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With a lot of people trying

With a lot of people trying to guess the weight of their backpack is like trying to get them to tell the truth about a fish that they caught when nobody was around.  That and with them thinking that the pack has to weigh more than what the scale tells them is hard to admit.  I know that when I first started to use a back pack for hunting figured that it was tipping the scale around 50 poinds, that is until I weighed it and found that it was closer to 20 pounds.  So anymore when somebody says that their pack weighs 100 pounds I give the the same smile that I give when they say that the elk that they shot was 600 yards away and weighed 1000 poinds.  Not to mention that the fish that they are eating is only 10 inches instead of 20. 

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LOL

Critter wrote:

With a lot of people trying to guess the weight of their backpack is like trying to get them to tell the truth about a fish that they caught when nobody was around.  That and with them thinking that the pack has to weigh more than what the scale tells them is hard to admit.  I know that when I first started to use a back pack for hunting figured that it was tipping the scale around 50 poinds, that is until I weighed it and found that it was closer to 20 pounds.  So anymore when somebody says that their pack weighs 100 pounds I give the the same smile that I give when they say that the elk that they shot was 600 yards away and weighed 1000 poinds.  Not to mention that the fish that they are eating is only 10 inches instead of 20. 

+1

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pack weight

Critter wrote:

With a lot of people trying to guess the weight of their backpack is like trying to get them to tell the truth about a fish that they caught when nobody was around.  That and with them thinking that the pack has to weigh more than what the scale tells them is hard to admit.  I know that when I first started to use a back pack for hunting figured that it was tipping the scale around 50 poinds, that is until I weighed it and found that it was closer to 20 pounds.  So anymore when somebody says that their pack weighs 100 pounds I give the the same smile that I give when they say that the elk that they shot was 600 yards away and weighed 1000 poinds.  Not to mention that the fish that they are eating is only 10 inches instead of 20. 

Amen... It's not that hard to hop on a scale and figue it out.

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ya i feel the same way. i

ya i feel the same way. i know it is a case of "my dad can beat up your dad"

i guessed my pack this weekend at 50 until i got home and it was actually 65 on the scale...

so does that make my 5 pound fish 6and a half...sweet!

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Weight

flyguyskt wrote:

ya i feel the same way. i know it is a case of "my dad can beat up your dad"

i guessed my pack this weekend at 50 until i got home and it was actually 65 on the scale...

so does that make my 5 pound fish 6and a half...sweet!

I wished that they would do that. 

What I was really getting at is that there are very few people that can guess a weight just by lifting it unless they do a lot of it and they always expect it to weigh more.  It is like the joke why men can't measure anything. 

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I got you critter, thats why

I got you critter, thats why i always weigh my pack so i know how much it weighs

Location: From Grand Junction CO, stationed in Germany
Joined: 08/01/2010
Posts: 533
158 lbs

 

Once upon a time, when I was young and stupid (17 years old), I tried my first back country bow hunt.  I was 5’11” and 190 lbs, the pack was an old frame pack and I stacked 158 lbs on it. (I weighed it on the bathroom scale before I left the cabin.) I hiked from about 8,000 ft to 10,000 ft and only covered 3 ½ miles.  I stayed out there for 5 days. At the time I didn’t know any better and I thought I was invincible. I like to think I learned a valuable lesson during that week.  I will never do something stupid like that again.

Now days I have spent the money to live in the backcountry comfortably. I’ve put on some mucel since high school, I’m 6’ and 220 but I keep my 3 to 14 day packs to between 30 and 75 lbs now days. Here is my list of supplies I take with me. (I took a page out of Cameron Hanes book)

1. Eberlestock just one backpack with the supper spike duffel and water bladder.
2. Marmot Hydrogen sleeping bag
3. Coleman Avior x2 tent
4. Them-a-rest z-lite sleeping pad
5. Energizer head lamp
6. Snow peak Titanium cookware and stove kit
7. Katadyn vario water micro filter or 3 liters of water per day
8. MREs to eat
9. Clothes
10. Hunting gear (bow or rifle)

Depending on the area you go into and the water availability there you can lighten the load considerably by using the water micro-filter instead of packing in tons of water, which was my mistake on my first trip.

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I agree on the young and

I agree on the young and dumb.  When I was 18 I loaded up an old military pack with provisions for a week with consisted or more cans than dried food along with an old sleeping bag and a big 6 man canvas tent and did a 3 mile hike from 7,000' up to 10,000'.  At that time I was 6'5" and around 150 lbs.  I would hate to try to figure out what that thing weighed, I know that it felt like a lot.  Now days I don't even like packing out an elk very far but then that is more of a need than a want to. 

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What?

Archery_hunter33 wrote:

 

Once upon a time, when I was young and stupid (17 years old), I tried my first back country bow hunt.  I was 5’11” and 190 lbs, the pack was an old frame pack and I stacked 158 lbs on it. (I weighed it on the bathroom scale before I left the cabin.) I hiked from about 8,000 ft to 10,000 ft and only covered 3 ½ miles.  I stayed out there for 5 days. At the time I didn’t know any better and I thought I was invincible. I like to think I learned a valuable lesson during that week.  I will never do something stupid like that again.

Now days I have spent the money to live in the backcountry comfortably. I’ve put on some mucel since high school, I’m 6’ and 220 but I keep my 3 to 14 day packs to between 30 and 75 lbs now days. Here is my list of supplies I take with me. (I took a page out of Cameron Hanes book)

1. Eberlestock just one backpack with the supper spike duffel and water bladder.
2. Marmot Hydrogen sleeping bag
3. Coleman Avior x2 tent
4. Them-a-rest z-lite sleeping pad
5. Energizer head lamp
6. Snow peak Titanium cookware and stove kit
7. Katadyn vario water micro filter or 3 liters of water per day
8. MREs to eat
9. Clothes
10. Hunting gear (bow or rifle)

Depending on the area you go into and the water availability there you can lighten the load considerably by using the water micro-filter instead of packing in tons of water, which was my mistake on my first trip.

That is crazy! What did you have in your pack? A couple cases of beer haha

Location: From Grand Junction CO, stationed in Germany
Joined: 08/01/2010
Posts: 533
3 gallons of water

I had 3... yeah 3 gallons of water and some canned goods

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