9 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined: 12/03/2003
Posts: 16
the 7mm ah what can i say?

I have seen alot of bears killed before and have had alot of hands on experience with a wounded bear. I have been along only as an observer how ever i have learned alot from my bear hunting family. My auncle shot his first bear with a 444. I once saw a sleeping brownie get shot in the back between the shoulders and he never stood up. I have also seen a .378 weatherby hit its mark and not put the bear down for good. Now to the point a 7mm will kill a bear just as a 223 kills black bear every year.But the catch is you have to make a good shot and use the right bullets. It is only good out to 150 yards -does any one out there agree with me-and yes i know there are better magnum cartridges for bear hunting but the 7mm is my pet.

Offline
Location: Missouri/Arkansas
Joined: 08/21/2003
Posts: 891
the 7mm ah what can i say?

It really depends on your bullet choice. There are a couple of rounds that will work on brown bear from a 7mm Remington Magnum out to 300 yards, maybe a bit more if you boost their energy through handloading, i.e. better powder, especially IMR7828 or H-1000. The three factory rounds are: the 160 grain Federal Nosler Partition, the 162 grain Hornady, and the 165 grain Federal BTSP. All of these provide deep penetration, sufficient to kill a brown bear, out to 300 yards. Handloaded to reach 3100 fps+, the 160 grain class missiles extend that range somewhat. These bullets are designed specifically to penetrate heavy bone and muscle at long range. Of course, there are also the 175 grain bullets, which perform much the same way, basically, with these bullet selections, this caliber's performance treads right on the heels of the 300 Winchester Magnum, and is considered on of the world's finest all-around big game cartridges.

Offline
Location: Missouri
Joined: 02/14/2004
Posts: 62
the 7mm ah what can i say?

I guess it depends on a bodys definition of good. I hit a good black bear just behind the shoulder but a couple inches high. I seen him bite at the spot. He rolled over in the ditch. When I got there he was gone. It wasn't a ditch. It was straight down. I had the 270 as hot as I could load it and not stick in the chamber. I used good 120 gr bullets and the bear was 89 steps down the old trail. The bullet never passed through the bear so there was no blood. Just clumps of hair. We looked till dark and went back the next morning and combed the hill side for a square mile. We never found the bear. We shot another bear "350 lbs" at 20 steps with a 30-06 180 gr core lok. The bear never even shook. It turned and headed off the bank and we shot again in the oposite shoulder. Neither shot went through the bear. The first shot broke the shoulder the second hit the heart. It stuck it's nose in the dirt and then rolled over. The last bear we shot was a smaller bear with a 300 win mag at 29 steps and it had a exit hole with lots of blood. The bear never went 15 yrds before it fell over. In the country where we hunt it's steep and heavy cover. I personally don't want the bear to travel any distance after hit. I want him to fall in his tracks. I have went to a 338 with expanding bullets and a 300 weatherby 180 gr flat base bullets for distance and accuracy. I guess it's not neccessarily the caliber or round but it's what's best for my rifles. The 338 is not accurate enough to suit me out at 300 yds and the 300 weatherby is. There are clear cuts in NW Montana where we hunt. This is a fair chase state with no baiting or hounds. Taking a bear out of a tree or over bait would be a different story all together.

This is all my opinion for what it's worth

Offline
Location: Missouri/Arkansas
Joined: 08/21/2003
Posts: 891
the 7mm ah what can i say?

You should have used 140-grain bullets in that 270. Better penetration and more damage. People with these new ultra-high velocity rounds, like these WSMs and kin, they think just because they shoot flat that this automatically makes them accurate and capable of 400 and 500 yard shooting. It's been my experience that a lot of those guys see a 200-yard shot, and think it's 400 yards, not to mention most of them are prone to flinching.

Offline
Location: Anchorage AK
Joined: 12/03/2004
Posts: 46
the 7mm ah what can i say?
Ferguson wrote:
I guess it depends on a bodys definition of good. I used good 120 gr bullets and the bear was 89 steps down the old trail.

.270 with a 120 grain bullet is light for big animals like bears that you want to anchor. The reason the 338 and the 300 win mag work so well for people is not just speed, but bullet weight.

The heavier bullets will tend to have thicker jackets and penetrate better. I would have used a 150 grain Speer GS or Nosler partition in the 270. Not as fast as a 120, but that extra weight translates to better penetration and if you want through and through, you need the weight to ensure it.

Offline
Joined: 08/27/2004
Posts: 1964
the 7mm ah what can i say?

best moose guns and big game guns .30 - 06 Springfield. But use only the very best premium quality 180 - grain bullets and a careful shot selection.
.35 Whelen is an excellent moose gun,.35 Whelen and handloaded 225 - grain Barnes X - Bullet.
The Federal Premium with the 225 - grain Trophy Bonded bullet is the best .35 Whelen factory load choice. The only other factory load to consider is the Remington 250 - grain; avoid their 200 - grain loading at all costs. The lighter bullet is too soft for this cartridge, and while it works on whitetails, it will not reliably penetrate moose.
The 7mm magnums, Remington or Weatherby, are the minimum, and again with good, high - quality 175 - grain bullets. The 7mm STW adds a bit more velocity and energy to the bullet. Right now the only factory load I would consider is the Winchester 160 - grain Fail Safe.
The .300 Wthby Mag., .300 Rem. Ultra Mag. and .30 - 378 Weatherby Mag. are all excellent moose guns, but they really need 200 - grain
or try .375 H&H Mag.The Federal 300 - grain Nosler Partition or Trophy Bonded loads are among the best factory or Speer Nitrex load with a 285 - grain Grand Slam bullet..416 or larger cartridges will smack a bull more than hard enough, but they really are more gun than you need.

Offline
Joined: 08/27/2004
Posts: 1964
the 7mm ah what can i say?

A 7mm Ultra Mag. load pushing a 160-grain Nosler Partition placates those of us who consider the overbore 7 shortchanged with 140-grain factory fodder. A 180-grain Swift Scirocco in the .300 Winchester Magnum is likewise a sensible move. This year, the Model 700 Classic comes in .221 Fireball, so Remington again makes the ammo (a 50-grain V-Max at nearly 3,000 fps).

Offline
Location: south barre, vt
Joined: 03/09/2006
Posts: 14
the 7mm ah what can i say

Thumbs up try a 175 grain federal fufion in that 7mmmag. i just found em, and my rifle likes em. htey are supposed to work really well. any real exoerience with how well they actually perform and holdup?

Don Fischer's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3177
the 7mm ah what can i say?

I can't pass this up.

Quote:
There are a couple of rounds that will work on brown bear from a 7mm Remington Magnum out to 300 yards, maybe a bit more if you boost their energy through handloading

The good thing about shooting Brown Bears at 300+ yards is that if you only wound them, they'll have plenty of time to get away befor you get to where you wounded it. That just may save your life! Then again someone else may come stubbling by and loose their's to one really upset bear!

Offline
Location: south barre, vt
Joined: 03/09/2006
Posts: 14
ahh the 7mm what can i say

Mr. Cool! you may want to try 220 grain cartridges in a 30-06. they can be harder to find, ( i buy a couple of boxes when thwey are on the shelf at the place i trade with) but i usually keep a couple boxes in my ammo box, for bear hunting activity. ive never shot a bear, if i do i want to damage it good and permanently. they have performed well in 06s ive had in the past(shooting wise). i wouldnt shot at bear more than 200 yards off. too much variable. try for a close shot. get through the boiler room, thats the best "bad medicine" there is for bear.ive heard some guys say to shoot them in the spine, just above the rump, to put em down, then get up close to finish it off. it sounds hocky to me. i helped track a bear in vt years ago that was neck shot by a hunter in the same woods i was in. it went a long ways ( a m ile +-) it bled alot, it went straight up hill, through the thickets *&^% it couild find. they never found it. i found the gut pile later that evening (at dark) apparently someone else found it. we never heard another shot, so it died from that one shot, it was a 270. check out the 175 fusion for that 7mm. i think its a good bullet