8 replies [Last post]
Joined: 03/25/2004
Posts: 1
30.06 loads

I am relatively new to reloading and my grandfather loaded me some 30.06 rounds on my last visit to Idaho using 165 gr hornady sst bullets my concern lies in the fact that he used 58 grains of 4831 powder and I have been told that he over loaded by 3 grains and I don’t want to have my brand new rifle blow up the first time I shoot it so if anyone could give me feed back on whether he used to much powder or not it would be deeply appreciated

Offline
Location: New Brunswick
Joined: 03/25/2004
Posts: 16
30.06 loads

I am very new to reloading as well so i will tell you what everyone has told me. Get yourself a very good reloading manual and do not exceed their max load numbers. In your case with your grandfather loading them up for you i would tear them down and do it yourself it's not worth gettin hurt over a few handloads

Offline
Moderator
Location: Nova Scotia
Joined: 08/17/2002
Posts: 1762
30.06 loads

Your grandfathers loads may be perfectly fine... for HIS rifle. A max load in one rifle is totally different than another rifle. All rifles are unique and as such react to pressures different. I would never use somebody else's handloads in my rifle without first starting from the low charge level and working up slowly while checking for signs of pressure such as bulged primers and stuck casings to name just two. BE CAREFUL with other peoples handloads... you don't want to ruin your rifle but most important you don't want to die!!!!

bitmasher's picture
Offline
Moderator
Location: Colorado
Joined: 02/27/2002
Posts: 2973
30.06 loads

Chester has good advice for you. I would not use those overloads in your rifle. Instead, most manuals will offer a starting load that is safe for nearly any rifle, then you can start working up from there, grain by grain.

Good Luck!

Offline
Location: Wisconsin
Joined: 12/08/2003
Posts: 134
30.06 loads

You can never be too safe. If there is even a question of the load, then do NOT use it.

Offline
Location: Missouri/Arkansas
Joined: 08/21/2003
Posts: 891
30.06 loads

Some perfectly safe loads for the 30-06 (PLEASE understand that ''safe'' must be taken with a grain of salt, since things can and sometimes do go wrong), can drive a 150 grain bullet at 3100 fps and a 165 grain bullet at 3000 fps. Not every rifle will turn up this velocity, but these are achievable. Of course, I'd recommend a strong foundation of experience before attempting such loads.

Offline
Moderator
Location: Wa.
Joined: 03/31/2004
Posts: 1300
30.06 loads

After some research in the trusty manuals. 58gr. of 4831, assuming it's IMR powder, is very close to the average maximum charge. You've been given some good advice in this forum. It's better to work up to this level of charge. There is a possibility that your rifle could not handle it. If you drop back a few grains and work your way up, you may be able to exceed this charge. When asking for advice on loads, always be specific about all of the components that make up the round. The manufacturer of the case and the type of primer may or may not be critical. Charges set in military brass need to be reduced sometime as much as 3grs and could still show severe pressure signs. In some instances if a magnum primer is used in a load the powder needs to reduce to prevent excessive pressure. My advice is to tear the loads down get at least 2 manuals, 3 would be better, 4 and so on... Try to purchase manuals from the bullet manufacturers you plan on loading. Hornady bullets-Hornady manual and at least one other.
Good will on your loads.

Val
Offline
Location: Torrance, CA
Joined: 09/23/2004
Posts: 6
Reloads

The reloads that you were given may not even give you a tight group in your rifle. What gives a good group in one rifle may shoot terribly in another rifle.

I too recommend that you don't try these loads in your rifle unless you stand well away and pull the trigger with some sort of fishing line or chord. This way you only risk the rifle and not your health or the health of others.

If your going to want to use reloads you need to develop them by starting at a low powder charge weight and build up until you get a good group, always looking for signs of overpressure.

Offline
Location: Colorado
Joined: 03/28/2007
Posts: 44
Grandad/s '06 loads

In your initial question, you said your Grandad loaded the cartidges up with 4831 powder. Please, follow the advice given to you in this forum. Maximum loads WILL Vary greatly from rifle to rifle. Even more important for you to realize is that H4831 and IMR 4831 ARE TWO REALLY DIFFERENT POWDERS. Just because they are both called 4831 doesn't mean that you can substitute one for the other! In fact, I had a real good friend nearly ruin his new 7mm Weatherby mag and it was for this very reason. He thought that 4831 was the same from both manufactures. Thus, he reloaded a few boxes up with the max H4831 load data from his Speer Manual. Only trouble was, he was using Nosler bullets, IMR 4831 (compare max loads of these two powders in the manuals.), with Federal magnum primers. Funny thing, right off the bat, he started getting split cases. ALWAYS, start working your own loads up from the lower end. (NEVER, go below the minimums either. In some cases, It can be just as dangerous as going too high.) I don't understand all the physics involved, but often, a powder charge that is too small can create an overpressure situation. READ, READ, READ. The more manuals and articles you read, the better off you will be.

Related Forum Threads You Might Like

ThreadThread StarterRepliesLast Updated
.50 Cal Loadsprhunter401/22/2010 22:27 pm
Looking for 375 H&H Loadsseaniffd601/17/2008 14:18 pm
Savage 111 TH XP .300 win mag for kid ?gatortag505/29/2013 10:34 am
A Gummy FamilyTndeerhunter412/16/2010 18:33 pm
.243 65 gr V-Max- loads??Widux2303/31/2008 16:58 pm