Man Loses Dogs to Coyote, Not Allowed to Fence Yard

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Derrick Czapla of Inverness, Illinois received a phone call from his nanny while at work. One of his mini Doberman pinschers had been attacked by a coyote and the other had been carried off into the woods by another coyote. Czapla rushed home to search for his missing dog, Killer in the woods.  Killer was found about 20 minutes later, he had about 40-50 puncture wounds on him and was chewed up. Though Killer was found alive, he did not survive.

After the incident, Czapla wanted to fence in his 2 1/2 acre yard. However there are restrictions against fencing as it promotes "a more open and rural setting," Village Administrator Curt Carver said. Czapla just wants the fence for security, he's not concerned about appearances. His daughter has not been outside to play since the coyote incident, and now he walks his dog on a leash watching in all directions. Czapla feels unsafe in his own yard. Village officials have stated that residents can hire a wildlife trapper. From Chicago Tribune.

Comments

groovy mike's picture

That just seems silly to me.

Arrow flipper you could be right about the homeowner’s association connection but I think I read all that I needed to know when I saw that Inverness, Illinois news is close enough to be reported in the Chicago Tribune.  We all know that Chicago is a freedom hating town.  Just try to own a gun tehre.  In fact, if I am not mistaken you need a special identification card allowing you to even buy AMMUNITION (not jus firearms) in the state of Illinois.  That just seems silly to me. 

Mr. Czapla should indeed seek legal recourse including an application to carry a pistol to protect his family and nuisance permits to take out the coyotes in the area. 

If the ‘Village officials’ deny either then I think you are right on target to have them fund the hiring of ‘a wildlife trapper’

GooseHunter Jr's picture

Yeah I too would have to say

Yeah I too would have to say that he has some issues to deal with.  He chose to live in a place that has wild animals and now those animals are a problem for him, but they were indeed there first.  Would I feel the same if was my dog that was drug off...I hope so.  Now with all that said with regards to his daughter I think he should be able to protect her in some way that she will feel confronable.  But time will heal all that...hopefully.  I think that is just something you should exopect when you move to the "country" or the "woods".

arrowflipper's picture

predicament

First of all, it made me smile when I read the dog's name..... "Killer".  I'm still smiling.

Derrick has a real predicament.  He has chosen to live in a community with strict covenants.  I too live in such a community.  I don't like all the covenants but I tend to like what they have done for my community.  Fences are a very controversial issue.  They do block views and they do make an area look chopped up.  On the other hand, a good fence offers a certain amount of protection.

I would love to own a small utility trailer to use for hunting and/or hauling yard waste, but I am, by covenant, not allowed to park one on my property.  People can scream "restrictions" all day long, but I knew that condition when I moved in.  I chose to accept those restrictions as a condition of living in a neighborhood that keeps its' resale value high.  I have friends that tell me they wouldn't live in a community that dictates what they can and can't do, but I tend to like living in a clean, clutter-free environment.  I am proud of where I live.

With that said, I would suggest one thing to Derrick.  I would suggest that he draw up a legal document stating his fears and how he would like to have a fence for protection.  Take it to his homeowner's association and insist that they either give him permission in writing or reject his plea in writing.  In essence, they have made themselves liable in case something should happen.  No association wants to be liable for anything.  It might make them take a closer look at their covenants or hire someone themselves to take care of the problem.

I live in a heavily forested area and I had a couple of trees on my property that I was afraid would fall and damage my house.  My association refused to let me cut them down.  I drew up a document, had it signed by an arborist and gave it to them.  If made it clear that if the tree fell on my house after they refused to let me cut it down, they were liable.  Interesting development.... I received a letter giving me permission to cut the tree.

Maybe Derrick needs to do something of this nature since it truly is a danger.  Or.... maybe he needs to move to another neighborhood where they allow fences???