15 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined: 01/05/2013
Posts: 92
300 gr. Woodleigh?

300 gr. Woodleigh Weldcore out of a 338 Win Mag (Winchester M70)?  My first rifle. My moose/bear gun.  Should I sight this thing in for 150 yards or closer? Does anyone have any experience with the 300 gr. Weldcore?  I could go with a spizter type bullet, but I don't plan to take shots at an animal past 300 yards.
The scope I have is a Leupold VX6 2-12, It comes with the CDS. The guy from Leupold said that the dial is in 50 yard increments. So would I just order the dial starting with 50 yards or set it out further starting with what I plan on zeroing it out at?

hunter25's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: Colorado western slope
Joined: 11/13/2009
Posts: 3023
Not sure about the bullets as

Not sure about the bullets as I've never used those and thier a bit pricey.

As far as the dial goes I would order it starting at your decided on zero range. It has a stop built in to return to zero so cannot go lower than original setting. You don't even have to look really if turning it back down in a hurry after an expected long shot.

Mine is 25 yard increments btw. Might depend on caliber though.

possum's picture
Offline
Location: SK Canada
Joined: 03/31/2009
Posts: 219
300 GR Woodleigh ??

I have never fired  300 GR bullet of any kind out of my 338WIN. For moose i usually use a 250 Speer Grand Slam , a 160 Barnes TTSX or a Nosler 180 Bal Tip depending on what season (draw or regular)  The last cow i shot was with a 338DIA, 180GR Nosler Ballistic Tip @3243 FPS which they claim is not a moose bullet. Shot placement is KEY..... I have'nt found  many animals in canada that can take a 180GR bullet to the neck and walk away. I like all of my energy/shock dissapating in the animal and its a done deal right there, NO TRACKING. Like running head long into a brick wall at full tilt.

 If you reload and you want particulars on my loads let me know, i will give you all of the info.

Critter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 4172
There is really no reason to

There is really no reason to shoot a bullet above 250 grains out of a .338 unless you find a location that it is legal to use it on one of the big five in Africa. I shoot a 225 grain Barnes TSX bullet out of my .340 Weatherby and find it capable on any North American big game animal out past 600 yards.

A question for you is why did you purchase a Leupold VX6 2-12 if you only plan on shooting out to 300 yards? Also for sighting in your rifle just have it zeroed at 200 yards with any ammo that you shoot out of it. That way it will only be a few inches high or low from 25 yards out to 300 yards without having to turn any dials on the scope.

Offline
Joined: 01/05/2013
Posts: 92
well....

Let me rephrase that.  I don't plan on taking shots with a soft round nose bullet past 300 - 350 yards.  Anything beyond that I'm going with spitzer type bullet like the TSX that you use.  Besides.  From most of what I read on the web, hunters don't seem to find a need to take shots past that.  Heck, isn't most game taken within 200 yards anyway? 

I'm undeniably ignorant of every aspect of hunting.  So.  Because I don't have any real world experience I have to rely on the input of the guys that do.  I have to read alot of input!  I spend hours upon hours gleaning from sound advise and the retarded opinions of others to gain any sort of basic understanding of hunting.  But man do I still have a ton of questions.  Even after all that reading.  So I depend on this site a bunch to steer me in the right direction.

If a larger percentage of shots are taken within, lets say, 500 yards.  A bullet like the Weldcore would be good right?  And don't most guides like clients to use a 375 to go brown bear hunting?  That caliber takes a hefty bullet.  My thinking is why not use a heavy bullet in my 338.   If I can stay accurate.   I've only shot a 225 gr. out of it and it wasn't too bad at all.  So I bought a box of 250 gr. that I'll shoot this weekend.  If I can manage those,  I'll try the 300 gr. bullets.  For fun if anything else.

   

 

Critter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 4172
I personally believe that if

I personally believe that if a guide ask his client to use a 375 H&H on a brown bear it is because a lot of clients can not shoot that well and the guide figures that the bigger gun the better.  Which isn't bad when you are dealing with a animal that can eat you. When I was looking at a brown bear hunt and talked to a few outfitters just about all of them recommended a rifle that I could shoot and shoot accurately from a 7mm magnum up. I have a friend that used a .270 on a grizzly hunt for a one shot kill.

Loadings for the 300 grain bullet are going to be in the 2450 fps range according to their tables and if I am reading it right the suggest a impact velocity of 1800-2500 fps which will handy cap you right off of the bat since a 300 grain round nose bullet will loose velocity fast after it leaves the barrel and I wouldn't even think of taking a 400 yard shot with one much less a 500 yard shot.

If I was you I would stick with bullets in the 200-250 grain range. Barnes TSX and the Nosler Partition are two bullets that fit into this range and are great bullets. You can use a 200 yard zero with them and be quite accurate out to 500 yards without having to fidget with the scope.

Offline
Joined: 01/05/2013
Posts: 92
REALLY!!!

That's interesting your friend can use a 270 for brown bear!  I've read of others who have done the same.  That's gotta be a really good feeling after you take a shot like that.  Especially with a 270. 

To me the bullet of even a 338 win mag looks small considering how big moose and brown bear can get.  And I've read many people say that they don't feel undergunned even with something in the 40 calibers.  So I guess I just thought that it couldn't be a bad choice going with a heavy weight.  I know I don't intend on going any lower than a 250 gr.  But then there are those who shoot the Barnes bullets and confirm you can shoot a lighter bullet with the same results.  If not better. 

So what's the typical range of shots when hunting moose and brown bear?

Is there any reason to justify using 300 gr. Weldcore?  For some reason I just like idea of using a round nose bullet.  Don't know why.  Heck the Partition even looks better ballistically on paper.  Faster, shoots flatter, and punches harder.   Alot of bullets look better on paper for that matter.

I'm just surprised at all the contradictions there are in choosing bullets.  Some say go heavy.  Some say no need to, just go light.  Some people (like the ones taking big bears with one shot with a 270) are proving to some that you don't need to have big bullets for big animals.  Some people prove you do. 

Critter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 4172
The idea of big and slow has

The idea of big and slow has a lot of merit in firearms, however if you buy a modern firearm chambered in a modern caliber such as the .338 Winchester then why not take full advantage of faster and smaller?  The old 45-70 has taken a lot of bears and moose with a 400 grain bullet going real slow but then the shots taken with is shouldn't exceed 150 yards.  If you look at the trajectory of a large bullet vrs a lighter one you will see what I mean.  The lighter bullets pack more than enough punch to go completely through a brown bear at longer range and doing a lot of destruction as they do it, where a larger bullet will do it at shorter ranges and might not be as destructive at longer ranges.  You need to look at the velocity and energy of the 300 grain bullet at various ranges and decide if it would be right for you.  That along with the trajectory of that same bullet.  It doesn't do you much good if you have a 100 yard zero but have to raise the sights 3+ feet at 300 yards.  That is where I like a lighter well constructed bullet.  Zeroed at 200 yards I am 1 1/2" high at 100 and only 3" low at 300 yards.  But that is with my .340 Weatherby shooting a 225 gain Barnes TSX at 2900 fps, your .338 will be about 200 fps slower with the same bullet. 

As for killing a animal the size of a moose, it doesn't take much to kill one.  Quite a few natives of Alaska use a .223 and have no problems downing them.  The problem with a moose is that they just don't know that they are dead when the bullet hits them.  

Bears are different in that you want to break down a shoulder and then get another round into them if you need to.  That is one place a 300 grain bullet would be better but a TSX or Partition will do the same thing along with having enough energy to punch through the bone and continue on into the vitals.   

Offline
Joined: 01/05/2013
Posts: 92
Thanks Critter. All day long

Thanks Critter. All day long I think and ponder about bullet selection. Trying to weigh out the pros and cons of different weights and manufacturers is hard for me to do without any field experience. You're perspective is a big help. Don't even get me started on the reloading equiptment I need to get yet!

Hey Possum!  I was wonderin' about those neck shots.  I heard that the meat from the neck of a deer is pretty good.  Is it the same with moose?  And if it's good meat, how's come you'de take a shot there over a shot to the heart or lungs? 

 

Critter's picture
Offline
Grand Slam Challenge Winner!Moderator
Location: Western Colorado
Joined: 03/26/2009
Posts: 4172
Reloading equipment is quick

Reloading equipment is quick and easy. A RCBS Rock Chucker kit and a few extra pieces and you are set for quite a while.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/937051/rcbs-rock-chucker-supreme-master...

Perhaps to answer your question to Possum, a neck shot is usually a instant kill shot. You have the spine, and major blood vessels in that area. However I have seen neck shots go very bad with a lot of hard tracking and lost game. So give me a lung/heart shot anytime over a neck shot, but I have taken neck and head shots when I have needed to.

Also in my opinion all neck meat is good for is burger or perhaps a roast. While it will taste the same as the rest of the meat it isn't high on my list of favorite cuts.

possum's picture
Offline
Location: SK Canada
Joined: 03/31/2009
Posts: 219
Thanks Critter

Critter wrote:
Perhaps to answer your question to Possum, a neck shot is usually a instant kill shot. You have the spine, and major blood vessels in that area. However I have seen neck shots go very bad with a lot of hard tracking and lost game. So give me a lung/heart shot anytime over a neck shot, but I have taken neck and head shots when I have needed to. Also in my opinion all neck meat is good for is burger or perhaps a roast. While it will taste the same as the rest of the meat it isn't high on my list of favorite cuts.

 

 Thanks Critter for answering that question, i was away for the day.

 

 Let me add that the neck meat has a lot of cartlidge and sinew and is more work than its worth to separate it; Like critter said not high on the list of favorite cuts. Also while i like the neck shot I MUST have a Rock solid rest and a Determined distance (Range Finder):: If i don't have the solid rest, i will shoot vitals. Usually the animals bleed out good too when neckshot, and not all inside so you are up to your elbows in blood when dressing them.