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hunter25's picture
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Any home blueing tips?

I have an old Remington 552 that due to stupidity and leaving it in the trunk of my car when I was a kid it got a lot of surface rust on it. I did get the rust off years ago and the gun workd fine but the barrell badly needs some blueing. I talked to a local gunsmith but he wants nearly $200 dollars just to blue the barrell and I just don't think it's woth that much.

Anybody tried or used one of the home kits with good results?

Critter's picture
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The home kits are a cold

The home kits are a cold bluing process and I have used them on occasion when something had to be done before shipping the firearm off to somebody that does the hot bluing.  It doesn't give you a dark blue like a factory rifle but more of a light transparent blue and the ones that I have done I was never satisfied with the results and ended up sending the firearms back to the factory to have a pro do it right. 

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Maybe try browning it

My only experience with cold blueing barrels is spot blueing of sections of barrels - with indifferent results.  The color never seems to match but since the areas blued were hidden be the stock that didn't much matter.

Have you considered trying to brown the barrel?  Back when my Dad & I first got into muzzleloading we bought kits for rifles.  The barrels required browning which we did ourselves.  It was a facinating process of heating the barrel (with a propane torch) and applying the stain.  Extreme care was needed to apply uniform heat and stain for equal coverage of the barrel.  The barrels hung to dry and cure for days , then the process repeated several times.  We got very nervous after the first application when the envire surface of the barrel grew a coating of rust but fine steel wool knocked it off and prepped the surface for the next application. 

The results were very satisfying.  Dad later did another Hawken & spent almost a month browning the barrel.  I can't remember how many applications he did but the results are spectacular.  The brown is so deep it's almost purple.  It kinda reminds me of an expensive custom paint job on a car - you know where they do many thin layers, sanding between layers.

At that time the materials weren't that expensive & you can most likely get them from Brownells or Midway.  It's time & labor intensive but not hard.  And, you'll end up with a unique .22; heck the barrel might end up looking so good you'll have to re-do the stock as well. 

 

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Just thinking and I haven't

Just thinking and I haven't checked it out but have you looked into having the barrel Parkerized?  It may be cheaper but then again it may not be. 

I also agree with the browsing of the barrel.  I did this once on a muzzle loader that I built back in the early 70's and came out great.  It just takes a lot of time.  Also if you want to try the hot bluing yourself I have a couple of recipes that you can try if you can get the chemicals to do it. 

hunter25's picture
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Thanks for the ideas guys.

Thanks for the ideas guys. I'm going to forget about the cold blue process as I do want this to come out well. I don't think parkerized woul look right this rifle as It was my grandfathers and I want it closer to the way it looked before. I am going to check out the browing process as it sounds very interesting. Other than that I think I will contact Remington also and see how much they would charge to fix it up. I've never sent anything back before so I didn't even think of it. The barrell comes right out so it would be very easy to send off to get done.

Thanks again for the suggestions.

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i've used birchwood-casey's

i've used birchwood-casey's perma-blue with mixed results. i did learn a little about the process and i figured out i could a deeper blue if i heated the solution. i did not want to microwave it, so i boiled water and stuck the bottle in the boiling water to heat it. thinking back to chemistry 125, most of the reactions we created in a chemical solution, we had to heat to get the most efficient results.

you could try heating the perma-blue and the barrel to around 100-120 degrees and you should come up with a better result. it still won't be as good as the factory blue either.

i third the motion for browning the firearm, it's difficult and time consuming but very pretty when you're finished.

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