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Location: Melvina, Wi.
Joined: 02/18/2007
Posts: 262
.223 problem

I am reloading some once fired brass from Brassman-I sized it all and trimmed to length( 1.750) -when I started loading cases-some seemd to only chamber if shortened to 2.220 rather than anywhere near the max OAL of 2.260--after a few tries they would chamber leaving me to believe the shoulders were stretched??? Ok those that chambered from magazine were scratched along the case body but if slipped into the chamber they were not scratched-
The rifle is a Remington 700 Varmit with heavy barrel- it is not much of gun IMHO. but I have it and will try and use- it has been suggested that perhaps the chamber entrance is not perfectly smooth- any suggstions or help appreciated.

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Joined: 12/03/2005
Posts: 1691
.223 problem

What comes to mind is that you are full-length sizing some cases and some are being neck sized, or somewhere in between.

Don Fischer's picture
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Location: Antelope, Ore
Joined: 03/24/2005
Posts: 3190
Re: .223 problem
Widux wrote:
I am reloading some once fired brass from Brassman-I sized it all and trimmed to length( 1.750) -when I started loading cases-some seemd to only chamber if shortened to 2.220 rather than anywhere near the max OAL of 2.260--after a few tries they would chamber leaving me to believe the shoulders were stretched??? Ok those that chambered from magazine were scratched along the case body but if slipped into the chamber they were not scratched-
The rifle is a Remington 700 Varmit with heavy barrel- it is not much of gun IMHO. but I have it and will try and use- it has been suggested that perhaps the chamber entrance is not perfectly smooth- any suggstions or help appreciated.

If I understand this right, your having trouble after you've reloaded them and it's the OLL that is the problem? Your not talking about a lot of difference in length and it could well be that the ones that don't fit actually have the ogive out farther. Look at the bullet's in the cases that don't work and look for short nick's around the bullet's where they might have intruded on the lands. If you find them, seat the bullets a bit deeper. They may not be very long.

OLL can be a decieving thing. It's measured from the base of the cartridge to the tip of the bullet. Accurately measured it's from the base to the bullet's ogive. You could have a chamber with a bit short throat and a few bullets with a bit long ogive. Combine the two and your feeling the bullet contact the rifling.

JJD
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Location: Right Side WA state
Joined: 11/07/2008
Posts: 208
.223 problem

Where the 223 is such a popular cartidge, If there is a gunsmith anywhere in yur area, they should have a set of "go / "no go " gauges. They can tell you immediately if the chanber is short.
Remember, that the vast majority of rifles do much better if they have a small amount of space where the bullet meets the rifling lands. A bit of jump.
Check this with a smoked bullet in a cartridge of a cheap black felt pen. If your cartridge bullet is in contact with the lands, accuracy may suffer and you will likely see signs of increased pressure too.

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Location: Melvina, Wi.
Joined: 02/18/2007
Posts: 262
.223 problem

i had gunsmith do some work on magazine and i checked brass- all seems to be owrking ok now- i load the bullets about 10/1,000ths of the lands.
Thanks for replies.

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