8 replies [Last post]
groovy mike's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Joined: 03/19/2009
Posts: 2485
after the kill traditions?

After I have a deer down, I first give thanks then tag the deer.  But after the game is taken care of, I celebrate with a good cigar. I don't normally smoke so the rare occassions that I do, I really enjoy it.

Other guys I know put blood on their face or forehead to complete the harvest ritual.

What traditions or rituals do you guys do to celebrate taking game?

 

Ca_Vermonster's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: San Diego, CA
Joined: 07/27/2007
Posts: 5731
I say a little prayer of

I say a little prayer of thanks, then there really isn't much tradition until I actually butcher it.  I will make a phone call to my Dad if he's not there.

However, if he is there for the butchering, it's usually a family event.  I am de boning the deer, my Dad is cutting the steaks, and my Mom is doing the wrapping. 

And the whole time that is going on, there is a skillet on the stove, with some butter and onions, and some slices of prime tenderloin or backstrap going, so we can eat as we work.... Thumbs up

groovy mike's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Joined: 03/19/2009
Posts: 2485
nice family tradition

Ca_Vermonster wrote:

I say a little prayer of thanks, then there really isn't much tradition until I actually butcher it.  I will make a phone call to my Dad if he's not there.

However, if he is there for the butchering, it's usually a family event.  I am de boning the deer, my Dad is cutting the steaks, and my Mom is doing the wrapping. 

And the whole time that is going on, there is a skillet on the stove, with some butter and onions, and some slices of prime tenderloin or backstrap going, so we can eat as we work.... Thumbs up

 

CA_Vermonster

 

That reminds me of pig butchering when I was a kid.  The pigs were killed, singed or skinned and gutted by my dad and my grandfather.  Then they would be sawn lengthwise with a gig hand powder boning saw (usually with a man on each side).  Then the half a hog would be carried in to the kitchen or dining room table that had been covered with a half sheet of plywood.  Everyone would work at deboning.  All five of use kids would be working to take any piece of meat that remained on the bones after my mother and grandmother had removed the prime cuts.  My sisters would generally help wrap those big pieces meat in freezer paper but the small pieces would be collected in a bucket for sausage making.  My brother and I would run them through the hand grinder while my dad would mix and add the spices.  Ina  couple of hours there wouldn’t be anything left of a couple of big hogs that we had been fattening for a year and a half except a year’s worth of pork stacked in two families’ freezers to see us through until the next year of butchering.

 

Tndeerhunter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Tennessee
Joined: 04/13/2009
Posts: 1110
after the harvest

Great topic. I can't say how distasteful it is for me to watch a TV hunter jump around and slam an animals head into the ground in a jubilant "dance" after finding his game. Talk about an ego maniac! I am always in awe as I walk up to a new harvest and the first thing I do is (if needed) reposition the animal's body into an attractive, natural position, so I might enjoy the sight.

I always sit and think for a bit (hesitate to call it praying, sorry) and remind myself to treat my harvest with the respect it's due. I've been know to spend 20 full minutes cleaning off blood from an animal before even thinking about taking a photo of it. I always try to take pictures before the field dressing is done. Yes, I've had people laugh at me.....

I have also been known to feed an animal it's last meal, a European tradition, which I think a lot of. Perhaps some hunters might do well to study some of the fine European hunting traditions to see just how much respect they pay to their harvested animals. 

Several years back I'd also celebrate most all my harvests with a shot of "cough medicine" even at 8 AM. That habit has calmed some lately tho....lol lol

 

groovy mike's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Joined: 03/19/2009
Posts: 2485
last meal

I took part in that european tradition of the last meal for the game - I forget what it was called- when I hunted in Africa.  Namibia is an former German colony so they have a lot of those traditions handed down through the Boer ancestry.  I liked teh tardition.  Even though I don't do it at home I found it somehow appropriate to show some measure of respect to the animal and the universe in general as well as being thankful to my God who sends the game.

458express's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/02/2010
Posts: 18
After the Hunt - German

It is called Weidemanns Heil, roughly translated means Hunter's welfare. The little blade of grass or twig in the animal that were killed's mouth. (Namibia and German tradition)

I am from South Africa and what I do is firstly take my hat/cap off, thank God for the life He has given me and the opportunity to hunt. Then I stroke or pat the animal and say sorry I took its life and say thank you for offering me the challenge.

In our "Boer" tradition if it is your first animal you killed your face is smeared with blood and you have to eat a piece of the liver raw sometimes to welcome you to manhood you have to eat the "pears" (if it is a male animal).

As a professional hunter I make sure while I am setting the trophy up for photos I go through my ritual (saying thank you) and stroking the animal. In the case of a lion I stroke the mane and I tap the nose.

 

 

groovy mike's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Joined: 03/19/2009
Posts: 2485
Weidemanns Heil

458express wrote:

It is called Weidemanns Heil, roughly translated means Hunter's welfare. The little blade of grass or twig in the animal that were killed's mouth. (Namibia and German tradition)

 

Thank you for refreshing my memory with the name

buffybr's picture
Offline
Location: Montana, USA
Joined: 11/15/2007
Posts: 310
After the shot

Tndeerhunter wrote:

Great topic. I can't say how distasteful it is for me to watch a TV hunter jump around and slam an animals head into the ground in a jubilant "dance" after finding his game. Talk about an ego maniac! 

I agree with you here 100%.  I can't stand all that yelling, screaming, high fives, and "man hugs" that are shown on TV.  How about a little respect for the animal?  OK, if I'm hunting with a guide, which is very rare, I'll shake his hand and thank him for helping me get the animal.

Then, it's cut my tag and tape it to an antler or leg.  After that, if I have a camera with me, I'll clean up and position the animal for a picture.   Then I start gutting the animal.  When the gutting is completed I'll go about getting him back to camp.  Most of the time, I hunt by myself so it's up to me to get him back to camp, but occasionally I'll have a hunting partner to help with the dragging, and if I'm real lucky, I'll be able to drive a vehicle to him. 

I don't really do much celebrating until the animal is back at camp.  Then I'll kick off my boots and sit back with an ice cold Coors Light. 

Tndeerhunter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Tennessee
Joined: 04/13/2009
Posts: 1110
very well said

That Sir, was very well said! Nothing I can possibly add. Thanks.  Applause

Related Forum Threads You Might Like

ThreadThread StarterRepliesLast Updated
Traditions Yukon Inline ML!Kirrmeister505/20/2009 21:52 pm
Favorite Muzzleloading Company?Pa.50cal1911/07/2005 01:28 am
Traditions Yukonprhunter505/11/2010 07:07 am
Traditions Yukonprhunter007/18/2009 12:49 pm
BP pellets in a sidelock!? It works!!!Kirrmeister305/16/2009 13:49 pm