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Don Fischer's picture
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good call

Topgun 30-06 wrote:

I'm one that always tells it like it is, so here goes.  I would never have let her take her first shot at a deer that was over 200 yards away, especially with the .243.  The deer at 34 yards quartering away that ran into the swamp over 50 yards away with no evidence was probably also missed.  Why did the deer you say you shot near hers with your 30-06 go that far and did you find it?  I think you're making a big mistake going up to the 30-06 for her with all the problems you've mentioned with the .243.  Shooting a bigger caliber, IMHO, is just asking for more problems.  If she couldn't hit either of those animals, using that bigger caliber won't do any good because you still have to put the bullet in the vitals no matter what caliber you use.  The .243 or even moving up to a 25-06 is more than enough gun for that girl IF she does her job and again, IMHO, doing all of what you just stated with a bigger caliber isn't going to help her one bit and may exacerbate the situation.

Good post and that is pretty much how it is. Get her to shoot that 243 a lot between now and next season. Get her away from the range and out in the field to shoot. You'll have a lot better chance of her getting her deer that way.

CVC
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Do you know where the bullet

Do you know where the bullet will impact at 34 yards?  The bullet will drop before rising so you have to know the ballistics of the bullet not only at long range but short range too.

I was just at the range and shot the target at 25 yards to see if I was on the paper and I was dead on.  When I shot at 100 yards I was about 4 inches high.  Make sure you shoot the gun at 25 yards to see where it impacts if you expect close range shots.

Good luck.

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CVC---I have to disagree with

CVC---I have to disagree with your "the bullet drops before it rises" statement!  It is "below the line of sight" when leaving the barrel as you are looking through the scope mounted above the barrel, but it is never going down BEFORE it rises.  It starts going down immediately after it leaves the barrel if the barrel is perfectly horizontal and that's where zeroing at a know distance comes in.  Normally most people that are shooting any distance are zeroing 2-3" high at 100 yards, which means the barrel is above horizontal.  That will definitely mean that at very close range you will need to aim lower on the target to hit exactly where you want the POI. 

CVC
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Okay, I'll concede my

Okay, I'll concede my terminology wasn't technically correct.  You're right, it doesn't actually drop, but the point of impact for a .243 sighted in at 200 yards will be the same at 25 yards as it is at 200 yards and lower than the point of impact at 100 yards.

I confirmed this before through ballistic tables and reconfirmed it before posting this.  Go to Winchester's sight and you can do it for any caliber.  It was the same if the rifle was sighted in for 100 yards.

So you don't aim lower at 25, but instead aim the same as the distance you have sighted it in at.

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There is only one POI when

There is only one POI when you shoot a bullet.  I believe you mean that the bullet crosses the line of sight at the shorter distance and again at the POI where you have zeroed it for a longer distance.  Those two will vary with the caliber, bullet used, how far the scope is above the bore, etc.  Normally it saves ammo and time to bore sight a rifle and fire it at 25 yards to see that the POI is on paper and fairly close to the bullseye.  Then you can move back to 100 yards and shoot to put the bullet on the button for close range hunting or several inches high if you plan on shooting an animal at longer distances.  I don't know how many times I've seen guys start at the longer distance with a new gun/scope combination and not even hit paper.  Then they start guessing and moving the turrets all over "trying " to hit paper and watse a lot of ammo that could be saved by doing what I mentioned.  That's also where it's good to have a chart like you mentioned to know the ranges where the bullet will be above and below the zero point by the same number of inches.  An example would be that it's high point might be 3" above the bull at 100 yards and 3" below at say 300 yards.  That is normally what guys call the maximum point blank range for a particular load.  However, a person should never just go by the charts, but actually shoot at the different distances to know exactly what their particular gun will do because it varies.   You should never zero a gun so high that you have a huge gap at those two distances because if you get a shot at a short distance and don't aim low you will have a good chance of missing or wounding the animal with a low shot.

CVC
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I won't argue about the

I won't argue about the definition of POI since it isn't important to this discussion.

My original point was and it is a valid one, is that you need to know how your rifle will shoot at 25 yards if you are going to be shooting at game at that distance.  If you sight your rifle for 200 yards it would be a mistake to shoot low. The chart will tell you this and so will the range.

I sight my rifle in for 200 yards and if I put my 200 reticle on the target at 25 I will be dead on so at least with my rifle I don't aim low.  I use the 200 reticle for 25 yards.

Again, that was my point, know your rifle and where to aim at the distances you're going to shoot.

 

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A bullet never rise's. It

A bullet never rise's. It start's to drop the instent it leaves the barrel. The sights are adjusted to make it appear the bullet is rising when in fact it is always dropping.

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maybe we should say that the

maybe we should say that the bullet is traveling upwards through the line of sight and then downwards accross the line of sight?

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Sounds good to me, LOL!!!

Sounds good to me, LOL!!!

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From what I have experienced

From what I have experienced and a lot of other people that posted on here the .243 is enough for a deer.  I'm guessing its the shooter but I hope she gets a deer this year.  Even though I think the .243 is enough for deer im still gonna buy a .270 if I get a new deer rifle just because its bigger lol hopefully she puts a deer down.

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