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bitmasher's picture
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Location: Colorado
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The .270

Thanks for the info, I was suprised when the charts only went to 175 grain that I had, figured they would at least go to 190 grains (being a bigger bore).

BTW, if you are coming down to the U.S. for this hunt and want to do a "trophy" unit, you may want to start getting your tags in now. I have no idea how close "retirement" is for you, but in some "trophy" units the wait can be staggering (10-12 years). Course you don't have to come down here, you could go for elk and mule deer in AB and I have no idea what the wait is there.

bitmasher's picture
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The .270

Bnow0707, I don't understand all the fuss either, but it doesn't tend to be over price.

The 270 has been around a long time, so there is a heritage that goes with the gun. Sometimes people using a 270 is because it has been in the family, they grew up watching their parents kill game with it.

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Location: West Carleton, Ottawa, Canada
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The .270

I'm not too fussy about where, as long as it's foothills/mountains. It doesn't even have to be a "trophy" elk...I just want the meat and the experience. I do want a decent mulie though - I'll probably shoot the first bull I see and then spend the rest of my time working for a trophy mule deer.

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Location: Southern Indiana
Joined: 09/24/2003
Posts: 28
The .270

I agree that alot of Elk may have be kill with a 270 but it is still on the light side for Elk as a general rule.

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Location: Central Virginia
Joined: 09/10/2003
Posts: 34
The .270

Shot placement is EVERYTHING. If you can't hit what you're aiming at then it doesn't matter how big (or small) the caliber is. If the bigger bores cause you to flinch then your better off staying at camp. A 270 has enough energy to drop even the biggest of bulls if the lungs/heart are hit. "Knock-down" power is just that... it knocks them down. If the vitals are not hit, they get right back up.

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Location: Florida,USA
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The .270

I agree with bitmasher, but first let me say I have not even seen an Elk in real life and probably wouldn't know one if it ran over me, so all I am commenting on is the family tradition of bashing or fight to the death defense of the .270.

I was raised to believe that anything smaller than a .30 calibre bullet was for squirrels, rabbits and other varmits.

A quick look at the ballistic charts in my Shooters Bible will tell anyone who wants to know why the 270 is such a revered calibre rifle, they shoot FLAT for a very long distance with little bullet drop and retains its energy.
Only thing bad that I have heard about the .270 is that the slightest leaf or twig will cause the bullet to veer way off course so unless you hunt wide open areas then stay away from the .270.

bitmasher's picture
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The .270

Oh I think you would know it if an elk ran over you JTapia. :smile:

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Location: Northwestern Ontario
Joined: 05/29/2003
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The .270

May as well get my two cents worth in. I just moved down to a 270 from a 300win. mag. On opening day Oct. 11 here in Northwestern Ontario I took a young bull moose at about 100yds with the 270. One shot, dropped where he stood. I was using 140gr Federal High Energy (trophy bonded bear claw bullet). Very pricey, but seem to be worth the extra coin. We chronographed the bullets at 3300fps muzzle velocity. Lots of energy out to 300yds. Unlike the 300win. mag - no kick.
Don't have any other experience with the 270 but I sure like it so far.

[ This Message was edited by: Snake on 2003-10-30 18:47 ]

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Location: Utah
Joined: 10/12/2003
Posts: 25
The .270

Boy, next to the Anti-hunting forums, the "choice of rifle" forums seem to be the most debated. The last 270 forum was locked due to name calling.

In my own 25 years of hunting experience, I have used only two caliburs, the 270 Win and 7mm Rem Mag. Both of these caliburs draw immediate debate among my hunting partners as inadequate.

I have been shown charts and graphs by the big-bore rifle gurus but when I ask to see their trophy rooms somehow the topic is changed.

I can say this from personal experience, I have hunted mule deer, whitetail, moose, elk and black bear with these caliburs in several surrounding states. I use only factory ammo. All of the animals (elk and deer)I shot with the 270 dropped within 10 yards of where I shot them. Only 1 animal (deer) has managed to walk away from my 7mm.

I have two bucks that gross over 190. 3 bucks in the 180s, and many in the 160s and 170s. This years buck was a 33 wide 6X6 (which took two shots to drop but still didnt move over 10 yards) which I have yet to score. I have killed more elk than years I have hunted and have killed a Pronghorn for the last 6 years with this years scoring 79 1/2. All shot with either a 270 or 7mm and all shot on public lands.

Am I bragging? Hell yes, but only to make a point. You can read all the reloading manuals you want and you can listen to all the big-bore, small bore arguments. My advice, find a gun that you are comfortable with, not so big that it will dislocate your jaw when you shoot but large enough to provide sufficient energy. Practice as much as possible at different yardages, and most importantly, sight your rifle in at least once a year (I like to do it more often as I tend to bang my gun around more).

And always, always, make sure that when the gums start flapping about how wimpy you, or your choice of firearms are (that was another forum), make sure the debate takes place in your tropy room.

Happy Huntin

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Location: Missouri/Arkansas
Joined: 08/21/2003
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The .270

I agree! And my feelings about the 7mm Remington Magnum are only too obvious.