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Location: Washington DC
Joined: 03/11/2010
Posts: 12
Re: Basic Knife Care

Cool, I use the Wave too Thumbs up . I had an old Leathman that didn't lock up and I lost it. So, I got the Wave and I love it. When ever I'm out and about I carry my Wave and a SOG Flash II. Now if I'm out in the woods at all the Buck 110 comes too. The Flash fits in my pocket with a nice metal clip and is real light weight and very discreet. I have the black handle and blade. The handle is made out of a real strong glass/plastic. If you don't know about the flash, it's an assisted opening knife. NOT a switch blade, but once you give the thumb stud a little push it springs open and locks in place. Very cool Big smile I call it my handy dandy knife. Ya. about the oiling. It's just something I do because I would rather not have the chance to see rust even get a start on my knives. They are both in near perfect condition and I want to keep them that way. Oh ya, the Buck 119 is a big knife and I only bring that out when I go dear hunting and/or I'm going to be in the middle of nowhere. Never know when a big knife will save the day, or your life. Makes a great field dressing and skinning knife too. Thanks for the reply. Happy hunting and stay safe.

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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2368
Re: Basic Knife Care

I have a Buck 119 too. I bought it years ago, and now I often wonder why. It is a big knife, larger than I prefere for a hunting knife. I tried using it to gut a mule deer once and quickly gave up. Had to finish the task with a smaller knife. That 119 was just too cumbersome and difficult to use for field dressing. I suppose if I was stranded and that was the only knife I had with me I could put it to good use. But, with better choices available to me it always stays home along with my other useless knives - KaBars and USMC Ontario knives, etc. I generally find it difficult using a hunting knife that has a blade longer than 4 inches. If I need something large enough for chopping in the outdoors I'll bring along a hatchet or axe. My rule for knives as I've become accustomed to is anything between 3 inches to 4 inches in blade length for both hunting and general cutting tasks, that is unless I'm using a fillet knife then I go longer.

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Location: Washington DC
Joined: 03/11/2010
Posts: 12
Re: Basic Knife Care

Yes! It's a big knife!I Maybe it doesn't look big next to me. I'm 6' 5" tall. I guess when I got it I didn't know better, and it kind of grew on me. I guess one should use a knife that feels safe in their hands. I like the 110 folder a lot too. I just got a Buck Vantage Select. I really like it as a pocket knife. Not bad for a $30 Dollar knife. I tend to buy a lot of knives just to try them out. This Buck I just got is OK. Sometimes I get burned. This time I don't think I did. Thanks for your input. Happy hunting and stay safe. Big smile

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Location: Washington DC
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Posts: 12
Re: Basic Knife Care

I've been doing some thinking. I have learned over the years to listen to others and update my thinking if I think it would be a good idea. I have decided to start using mineral oil to keep my knives oiled. Here is a link to a place that sells a food safe oil that is pure and made just for working with food.http://www.steoil.com/catalog.asp?productgroup=70fg I'm going to start using this and see if it works out.

WesternHunter's picture
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Re: Basic Knife Care

Good link. Sounds like their product is safe. Another thing you could also use that's fairly readily available at many hardware store or even at Home Depot is Norton's Honing Stone Oil. It's distributed by Norton Abrasives for use on their stones. It's nothing more than a highly refined and purified mineral oil.

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Location: Washington DC
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Posts: 12
Re: Basic Knife Care

Thanks for that tip. See, if enough people start talking about something, good ideas will come about. Big smile

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Re: Basic Knife Care

I also thought I'd bring up a bit about sharpening. Not how to, but when to. I know how to, but it's one of those things that I have to physically hands-on show in order for it to be beneficial. I've seen good knives that have had literally more than half of their good steel ground away within the first 5 years of it's life because their owner thought that using a course stone or grinder was necessary everytime the blade became a tad bit dull. That's terrible!!

Once you've obtained a good keen and durable edge on your knives, keep that edge maintained as long as you can. Knives dull with use, but don't be in too much of a hurry to touch them to a honing stone yet. In fact first thing to do when your knife stops cutting as well as it used to stop and not to let it get too dull. Take a butche's steel or a fine meat packer's steel and realign the micro edges with a few 20° swipes. Next use that same angle and run both sides of the edge along an ultra fine ceramic rod. Lastly use a razor strop to finish it off, but only use the strop if you know what in the heck you are doing. Not knowing how to use a strop correctly can rake your edge off. Keep that up until your edge is sharp again and you can cleanly cut free hanging notebook paper with ease. Use that method every time the blade starts to dull.

When the fine butcher's steel, ceramic rod, and strop are no longer effective in making your edge keen then it will be necessary re-establish the edge with a fine or medium grit honing stone. Avoid too shallow of a bevel angle. Shallow angles make for very razor sharp edges, but also yield a very weak edges that dull, roll, and chips easily when going into some hard use. An angle of 18° to 23° is plenty good for outdoor knives and yields a sharp yet durable edge. This method will keep your blades sharp without wearing away your blades down to nubs. Only use a course stone if your edge has been raked off, or dulled flat, or severly neglected and a new bevel needs to be re-established or if you need to remove and small nicks. Hope this helps.

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Location: Washington DC
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Re: Basic Knife Care

This is great advice. I too don't over do it. I use a diamond whetstone. I use the extra fine at 1200 to get it back to a razor edge. Then I hone it with an extra extra fine at 8000. This will hone a blade back to a razor edge with just a swipe or two on each side and is perfect for keeping that keen edge on the blade. Remember, A diamond stone is very abrasive and will take your blade away if you're not very gentle. Even the 1200 stone can bring back a razor edge with just two or three swipes. One more thing, when using a diamond stone NEVER use honing oil, only use it dry or with water.

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