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Bad Apples(local hunt club)

Problems have existed for years with a certain group of hunters here in my area. I could tell many stories of unethical events and incidents caused by this group of heathens, but we won't go there. We've had an albino doe in the neighborhood for 3-1/2 years, and she's become almost a pet. We enjoy having her come up in the yard, and so do the other neighbors. A recently widowed lady who has land adjoining my farm lives back off the road by herself, and since her husband's passing, she has really enjoyed the 'company" of this deer. A local hunt club, that only hunts with dogs promised a year or 2 ago that they knew about this deer, and would never kill it. Last Thursday, they put the dogs in back here on the back side of my property, and ran several does out, with one of the hunters killing the albino. Then, the deer was thrown up on the dogbox and "paraded" right by us neighbor's houses so we could see. I've lived here all my life, and I've hunted with clubs that used dogs before, but back in the good old days, the older generations of hunters respected landowners, and didn't do things to jeopardise the sport. Now, these old guys are gone, and the "grandchildren" of them are running the clubs, and they don't give a damn what they do, or who they offend. I certainly hope that other dog-running hunt clubs aren't as bad as the one here. I don't see how they could be, or else this practice would have been banned already. I enjoy hunting from a treestand now, when there are not dogs all around me in my own woods. 

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Location: S.E. Michigan
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Sound like a real nice bunch

Sound like a real nice bunch of fellers there!

Around here we call them 'slobs' - but I think in the case of those guys, that would be a compliment. Yuk!

 

Tndeerhunter's picture
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Albino deer

If the deer is/was a true albino, are you sure the DNR allows them to be shot? I'll not comment on the laws, right or wrong, but it is illegal for an all white or albino deer to be shot in many states. Even if it's legal in your state, it might not be a bad idea to simply make a call to the local warden and play "dumb" asking if it's legal or not to shoot one there and simply relay the circumstances. It might well be a very good thing to simply have the local game control people keeping an eye on such a group. They would love to ticket them if they are doing illegal hunting, I'm sure of that! Yes

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Thanks for the reply.

Tndeerhunter wrote:

If the deer is/was a true albino, are you sure the DNR allows them to be shot? I'll not comment on the laws, right or wrong, but it is illegal for an all white or albino deer to be shot in many states. Even if it's legal in your state, it might not be a bad idea to simply make a call to the local warden and play "dumb" asking if it's legal or not to shoot one there and simply relay the circumstances. It might well be a very good thing to simply have the local game control people keeping an eye on such a group. They would love to ticket them if they are doing illegal hunting, I'm sure of that! Yes

I've heard that in some areas of the country, albinos are illegal to kill. Around here, you can get away with almost ANYTHING if it's hunting-related. There's nobody to call if you have a problem. Deputies don't bother with that type of thing, and trying to reach game warden is usually a joke. That's what makes this area so attractive to "slob hunters" 

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something should be done

GoRving wrote:

Tndeerhunter wrote:

If the deer is/was a true albino, are you sure the DNR allows them to be shot? I'll not comment on the laws, right or wrong, but it is illegal for an all white or albino deer to be shot in many states. Even if it's legal in your state, it might not be a bad idea to simply make a call to the local warden and play "dumb" asking if it's legal or not to shoot one there and simply relay the circumstances. It might well be a very good thing to simply have the local game control people keeping an eye on such a group. They would love to ticket them if they are doing illegal hunting, I'm sure of that! Yes

I've heard that in some areas of the country, albinos are illegal to kill. Around here, you can get away with almost ANYTHING if it's hunting-related. There's nobody to call if you have a problem. Deputies don't bother with that type of thing, and trying to reach game warden is usually a joke. That's what makes this area so attractive to "slob hunters" 

 

In all due respects, I stand behind my previous posting suggesting doing some research and find  out if game laws have indeed been broken. Call the DNR repeatedly. Write letters to the local game warden (return receipt requested). Heck, write a letter to the editor of a local newspaper. A warden would be very foolish to turn a head to a blatantly illegal act, when it's been printed in the newspaper.

My point is that if you want something to actually be done, put some effort into it, instead of simply telling us. If the act you mention is a perfectly legal one, then it is instead a lesson to you about hunting ethics. Hunting ethics can not all be covered with hunting laws. But they must be decided individually. No one can completely legislate ethics.

I wish you luck in having some type of law enforcement (game or civil) look into the goings on of these hunters. If they are indeed poaching, then something absolutely should be done. They have now crossed the line of ethics and legality and are no longer hunters, but rather law-breakers and poachers now and should be dealt with as such!

Good Luck!

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If the local authorities or

If the local authorities or game warden won't respond to any calls, try contacting county commissioners or your state representative. There has been problems with rogue hunters in this area in the past. Most of the time, the game warden wants to catch them while in the act. But there again, if they aren't breaking any laws, then the game warden won't be able to do anything. In that case, the local commissioners/state representative should listen to your complain and enact local ordinances to limit where dog hunters can let out their dogs.
For example, here the local commissioners enacted an ordinance that requires a hunter to have written permission of the landowner to be able to hunt/trespass on a piece of land. Also, they require hunters to be at least 8 feet off of the ground while hunting. This is to keep dog hunters from pulling off the road and shooting from the ground.
Find someone who will listen and tell them your concerns.
Good luck and good hunting!

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Location: Florida,USA
Joined: 08/21/2003
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Mabe try this?

Perhaps you could try and convience your local state represenitive to model a statute similar to the one we have in Florida. This was the results of similar complaints statewide and particularly in NW Florida.

Here are the 2 most important regulations from the Florida Hunting Regulations Handbook. and can be referenced here: http://myfwc.com/docs/RecreationActivities/2010-11_HuntingRegulations.pdf

 

 

Statewide deer-dog registration:

 

 

 

Deer hunters using dogs on private properties in Florida must obtain a no-cost registration from the FWC. Registration requirements apply to the deer-dog training season and during any open deer hunting season when it is legal to take deer with dogs. Registration may be issued to landowners, hunting clubs or anyone having rights to hunt the property. Once a registration number has been issued, the unique number must be affixed or attached to collars of dogs used to hunt deer on registered properties. Hunters also must possess copies of the registration while hunting. To comply with the rule, deer-dog hunters on private lands must have registration numbers on their dogs’ collars; possess copies of the registration; and keep their dogs on registered properties. Applications are available at an FWC regional office, county tax collectors’ offices and MyFWC.com/hunting. Applications must be submitted no later than 30 days prior to the final day of general gun season in the hunting zone where the property is situated.

 

Trespassing

The possession of a hunting license does not authorize a person to trespass onto private land. Obtain landowner’s permission before entering private land. Trespassing while possessing firearms is a felony punishable by imprisonment up to five years and/or a fine of up to $5,000. For more information, contact an FWC regional office. The Florida Legislature created the Voluntary Authorized Hunter Identification Program. Landowners participating in this program notify the local sheriff’s office and FWC to provide hunters with written authorization to use their property. Anyone found on properties enrolled in the program without landowners’ written authorization can be charged with trespassing.

 

 

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