9 replies [Last post]
Offline
Moderator
Joined: 01/27/2002
Posts: 7914
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

May 2005 Feature Article:

The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

Please use this area to post comments or questions about this feature article.

Offline
Joined: 03/15/2005
Posts: 1
Re: The Art Of Stalking Whitetails
moderator wrote:
May 2005 Feature Article:

The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

Please use this area to post comments or questions about this feature article.

Offline
Joined: 08/27/2004
Posts: 1949
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

good review

Offline
Location: Dryden, Ontario
Joined: 08/18/2005
Posts: 27
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

Yep that is a Decent Overall Review. Thumbs up

Offline
Location: Dryden, Ontario
Joined: 08/18/2005
Posts: 27
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

The Author Left out the Inevitable for some Novice or even experienced hunters
"Buck Fever", My hunting partner had a bad case of what you could call " buck fever" last moose hunting season. I called in a Small Bull moose and HE was to shoot it long before it came within 60 yards of me, for personal safety.Since it was achery season, I wanted at least fifty but we opted for the extra 10yards(somtimes those yards make your escape). While i called in the bull and he came grunting everystep(like a pig), When he hit 45yards I knew there was a Problem. I glaced over to see my partner Hadn't even drawn His bow, He was too busy shaking and staring mezmerized by this mediochre bull. I stopped calling but the bull kept coming and this worried me since it was the rut and even though he wasn't a giant, he could have easily stomped me. Then The bull turned and ran Luckily enough With an arrow sticking from his ribs, Not exactly a clean, perfect shot BUt 150yards later we recovered him.
After we loaded the bull, and were driving the hour back to town he apologized and continued to say that has never happened before.

HE has hunted for 6years Archery and that was his first moose but he has taken Nice deer, Just goes to show that this can happen to anyone.

Offline
Joined: 08/27/2004
Posts: 1949
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

LOL YEP LOTS OF PEOPLE I KNOW HAVE GOT IT. i even heard of a guy that almost froze to death because of it he got lost somewhere hunting in ontario and couldnt find his way back

Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Joined: 10/26/2006
Posts: 357
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

Very good article, I've read about still hunting a few times and even tried it every once in awhile, definitely something I would like to try again on a more serious note....takes lots of good patience, an easy step and a good eye! Thumbs up

Offline
Moderator
Joined: 12/03/2005
Posts: 1572
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

All I need is a bunch of spruce bows to make a cushion and a tree for a backrest and I can sit all day as long as I'm warm enough. More laziness than anything else and a midday nap is almost a given Thumbs up

Offline
Location: Wandering the World, Currently at Ft. Campbell, KY
Joined: 10/05/2006
Posts: 205
The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

Very good article. Wish some of the other so called still hunters would read this. Had one "still" hunter chase a 6pt away from my stand. Brick Wall,) Tried still hunting a few times but no luck.

Offline
Location: Michigan
Joined: 01/12/2010
Posts: 4
Re: The Art Of Stalking Whitetails

Great article - still-hunting requires a commitment to it: it might not be successful if only tried sporadically. I made a conscious decision in my early twenties to be a still-hunter with the understanding that I would probably miss out on some deer while I learned to do it and made mistakes. I'm still learning. I spend time off-season in the woods backpacking and practice stepping quietly, I watch deer in a suburban woodlot behind my in-laws where they have little fear of humans to see how they look when hidden at multiple different angles and distances with and without binoculars (much like how the author uses game preserves) and I work out at a gym to maintain balance, leg strength and endurance. You end up squatting in place or on a knee in uncomfortable positions for extended periods of time. I took the scope off my rifle and practice shooting quickly and accurately off-hand at various distances (most of my hunting is in thick cover and swamps). Most of all I spend my time in-season applying the techniques with the heightened awareness that comes from actual hunting. It's a progression not unlike a rookie quarterback's: at first you'll throw a lot of interceptions and scare away deer but eventually the game slows down and you're able to read the woods like a zone defense and see the deer before they see you. You have to be willing to go home empty-handed a few times while you adapt, though, unless you're really good or just lucky. I couldn't imagine hunting any other way on a regular basis, though - for me it would be like trying to enjoy the funny pages after reading Hemingway. Rifle season is only two weeks long in Michigan and I'm lucky if I can get four or five days in the woods in-season (none the last two years, hope I haven't regressed too much), so I'll spend every second I can still-hunting when deer season returns. Another great resource - in addition to this article - for anyone interested in still-hunting is G. Fred Asbell's Stalking & Still-Hunting: The Gound Hunter's Bible.

Related Forum Threads You Might Like