

With the 8x you have a little more freedom from those tremors, I have a very steady hand (I am a watchmaker) and can hold 8x glasses with one hand for relatively quick looks, but it is not recommended, after all glasses are not for quick looks.

Don’t scan with glasses, your vision should be concentrated in the center of your view, and the glasses when moving, should be moving in very small increments when you are sure that the picture that you are seeing is completely understood by your brain.

The part of the eye that does the stationary looking and captures detail is very small; it is called the macula and covers only two degrees of your vision. When looking through 8x glasses this angle decrease to ¼ of a degree, so if you want to capture the detail that you pay so much money for, keep your glasses steady and look through the center of them.

The crouch and the belly down position are also glassing positions that should be not overlooked, take a tip from African hunters and steady your glasses in the standing position with the aid of a mono pod or shooting sticks or even a walking stick.

In carrying your glasses you can do as the African white hunters do and use a long strap to place them out of the way in the left side of your body at waist level and under your arm, or hang them from your neck but with a very short strap, so they ride high on your chest and will not swing and strike another object when you bend down.

There are in the market some harnesses that will keep your binoculars close to your body when you move around, but they usually interfere with other equipment, at least in my case as I wear a back pack most of the time but for those that carry only the glasses those harnesses work well

All the best
Black Bear

Offline
Location: Gresham, Oregon
Joined: 10/26/2007
Posts: 1
BINOCULARS

Stay away from Pentax. I purchased a pair of DCF 10x42s a couple of years ago. I have never misused the set and they have never been dropped.

A buddy of mine had a paid of Kahles that I peeked through. I matched my Pentax with the Kahles and we both noticed a collimnation (I believe that is the word) problem and I could not quite dial the diopter into focus. I delivered the binos to a local repair station and they shipped them off to Pentax. I got a call from the repair place and they quoted me $210.00 to fix the issues. Fat chance I am sending off $210.00 to Pentax. Looks like I have another doorstop.

My real problem is that I recommended these binos to two buddies and they pack them around on hunting trips. That, no doubt, stops when I make the next two phone calls. I am also done recommending any other Pentax product.

On the other end of the scale is Leupold. I bought a used M77 .257 Roberts from a buddy. It had an old Vari-X II on it. I was carrying it into a hunting lodge (after having too many beers) and dropped the thing, scope first, onto a large rock. The tube bent. Living near Portland, Oregon, I drove the scope out to Leupold and left it for repairs. A couple of days later I got a call that my scope was ready and I could pick it up at their headquarters. I met a rep who took me into what appeared to be the board room and sat me down at the conference table for an explanation of the repairs. I thought that I was about to receive a lecture on stupidity. I certainly deserved it. In any case, he detailed exactly what repairs were performed and he handed me the scope. I pulled out my check book and asked how much. He said that there was no charge and that Leupold gave a lifetime warranty. I informed him that the damage was not Leupold's fault, that I was indeed an idiot, and that I was negligent and probably intoxicated when I dropped the gun. And keep in mind, I was not the original owner. Still no charge. I walked out with a virtually new scope courtesy of a rock solid American company that stands behind their product.

As you might guess, I never hesitate to buy Leupold; although their prices are getting pretty dear these days.

I now own Kahles, Swarovski and Leupold optics. I purchased the Kahles and Swarovski because the word is that their warranties rival Leupold. Have not had a chance to test out that representation.

Just thought that some one might want to know my limited experiences with optics warranties.

Offline
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Joined: 10/30/2007
Posts: 1
8 x 36 Monarchs?

Hey, I am reading some very helpful stuff here, guys. Thanks!

I'm more of a birder than a hunter and I'd like a mid-sized binocular rather than a heavier one. 10X seems a bit shaky in my hands, but I have really been impressed in the past with the Nikon 8x30 E series. It was balanced and not too heavy with fantastic quality and field of view.

I'm considering the Monarchs because I really want to upgrade something fog and water proof without paying a small fortune. Anyone here ever try the 8x36 Monarchs? Any pros or cons as apposed to the 8x42's other than the obvious light gathering?

Any thoughts?

Offline
Location: Long Island N. Y.
Joined: 09/27/2005
Posts: 101
BINOCULARS

LEUPOLD KATMAI 6X32
BINOCULARS

I must be off my rocker. I have binoculars coming out of my ears and I just went out and ordered another.

This time the culprit that captured my heart is the Leupold Wind River Katmai binoculars, a roof prism model that is quite compact and light but offers superior viewing compared to full sized premium binoculars.

I had seen them before in catalogues such as Cabela’s and Red Head, but I never got interested because I thought they were only available in 8x32.
Having recently bought the Leupold Yosemite 6x30 binoculars, I became interested in seeing what others models they offered and discovered that the Katmai were also available in 6x32.

The reason that I am particular about the six power binoculars is that they offer a perfect magnification for the kind of close woods hunting I do.
When available in the 32 mm sized objectives, I am getting a 5.33 mm of exit pupil, giving good quality optics; the right pupil opening for the low light condition that I often glass under. I never saw any reason to own them in 8x32, as I will be getting only a 4 mm of eye pupil: no doubt good for daylight, but no good for the use I put binoculars through.
If I am going to use an eight power, then it will have to have 42 mm objectives to give me 5.25 mm of eye pupil. I already have two great pairs of glasses in that size (the Pentax and the Nikon) and I use them often, but the new Leupold Katmai is going to fulfill the same task, using less bulk and weight, which is important for me in certain instances.

Here is a picture of them together so you can appreciate the size difference. From left to right: the Leupold Yosemite 6x30 Porro prisms, the Leuopold Katmai 6x32, the Nikon Monarch 8x42, and the Pentax DCF 8x42.

I am fifty miles from New York City, so it is not possible for me to go to check binoculars every time I have a whim for them (and it happens often), so I ordered the Katmai over the mail knowing that you will not always get something over the mail that will fulfill your expectations. No such problem occurred with the Katmai binoculars, though: they are great and exactly what I expected them to be for a glass of this price and more.

I performed the usual checks and was amply satisfied with the optical quality and mechanical precision of the glasses. The ergonomics are also great for a glass of this size, and I was well pleased with my purchase.
One aspect of this purchase is worth mentioning: when looking at the Katmai 8x32 that Cabela's and Red Head have in their catalogues, the price for them was hovering around $400 to $420. I bought the Katmai 6x32 over the web for $289 shipped.
Now the question is how they compare optically with the lower priced ($98) Porro prism Leupold Yosemite binoculars, and if the $200 difference is noticeable in the optical quality.
If that difference is there, I can’t notice it! Both glasses performed well in my low light test and both are sharp and with enough resolution to satisfy the most rabid birdie.
We all know that roof prisms are more expensive and difficult to make well, so part of the money goes toward that end, perhaps of influence in the price is the fact that the Katmai are made in Japan and the Yosemite in China; we know that our money buys more Yuan than Yen.

So what is going to happen to the Yosemite 6x32 now that my new love is the Katmai? No problem on that end, since my son already declared ownership of the Yosemite, as he recently took them on a trip to Florida’s Everglades, using them in the Aninha trail and in the Flamingo point.
He came back saying, “Dad, you will never these back; they are great glasses!” Now if I can just hide the Katmai from him until he goes to college in September, I will be fine.

For those that don’t understand the obsession that possesses me, I am here to tell you that there is nothing better than to look through quality glasses. I am just in a rush to finish typing this to go and sit in my patio and look for the red-tailed hawk that has been visiting us here lately.

Cheers,

Black Bear

Offline
Location: Long Island N. Y.
Joined: 09/27/2005
Posts: 101
BINOCULARS

NIGHT OWL 4X NIGHT VISION
COMPACT BINOCULARS

I have owned this night vision binoculars for about seven years. They are made in Russia and feature the first generation of Russian intensifiers tubes that are so popular lately.

It is my understanding that the Russian tubes were not of new manufacturing, but surplus tubes were released into the market. My first unit of these binoculars had a tube that was much dimmer than the other; however the Night Owl Company quickly exchanged them at my request.

As you probably you already know, unlike the older infrared night vision technology, the intensifier tubes do just that: intensify the light that is available (up to 30,000 times according to the instructions) and if ambient light is present, it doesn’t depend on the attached infrared emitter that is placed on top of the binoculars as an extension of the center pivot.

The binoculars enlarge the image transmitted to the oculars by 4 times. Not exactly a long-range pair of binoculars, but really very useful at short distances.

The Infrared emitter has a separate button for its operation. It is not really full infrared (infrared light is invisible) but a good amount of red shows out of the lens of the tube, making the fact that you are watching with them noticeable to humans. For game it really doesn’t matter, as most animals are blind to the red spectrum of light.
When used with a truly blind infrared powerful source (I just rigged a BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight ~2 million candlepower~ with a surplus Israeli jeep infrared filter) the binocular can easily “see” 300 yards away in total darkness.

The glasses weigh 31 oz., which isn't bad for a binocular that is 6 ¼ long by 6 ½ wide and 1 ¾ thick. The barrels of the objective adjust for focus individually. The adjustment is very smooth and easy to move; likewise, the ocular also has an adjustment that is individual to each eye, and it is not a center focus adjustment wheel, like in regular binoculars.
The metal screw in caps covering the objectives have a little pin hole to limit the amount of light that will enter if the binoculars are used during the day, which is mostly done to make adjustments for distance and focus previous to the projected night use. Those metal caps are noisy to unscrew or screw them, so if you're using them when game is near, I recommend replacing them with Buttler Creek or similar spring loaded binocular caps.
The power is supplied by a Lithium 123 3 volts battery that is loaded from the rear where the hinge is in the binoculars. These batteries are more popular than ever, thanks to the amount of tactical flashlights that make use of them.
This is better than the present problem I have of trying to find a number 1 battery for my Israeli surplus infrared night vision goggle (and by the way, if one of you readers know a source for such battery, please let me know).

For a first generation unit, the Night Owl 4x Compact is a very good binocular, well thought-out in its design and construction, with rubber covering to make gripping easier and to deaden game spooking noises. When I first bought them my son was 10 years old and interested in watching game, so we spent a few enjoyable nights watching deer eating apples at the tree and watching over a bear bait in upper Maine, just to see what was showing up. To all you fathers out there, those kinds of memories can last a lifetime and tend to be the greatest ones, especially when that same son is now a college student and interested in watching other types of game. ;) So cherish them well.
Best regards,

Black Bear

Related Forum Threads You Might Like

ThreadThread StarterRepliesLast Updated
Leupold 10x42 Binoculars For Saletinman22107/06/2010 11:53 am
Anyone familiar with Galileo Binoculars?Chris M005/22/2007 15:27 pm
what binoculars for western hunting?tim2409/28/2004 11:04 am
High $ Binocularsdosghooter1609/07/2011 08:20 am
The Minox HG Series Binoculars Have Arrivedgr8fuldoug007/11/2006 14:16 pm