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Location: DFW
Joined: 12/13/2006
Posts: 17
.270 for Mule Deer

I know that a kabillion mule deer have been killed with a .270. I was hoping to get some feed-back on the managed recoil ammo from Remington. My son is hunting mule deer with me for the first time this year. He is ten and weighs about 85 pounds. He has been hunting with a .243 with 100 grain ammo on white-tails and doing fine. I am wanting to move him up to the .270 for this hunt and get off the Rossi single shot .243 as well. It is kind of like training wheels. I filled the stock on that five pound rifle with lead shot and it shoots like a .223. I am just afraid of him hitting a shoulder on a mule deer with a small bullit. The managed recoil ammo is only a 115 grain pill. I am tempted to let him just start shooting 130 grain bullits in the .270 and see what happens. I put a limbsaver pad on it to help. Do the mercury tubes make a noticable redcution in felt recoil?

SoCoKHntr's picture
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Location: Pueblo Colorado
Joined: 12/18/2006
Posts: 1817
I think he'd be fine.

I have a 7mm Mag with a limbsaver butt pad which I can pretty much shoot off the bench with no padding. I do use a small foam cushion when shooting off the bench and the combo of the two makes it very pleasurable and mellow to shoot. Since he's been shooting the 243 already I'd say with the 270 set up you have and 130 gr pills he's good to go and any mulie in range should be worried.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2374
How recoil senstitive is he?

Two options - have him either strap on a recoil shoulder pad or just let him use the .243 until he feels comfortable using the .270.  I would not be in too much hurry to hot-rod him up to a .270 if he;s a small framed 10 year old.  I use the .270 win 130 grainers for all my biggame hunts - elk, deer, pronghorn.  I think it's a great all around cartridge for most biggame, but it does kick only a tad less than a standard .30-06 will.  For a newcomer or small framed kid any biggame cartridges have more kick than he's comfortable with.  Keep in mind though that during a hunt he should only need one shot, maybe two.

Personally I think the .270 in 130 grain is great, but most of that is due to it's higher velocity with the full powder load and 130 grain bullet.  As a result of that powder content it will kick, but I can typically shoot it all day.  But your son may not be able to. That's okay.

SoCoKHntr's picture
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Location: Pueblo Colorado
Joined: 12/18/2006
Posts: 1817
Western

has a point there. But, I feel as long as you're padded up when shooting from the bench to tame the recoil it can make a hard kicking gun mild to shoot. And, you know when actually shooting at game we really don't even feel the recoil. I'd have him shoot from the bench well padded and see if the recoil bothered him. If not I'd have him use it. If the gun fits his frame i.e. it's not too long for him to handle comfortably I think he'd be good.

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Joined: 04/21/2010
Posts: 47
.270 FOR MULE DEER

BY MY OWN PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, I HAVE USED A 243 ON

MULIES, THE HANDLOADS WERE TOPPED WITH NOSLER 95 OR 100

GRAIN PARTITIONS.  KEEP THE RANGE UNDER 200 YARDS WITH

A SIDE SHOT THRU THE HEART/LUNG AREA - DEAD DEER.

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Grand Slam Challenge Winner!
Location: NE NV
Joined: 03/18/2010
Posts: 383
What's the Hurry

Stick with the .243 & shoot 100 gr partitions. Unless the buck is WAY out there the nosler will take care of a shoulder shot & the .243 has taken care if it's own kabillion deer. There's plenty of time for the boy to grow into a larger gun. That said, I'm planing on my daughter using Remington reduced loads in her 7-08 this year, mostly because of recoil.

Something else to think about is the overall size and weight of the .270. If he's like most 10 yr old boys, he'll want to carry his own gun thank you verry much & the .270 might just be too long, heavy and/or cumbersome.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2374
Not nessesarily

Hal Fast wrote:

If he's like most 10 yr old boys, he'll want to carry his own gun thank you verry much & the .270 might just be too long, heavy and/or cumbersome.

It all depends.  Most .243 Win chambered rifles are about as heavy and sized equally to an average rifle chambered in .270 Win.  Only size difference will be  the size of action. My Winchester Model 70 Featherweight is chambered in .270 Win and weighs less and is more compact than most .243 Win sporters are. But to get back on subject I don't see any problem with having a 10 year old, or anyone else for that matter, use a .243 Win on a deer.  It performs quite well. 

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Location: NE NV
Joined: 03/18/2010
Posts: 383
Western,

I agree that different rifles, actions etc. make the weight different. Remember though that Bubba's future hunting partner is shooting a Rossi single shot. Great, versatile little gun but small in stock dimentions and light in weight. I'd personally have to think twice before I touched off a .270 in a similarly sized rifle. .270 recoil from an 8 lb Model 70 ain't the same as as from a 5.5 lb Rossi. 

Location: From Grand Junction CO, stationed in Arizona
Joined: 08/01/2010
Posts: 545
My 10 year old with a 270

I’m taking my son on his first elk and blacktail deer hunt this year and I am getting him a 270 for it.  I don’t think the weight of the gun really matters for my son.  We won’t be doing a lot of spot and stalk hunting so all he has to do is carry it to the blind and it’s only for about two weeks this year.  After that the next time he will need to use the 270 is next hunting season.  He can continue to practice on his 22 and 22-250. When it comes around to next year, he has a 270 and will put on a couple pounds and should be able to shoot the 270 at the range all day too.  At least that’s what I’m doing with my son.

 

As a couple other members mentioned a 243 will work on Mule deer too.  I don’t have a 243 for my son so I am jumping from the 22-250 (not legal for big game in WA) to the 270 and he can grow into it.

WesternHunter's picture
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Joined: 05/05/2006
Posts: 2374
Unfortunate

It's unfortunate that the .22-250 is illegal to use on certain biggame in many states, mine included.  It's such a great cartridge for smaller framed biggame like Blacktail deer, Whitetail deer, and Pronghorn  for use by shooters who are either recoil sensitive, very young, or petite.  But I think if a kid can shoot trap or sporting clays with a light target load 12 ga shotgun then a .270 Win (even from a light rifle) should not bother him/her one bit on a rifle hunt.

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3205
I don't understand the need

I don't understand the need to get a 10yr old boy into a larger cartridge so soon. The 243 with a 100gr bullet is more than adequate, a 260 Rem would be even better. I have never got the idea of getting something like the 270 and down loading it to something lesser just so the user can have the 270. I suspect that unless your son is a stout kid, a 25-06 will bother him to shoot, weather he admits it or not. And a 25-06 is just not all that lacking as a deer carttridge. If you are thinking about getting him a rifle he'll be able to use as he get's older and bigger, he'll still be able to use even his 243 and probably will understand it better than he does now. Of course if he does want something else as he get's bigger, get it then. If he is like most of us on here he'll have a lot more than one or two rifles anyway.

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