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numbnutz's picture
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average shot for lopes

what would you say the average shot distance is on a lope with a rifle and also a bow? just wondering if i should keep applying for a rifle tag or try it with my bow. I'm good with my bow out to 60 yrds.

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Well, the most common bow

Well, the most common bow hunting for lopes is focused around water holes, from some sort of blind.  Those shots will indeed be out to 60+ yards, so you could be okay there.  rifle can be as far as you are comfortable shooting.  Most of the lop hunting is flat terrain, and you can spot and stalk goats from a mile away.  They will see you coming if you're not careful, so you will need to be ready for a decent 200-300 yards shot.  If you are hunting in an area with rolling hills or other terrain changes, you may be able to get closer though.

It comes down to the challenge.  Is it about just getting meat?  If so, then I would rifle hunt, as that would be the "easiest" way.  However, if you are in it for the challenge, then archery huting for them would certainly be that.  I can't think of an animal that would be harder to hunt with a bow.

I plan on trying next year if I get a chance, and I will be using a rifle.

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I bow hunt and rifle hunt in

I bow hunt and rifle hunt in the same area and I will tell you this.  As far as a bow goes we set up on water holes and natural springs and the most our shot would be is 60 yards.  Of all the antelope we have killed with a bow the farthest was 52 yards, and the shortest was 10 yards.  If you are thinking abnout bow hunting them I would make sure you are practicing out to 60 yards at least.  With that said I do not think I persoanlly would take a shot at more tahn 60.

As far as rifle we hunt the excazt same areas and we usually kill most of the antelope with a rilfe at about 100 yards as we do not let them get to close as wer are hunting with out a blind.  I shot one this past season at 269 and my wife shot one last year at 255 yards.  That is the two fartest shots we have taken.  The closet was 35 yards which I also shot last year.  At 35 yards it leaves one heck of an exit wound, I have a pic but it is rather graphic.

 

I would say the average for a bow is 45 yards and rifle is 200.

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with a bow, I've stalking

with a bow, I've stalking into range under 50 yards on a pronghorn buck (actually, there were 8 bucks, all bedded and facing different directions, like they do) - but I got to 49 yards from the nearest, and was able to draw and get a shot off without being detected

antelope hunting with a rifle, the last buck I shot was about 80-90 yards away - and the last doe was about 175

the year before that, I took a buck pronghorn at 380 yards - and was prepared to shoot even farther if necessary

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300 yds

My own sort of benchmark for a long shot with a rifle is over 300 yds.  I have taken 2 that were quite a bit farther than that but I've found there is seldom any need to.  Everywhere I've hunted in CO and WY I've found that it has not been that difficult to get within comfortable rifle range.

Can't comment on bow.

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Location: Springfield, OR
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when I last drew a tag in

when I last drew a tag in Oregon (2007), it was a rough year
the horn growth was way down, due to drought
and all my scouted areas had several wildfires right before season
it left me scrambling, and I shot the first buck I had a chance at - he was 380 yards away
my partner's first opportunity was at about 375

in Wyoming, it's a totally different story - they've got so many goats, you can always count on another chance if you blow a stalk, trying to close the distance

CVC
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I have shot four goats. One

I have shot four goats.

One was at 300, the next at 200, then 75 and finally 350 yards so it will vary.  Personally I liked the 75 yard shot best.

I thought I was going to have to make a long shot on him, but then he started following does right up to me.  I was able to shoot him at 75 yards which is sweet. 

I'll do the long shot, but prefer the shorter ones.

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My longest shot on a

My longest shot on a pronghorn was right around 470 yards or so. I used a rangefinder and I would have to look up the story on here to get the exact range but it was right in there. The longest I have seen taken (or seen harvested I should say because you will see people taking just stupid shots:a2) was 550 yards. That was my brother that took that shot and that story is posted on the site. I have spotted for guys that have taken pronghorn at around a hundred yards and guys from my camp have taken them with a rifle from less than fifty. Like others have said, it can really vary quite a bit.

I haven't hunted them with a bow myself (although I am throwing the idea around for next year) but from what I have heard my buddies say and from what I have seen on the site, you need to be prepared for a 50-60 yard shot. Or just pass on those opportunities and wait for a closer one because it sounds like it does happen. But if I were hunting them I would be ready for a 60 yarder.

CVC
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The distance for archery

The distance for archery shots is going to be dictated by the manner in which you are hunting.  If you're hunting over a water hole like many archery antelope hunters do, then the shot will be in the range of 20-30 yards with 40 a possibility.

However, if you are going to do spot and stalk, which is harder, but in my opinion more rewarding then the farther you can shoot the better.  You can expect shots greater than 40 and out to 60 or even 70 yards.  So, practice practice and practice some more.  While not successful, we hunted during the rut using a hand-held decoy and it was amazing that two men walking and holding this thing could fool an antelope.  We did get close and we had them come to us, but just not close enough to close the deal.

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Hunting them with a decoy

Hunting them with a decoy sounds like a blast. I have seen that method of bowhunting them many a time on various hunting shows. I have seen guys use everything from a doe pronghorn decoy to a cow decoy. Tred Barta's buddies used a 3D buck pronghorn decoy that they had cut they head off and rigged it up so that you could make it lower and raise its head to mimic the classic aggressive posturing behavior. I also saw a show where a bowhunter walked on the off side of his guide's horse and was able to get within bow range of a pretty good pronghorn buck. That was pretty much the wierdest method I have seen. I would be worried about the guy shooting my horse. Like CVC said, if you are not going to be using a ground blind over water than be ready for a long shot. The various decoy methods sound pretty cool though. And oh yeah, there is a hat that you can wear that looks like a pronghorn buck. Basically you are using yourself as a decoy. You just better make sure that some dumby does not mistake you for a pronghorn. He would be pretty disappointed when he got up to his "trophy"!

CVC
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I saw that show about the guy

I saw that show about the guy that leads a horse and has the hunter stay behind it.  It was an unusual hunting method to say the least, but it worked.  Similar, I've seen where they use cow decoys.  Since cattle graze out with the pronghorn the antelope are not spooked when they see a cow approaching. 

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