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Topgun 30-06's picture
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Over quite a few years that I

Over quite a few years that I have hunted deer in the brush country of south Texas and a few years in the hill country, it has gotten to be more fun trying to shoot a big hog than a decent deer!  I don't know how many I've shot over the years down there, but the biggest was over 300# dressed and took a pulley attached to a tree and using our truck to raise up off the ground for skinning/quartering.  The best ones for eating are 125# and even a lot smaller than that.  If a person hasn't tried hunting them, they don't know what they are missing!  Their sense of smell is much keener than a deer, and their hearing is also very good, although their eyesight is pretty poor.

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Hopefully I'll get a chance locally!

 

Hopefully I'll get a chance to get one pretty locally!

NY DEC has officially confirmed that feral swine are breeding in Tioga, Cortland and Onondaga counties and is developing strategies for eradicating feral swine from New York.  Here's DEC'sFeral Swine (http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/70843.html) webpage.

 

 

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trophy hogs(?)

Hey Mike, I don't know how I've missed this post until now, but somehow I managed to. I guess I'd have to ask (reference your initial question) if every deer is considered a trophy? While the term "trophy" is somewhat ambiguous and every man (& woman) simply needs to determine what a trophy is to him/her, I see no reason why a big, free ranging wild hog would not be considered so. 

As already mentioned here, a big old boar has exceptional senses and on the brain scale they rank way above a deer, elk, moose or even your family dog. Take a minute and research just where hogs rank on the old brain meter. I'll just bet you'll be very surprised. A big old boar hog is way harder to hunt than a big old buck IMHO. I'd put my $$ on a 4 or 5 yr old boar before a 4 or 5 yr old buck (or bull) every day and twice on Sundays! 

As far as the hunting itself, put your self within 10' of a big pi$$sed off, wounded hog and then tell me it ain't a trophy. There's nothing in the wild a big old boar is afraid of, except a bigger boar, period. I killed a really big boar with my fifth shot and at less than 5 yards as he tried to get back up and chomp me and I can guarantee you, I'll call him a trophy animal to anyone who will listen.

As far as a mount, I was not interested, myself until I killed a really big one. Now, it's my favorite mount in my den and a da*n good conversation piece as well. I see no reason that a person who pays to hunt other game, such as elk, moose, bear, etc., wouldn't also pay to get the opportunity to kill a big old boar too. But that's my thinking.....

It's my firm opinion and I'd bet a pocketful of $$ that if you went one on one with a big old trophy boar you'd find it one he** of a hunt Mike. Zero doubt in my mind....zero. 

Below are two pictures of nice boars we've taken fair chase in Georgia. One is the one I finally killed at about 10 ft and the second is the big boar my Buddy took this past January. They both kinda look like trophies to my eyes..... 

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Couple of beauties there

Couple of beauties there TN!!!! Thumbs up

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The two pictures below look like trophy animals to me too!

Thanks for the reply Tndeerhunter – it is amazingly easy to miss threads that pop up later.  I don’t know how I manage it either but I do it too.

 

Yes, every deer is a trophy to me.  If I were hunting hogs I guess they would be too.  MY pig killing experience is limited to domestic pigs.  I am familiar with big hogs.  We had a seven hundred plus pound red boar that I used to sit on pony style when I was a kid!  But he was gentle.  That is nothing like a true wild animal and that is a big difference.

 

There is no doubt that pigs are smart.  They are also cleaner than many other animals, choosing a designated spot to leave their droppings and leaving the rest of the pen clean if they have the room to do so.  They never soil their bedding if they can help it.  Their dirty reputation comes from wallowing in mud as a relief from the heat since they can’t sweat.  They also dig up bulbs and other roots with their snouts which give them dirty faces but they are not dirty animals.  If you raise pigs and spend any time with them you may have to fight with yourself to keep eating pork as they are just as intelligent as the average dog. 

 

All that said, I’ll agree that the two pictures below look like trophy animals to me.  Nice boars!   

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big boar

A really big boar of 300-500 pounds will have a protective shield that must be seen to believe. I'd heard of a hog's (males only) protected shoulder, but only when we caped out my big boar did I fully understand the protection allotted from that heavy sheild of cartilage. I shot my big boar five times with a .44 mag carbine shooting 270gr SP loads (not HP).

The first shot hit the hog square in the neck, about 3" behind his right ear. The shot dropped him, but he was up immediately and popping his jaws bigtime. I shot and hit him a second time in the middle of his right shoulder. That dropped him again, but he struggled to get up again. I shot two more times at his exposed belly and he was quiet. Quiet, that is until I approched him and when I tossed a small stick at what appeared to be a big dead boar, he tried again to get up, again popping those cutters.

One final shot at 10' through the middle of his neck finally kept him down for good. The load was a 270gr Gold Dot .44 mag, giving about 1700 FPS from a carbine and about 1700 FPE at the muzzle. The shot to his neck was against his vertebra, but obviously did not break his neck. The shot to the middle of his shoulder was against his shoulder blade, barely making it through his thick sheild. This shot never even drew blood, not one drop! Only the found bullet and the hole through the sheild showed I had not missed. 

The two to his exposed belly took out one or both lungs, but he still struggled to get to me before shot #5. The two bullets below were pulled from the carcass when we caped him. They are numbered as they were fired. #1 was against his vertebra and #2 was against his large heavy shoulder bone. His formidable sheild was from no less than 2.5" thick to nearly 4" thick in places. Imagine a stout .44 mag load taken directly on the shoulder, not even bleeding. Huh?

 

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groovy mike's picture
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There is no doubt that they can be tough.

Pretty impressive Tndeerhunter! 

I have had a hand in butchering dozens of hogs.  Not only did we raise them for meat but my granddad sold piglets every spring and had anywhere from a dozen to several dozen swine on site at any given time.  So I have deconstructed them.  Most domestic hogs die the way that any game animal would.  A bullet between the eyes will put them down quickly and humanely.  Cutting a hog’s throat and waiting for them to bled out while on the hoof is a mistake not to be repeated.  The toughest hog I ever tried to kill was sow of about three hundred pounds.  I was using my grand dads 32-20 rifle.  It was a pump action and the rifle he used to take scores of deer over his hunting career.  I shot that sow behind the ear from about two feet from the muzzle.  She shook her head and walked off.  Walking up next to her I repeated the process on the other side with the exact same effect.  I then put a bullet into the side of her head between the eye and ear.  It knocked her down but she got up and trotted off.  At that I decided that the cartridge was inadequate and retrieved my AKM chambered in 7.62x39 and put a bullet between her eyes which knocked her down and kept her there but we still had a heck of a time getting through the hide, fat, and hair to cut her throat even when she was just twitching and not really struggling, fighting, or trying to get away.  There is no doubt that they can be tough.

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boars

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" But then the supermarket

" But then the supermarket isn't as much fun, which it is all about."

Critter nailed it I think.

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Feral pigs are some times a

Feral pigs are some times a trophy and some times a pest.  If is a pig that has destrosed fields and crop land then it is a pest.  But if i pay money to go on a pig hunt it is a trophy.  When it comes down to it i don't think feral is the right word.  Most pigs that get lose are really killed in the 1st year of being out.  The ones that are out long and get bigger and bigger are trophys in just the fact they served the odds.  So feral is really just a word for luck..

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