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7mm-08 for elk?

I am having trouble justifying the purchase of a 300wsm for this coming elk season.  I have a 7mm-08 but wanted to get something larger for elk.  Will the 7mm-08 with the proper bullet do the job?  I would imagine I would have to take shots closer than 300 yards and probably closer to 200 yards with proper shot placement.

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The 7mm-08 is a fine rifle

The 7mm-08 is a fine rifle round for elk.  You can purchase either a 140 or 150 grain premium bullets for it and be set for the hunt.  I have seen quite a few hunters use it for both deer and elk and as you said if you keep the range within reason there should be no problem. 

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My thoughts on the 7mm-08 and elk

First let me say that I have never been elk hunting let alone shot one.  But, I understand external and terminal ballistics.  And seeing how I own a 7mm-08 and shoot it often at long range, I understand this chambering quite well.  In my opinion, it is a very good round for elk.  Use the right bullet (something that has excellent controlled expansion) and I would say that a 350yd and in shot is quite doable and ethical.  In my opinion it all boils down to penetrating the tougher bone mass of such a big animal.

I shoot the 150gr SBT in my 7/08 and would not have any quams about sending one into a muley at 500 and under.  That being said, when I do my elk hunt one day, I will more than likely reload my ammo with a more controlled expanding bullet such as the accubonds ot the barnes triple shock.  And of course, keep my shots at the 350yd max distance.

On another site, there was quite a long flaming thread about the 7/08 being used on elk.  Of course, the magnum crowds had their flame throwers pointed at the advocates of the non magnum crowds.  Then a Montana guide came chimed in with his experience with elk and the 7/08.  It was a thread changing post.  He informed all of us that he has on several occasions, taken youths out on elk hunts and his number one caliber for them is the 7/08.  He stated that he was watching elk drop with this caliber from distances of 100yd out to 350 and on a couple of occasions 400yds.  The low recoil of the 7/08 gave the youngsters quite a bit more confidence in shooting the rifle (just ask the steel sillouette shooters why the have a love affair with the 7/08).

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close enough to what I used on my first

I killed my first elk with a .280, you're only 100 fps behind that with a 7mm-08.  Just use a good bullet.  And you've got lots of choices in factory loads.  Or you can steal your girlfriend's .270.

In terms of cheap factory loads, I'd avoid the Remington 140 Core-Lokt 140 Power Point and 140 Balllistic Silvertip, but would consider the Federal 150 grain loaded with the Speer Hot Core.  

For the premiums, your best selection is from Federal in 140 grain weights: Barnes TSX, Trophy Bonded and or Nosler Partition.  Avoid the 140 grain Ballistic Tip.

Also, I'd avoid those new bonded types from Federal and Winchester.  They are cheap electrochemically plated bonds designed for deer hunting.  Those bullets open wide but don't penetrate really well.  If you're tempted by a cheap bullet, go for the 150 grain Speer Hot Core loaded by federal.  Midway has them in stock for $26.99:

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=179810

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I would rather pay for a high

I would rather pay for a high end bullet that will work than skimp on ammo.  After all the bullet is the final connection between you and the animal. 

I figure having 2 rifles will be better.  We could back up each other in case of a miss or have one as a backup incase one malfuntions or dropped and scope breaks.  Always better to be safe than sorry.

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7mm-08 is a fine round for

7mm-08 is a fine round for elk.  Use a 140gr. accubond and you should be fine.  shots out to 300 yards shouldn't stop you.  just practice! good luck and hope to see pictures 

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Like the rest here I think

Like the rest here I think the 7mm-08 is an OK round for elk.  The one thing I would do which I am sure you already now...is preactice practice practice.....while the caliber is not the 300 a well placed bukllet will put a cow or bull down with no problems.

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It's plenty of bullet. I've

It's plenty of bullet. I've killed elk with a 30-30. Shot placement is more important than the bullet. (within reason)

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will cause argument

I was in favor of it on a previous lengthy and warm discussion a few months ago.  A few members here were strongly opposed to my opinion.  Who cares?  I know what my experiences have taught me in the field.  I think it's a grood cartridge.  I however use a .270 Win for elk these days, in factt for all my biggame hunts, deer, pronghorn, etc.  I'm just surprised to see so many now in favor of the 7mm-08 for elk.Whistling

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If you handload the 7mm-08 it

If you handload the 7mm-08 it can be very effective. Check this out.

 

http://sed88.tripod.com/rem7/compare.html

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Hand Loading

Still Hunter wrote:

If you handload the 7mm-08 it can be very effective. Check this out.

 

http://sed88.tripod.com/rem7/compare.html

If you hand load you can tailor make a load that your rifle will love, it doesn't matter if it is a 7mm-08 or a 300 magnum.  It is hard to compare a tailor made hand load with a factory offering no matter what the caliber.  In his little article he says " I can shoot up 3 boxes at the range with no blue shoulder. At 100 yards I can shoot the teeth off a plastic fork one at a time. I can't do this with my 7 mag. I use the 7mm-08 year around shooting varmints, pronghorns, deer, elk, and anything in season. This has made me a better shooter and hunter."  Well, I can do the same thing with a 340 Weatherby or my 7mm mag with reduced loads.  The nice thing about the magnum cartridges is that you don't need to shoot magnum rounds in them.  For target practice you can reduce the power in the loads to where you can practice a lot more and then when it comes to hunting you can put in that full power load for that extra range and knock down when you need it.  I have only seen a couple of hunters that fire more than a couple of rounds to get their animal and as far as accuracy you are talking about a target the size of a basket ball.  That is unless you are hunting parrie dogs or ground squirls but then you don't need all that power. 

Now don't get me wrong the 7mm-08 is a good round and if I had one I would use it but you really can't compare it with the magnums since it will run out of horsepower just when the magnums are starting to shine.