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7mm Rem Mag

Capt O

There are many a Roosevelt brought down every year with a bow. It's just that I have yet to try it.

When I set up my 30 cal's for hunting. I load only one bullet for each rifle. Hence, 30-30 wcf -150 gr Speer flat nose hot core, 308 win-150 gr Hornady Interbond, 30-06 220 gr Nosler semi spitzer Partition, 300 wsm 180 gr Nosler Accubond. These are my primary loads. I do have others.

I could probably figure it out but, I'm not real familiar with the bullet performance in 7mm or what weights are recommended for hunting.
If I were a 7mm shooter. Say 7-30 waters, 7-08 rem, 280 rem, 7 rem mag. What would be a good bullet choice for each cartridge.

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7mm Rem Mag

You definitely know your way around with those .30's. There is such a huge array of different bullet weights and styles. The 7mm's are nearly as versatile. With the 7mm clan, I would expect that for general purpose hunting, the 140 grain bullet would be a good choice. It expands very fast, much like a typical 130 grain .277 cal. bullet or a 150 grain .30. It's excellent for deer and antelope. A 150 grain 7mm bullet is also good for deer and antelope, but is equally effective on black bear, bighorn sheep, and wild boar. Even the smaller-cased 7mm-08 should be able to achieve 2800+ fps MV with a 150 grain bullet. The 160 grain class is excellent for larger-than-deer game, such as elk and moose, and it is here and with the long 175 grain bullet that the 7mm Magnum becomes most useful, because it handles these heavier-for-caliber bullet weights more efficiently than the smaller 7mm cartridges.

There are also 100 grain, 110, 115, 120 grain, etc, wich would work fine for varmint hunting in the smaller 7mm's, but the 7mm Remington Magnum and kin burn far too much powder to be considered reasonable varmint rounds.

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7mm Rem Mag

I am much more impressed with the 7 rem mag than the 300 win mag. Mostly from a reloading view but, also from a performance standpoint. If the 30-338 win mag or the 308 norma mag were more available than they are. I would take a different view because of their capability to throw 200gr pointed spitzers efficiently.
Being a 30 cal shooter. The 300 wsm, with 180 gr bullets, gives me the perfomance I'm looking for in a cartridge that produces more energy and a bit flatter trajectory than a 30-06 and comparable to the 7 rem mag with 160 gr bullets of the same type and manufacture. The draw back being bullets larger than 180 gr have little advantage because of the powder capacity restriction but, the 180 gr at extended range, is sufficient for any game in these lower 48. A step up would probably be better suited to a larger caliber.
Remington had a very good idea when they necked the 264 win mag to .284. The 264 wm is every bit a performer as the 7 rm but there we have it again. The heavier bullets of the 7 rm are better suited to the larger game. As, the 30-338 win mag would be better suited to heavier bullets.
Cases of larger capacity than the 7 rem mag and the 300 win mag have been welcomed into the hunting field but, from a reloading view, the improvements are minimal for the amount of extra powder used.
This being said, on the average, it takes approximately 4 more grains of powder in the 300 wsm with 180 gr bullets to produce the same performance as a 7 rem mag with the comparable 160 gr bullet, BC being almost identical. The SD a bit better on the 7 mm version. This is an average. There are some that require more than 4 grs and some that require a lesser powder charge but, of the most popular powders. The average is 4 grs.
The 7 rem mag is well suited to hunting the lower 48.
If a hunter wanted a long rifle for open country hunts and a short rifle for heavy timber and the occasional open country hunts, that perfomed almost indentically. He might choose a 7 rem mag with a 3x-9x 40 and a 300 wsm with a 1x-4x 32.

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7mm Rem Mag

I agree. The 300 Winchester Magnum is a good round in that as far as the big .30 magnums go it has less recoil and more finesse than say a 300 RUM. It really works best with bullets in the 165 to 200 grain range. With 150's despite the high velocity, it's actually less efficient than a 30-06. With a 180 grain bullet, it tops out at about 3130 fps MV.

The 7mm Remington Magnum gives the same overall performance with even less recoil. The 7mm STW and 7 Ultra Mag are in my opinion awfully big cases to be using bullets in this caliber-class. With the proper dose of H-1000 or H-4831 powder the 7mm Remington Magnum achieves basically the same ballistics. A 160 grain bullet departing the muzzle at 3100+ fps retains more energy at 300 yards than many other popular rounds pack at the muzzle.

You've definitely got it pegged with matching equipment to the conditions. Some wily bucks don't like to show themselves in the open in daylight. Around here, they tend to come out into the pastures to feed about an hour or two before first light. By the time it's light enough to see or make a shot, they're back in the cover.

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7mm Rem Mag

This next statement is in reference, only, to what I have discovered from shooting many different cartridges. The end result is always the same. The bullet goes where you want it to.
In my itty bitty bit of experience. The key to using any firearm is knowing that particular firearms capabilities. The rest is practice.
It's easy. Don't use a firearm beyond or below it's capability and if set up properly. There is no guessing.
This method makes it possible to become proficient with any firearm.

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7mm Rem Mag

That's true.

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Re: 7mm Rem Mag

I HAVE NEVER HEARD A 7 MAG OWNER SAY ANYTHING NEGATIVE
ABOUT HIS RIFLE!

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Re: 7mm Rem Mag
madmax wrote:
I HAVE NEVER HEARD A 7 MAG OWNER SAY ANYTHING NEGATIVE
ABOUT HIS RIFLE!

Let's see. I shot a deer with my 7mm one evening just about dark while he was standing next to a fence. After the shot he jumped the fence and ran off. I was about to bend the rifle and scope around the nearest tree. Then my hunting partner told me that the deer had been hit. I didn't believe him but went over to where he was standing to look for some blood but I didn't find any. Then just on a whim I tracked him from where he went over the fence for about 50 yards where I found him where he had ran into a tree. He didn't leave a drop of blood until he hit that tree then there was a pool of it around him. The funny thing is that it happened to me again about 4 years later. Both deer just didn't know that they were dead when I hit them.

That is about the worse that I can say about that 7mm.

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Re: 7mm Rem Mag

Boy this is an old thread. Realised it when I saw Captain_Obvious name. Haven't heard anything from him in a long time. Anyway I know what you mean Critter. I've seen the same thing happen with 300 Win Mag on deer occasionally. It happens sometimes. That's why I always caution people against believeing in that theoretical magical thing called one-shot-stops. It's not an absolute with any caliber or cartridge. I've been hunting long enough to know that no living creature will always be stopped with only one shot all the time. That discussion always comes up about one-shot-stop handgun calibers and I always use the "rifle on biggame" example to debunk those handgun theories.

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Re: 7mm Rem Mag

I realized that my main problem was too much speed from the rifle on too close of shots. I have always tried to figure out what the bullet did after the animal is down and what I can do to improve it. I have shot elk with a 150 gr bullet out of a 7mm that went clear through them at 200 yards and others that the bullet came to rest on the off side just under the hide. You can never really figure them out. Now that I mostly hunt with a handgun I usually don't have that kind of problem. There is something to be said about a heavy bullet moving fairly slow compared to a rifle round when it hits an animal.