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jaybe's picture
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Baiting is Likely to Return to Michigan's Lower Peninsula

According to Ross Mason, DNR Wildlife Division Chief, baiting is likely to become legal again after a three-year moratorium since CWD was discovered in a Kent County deer in 2008.

After three years of testing, including 33,000 deer and 1,500 elk, no evidence of CWD has been found in any of the animals.

Ross said that while he was personally opposed to baiting from a biological perspective, it is the Natural Resource Commission that makes the decision, not the DNR. 5 of the 7 members on the NRC are sympathetic to baiting.

Ross believes that the discussion to reinstitute baiting as a legal practice in the Lower will come up at the March 10 meeting of the NRC.

 

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Interesting.  Funny how they

Interesting.  Funny how they would allow it, especially after banning it in the first place to CWD.

I would think that they would continue to ban it, especially since CWD is still spreading.

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I'm not sure how much of an

I'm not sure how much of an effect biating really has on the spread of CWD. I would be willing to bet that the suppliers of feed that lost all their revenue put a lot of pressure on the get it back though. At least in the U.P. where I'm from feed supply is a pretty big business in itself.

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It's all politics guys, plain

It's all politics guys, plain and simple.  If the biologists could prove baiting causes the spread of the disease, then they would have a good reason to continue the ban, but they can't and it's all conjecture.  Personally, I think anybody that relies on a bait pile is simply lazy and doesn't want to scout and spend the necessary time outdoors to hunt properly.  Some will say that sitting by a corn or alfalfa field is the same thing and I say baloney.  You still have to pattern them in order to know how to set up using their movements, the wind directions, etc.  It's rather ironic that during the entire time this baiting ban has been in effect up here, the gas station/C stores still have had about as much of it out by the pumps as they always did because it isn't illegal to sell it, just use it, LOL!!

jaybe's picture
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"I would think that they

"I would think that they would continue to ban it, especially since CWD is still spreading."

 That's the kicker - it isn't continuing to spread in this state. Along with the NRC's original plan was that they would only initiate "control" measures if CWD was found in the state or within 50 miles of the state. I know that Wisconsin has some CWD areas, but apparently it's not within the 50 mile range.

And - as has been stated, there is no hard evidence to prove that baiting is a factor in it's spread - it's only a theory at this time.

I have hunted over bait, and have hunted without it. Overall, it has helped me kill deer during archery season. But if I had my way, I'd rather it was left as is - no baiting. I think it would make for better hunters down the road.

 Sorry, my quotes didn't work right.

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Well, in general, feeding

Well, in general, feeding deer will not result in the spread of CWD, unless........

You have a really, really high concentration of deer.  The way it is spread, is through direct contact.  And, if the deer are bunched up together, feeding out of the same pile of food, they will be bumping noses, exchanging fluids.  In that manner, it makes sense.

That's where CWD first spread wildly was in captive elk herds. With them being in the same fenced in area, feeding out of the same piles or troughs, they were in contact alot.

Now, are you very likely to see that happen in 99% of the cases out there?  No, probably not.  But, it does happen (See photo below) Wink

 

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Topgun 30-06's picture
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CA---The exact same thing

CA---The exact same thing happens in the wild when they herd up in cedar swamps of the northern states during the harsh winters we have up here.  Even when they aren't herded up you will see a lot of contact between them when you are out hunting, but I would not argue that baiting/feeding does bring a lot more into contact with each other.  Once the ban was put in effect up here in MI, I was in high hopes that it would be forever, but there is just too much politics and money doing the talking, instead of the G&F being able to do the management.

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